It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Wolves Return to Oregon: Large Pack Confirmed

page: 1
29
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:
+2 more 
posted on Nov, 20 2009 @ 11:26 PM
link   
Until fairly recently, we hadn't seen a wolf in Oregon in over 60 years!


JOSEPH, Ore. - The state Department of Fish and Wildlife says a wildlife biologist videotaped a pack of at least 10 gray wolves on Forest Service land in Eastern Oregon. The agency says the pack is the largest yet confirmed in Oregon since wolves began returning to the state in the late 1990s.

The video doesn't have sound, but there is a description from the ODFW at the end.

Caught on tape: largest confirmed Oregon wolf pack - IEODFW's Channel



Now, biologists say more wolves are coming and that's creating quite a controversy. Because wolves are protected, livestock producers may scare a wolf off, but may not harm a wolf in any way without a permit from ODFW, even one seen in the act of attacking livestock.


WOLF MANAGEMENT IN OREGON: Wolves will not be reintroduced into Oregon. It is expected, however, that wolves will continue to disperse into Oregon from neighboring states. Wolves in Oregon are protected by the state Endangered Species Act. West of Hwys 395-78-95, they are also protected by the federal ESA. Wolves east of that boundary are managed by ODFW through its Wolf Conservation and Management Plan.

The goal of Oregon’s wolf plan is to ensure the conservation of gray wolves as required by Oregon law while protecting the social and economic interests of all Oregonians. The plan was developed with input form a variety of stakeholders including livestock producers, conservationists, hunters, trappers and other wildlife experts. It was formally adopted by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission in December 2005


Quite cool, I think, though I can understand the concerns and the problems that such a thing may cause for the locals who's livelihoods may be affected by the presence of wolves. There is, however, something to be said for encouraging and protecting the survival of the wolves and it pleases me to see them venture back.


Additional Links... Regulation Info.

ODFW

Wildlife Division

Wolf Mgmt Plan pdf


[edit on 21-11-2009 by LadySkadi]




posted on Nov, 20 2009 @ 11:44 PM
link   
Just saw a wolf documentary a week ago. They are surprisingly intelligent creatures.

The most interesting thing about the documentary was that it showed how wolves assassinate each other to up their social status in the pack. Crazy...



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 12:52 AM
link   
Thank you so much for this interesting post. I think the wolves are one of the most beautiful creatures of the animal kingdom. This is very encouraging that they are returning. There has been a few times that I have had wolf. I miss that too, not allowed to own one in the city limits



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 01:07 AM
link   
TY, Wolves are my favourite creature (besides baby hedgehogs).

We cant keep taking over land and have nature take 2nd place.
Its not sustainable, Steve Irwin RIP knew the importance of the eco cycle, I hope he's smiling at this



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 01:08 AM
link   
reply to post by LadySkadi
 


I am glad to see that the wolves are returning. There must be a way to keep man and wolf able to co-exist.

In all my years spent in the bush, although I have heard wolves many times, I have only seen them twice. They are very elusive and stay away from man as much as possible.

And you haven't lived, until you hear the wolves howl outside your tent in the middle of the night. Beautiful and frightening at the same time.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 01:35 AM
link   
can they send some to Calif.

We have a over abundance of tree loving hippies that they can feed on.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 01:37 AM
link   
This area of Oregon (NE corner of the state) is fairly isolated and rugged. The wolves are originally from Idaho and crossed over to the area. Seems like a perfect place for wolves to survive.





Oregon has slowly built a small wolf population since the species began naturally moving into the state from neighboring Idaho in 1999. Wolf recovery progress in Oregon has twice been slowed by the illegal shooting and killing of wolves. Fewer than a dozen wolves are believed to be roaming the far northeastern reaches of the state. Despite this modest population, livestock producers are already lobbying the state legislature for the authority to kill endangered wolves. Current state law prohibits the killing of a gray wolf without a permit.

“Fifty years ago we killed every single wolf in the state,” added Stevens. “Now, with just a handful of wolves back in Oregon, some people have this knee jerk reaction to want to kill them again.”


Oregon Wild - May 09



[edit on 21-11-2009 by LadySkadi]



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 02:47 AM
link   

Originally posted by ANNED
can they send some to Calif.

We have a over abundance of tree loving hippies that they can feed on.


On the flipside, There is plenty of shallow elitest trash those wolves would probably enjoy moreso..

im not a hippie, not saying your an elitest



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 03:14 AM
link   
CREEPY!!

I just saw four charts last week that showed that Oregon is the safest place to live in America in the case of war, nuclear fallout, ect. . .

I wonder. . .


EDIT: Ok I just found where I saw that: www.abovetopsecret.com...
About 15 posts down.

Wow! How odd. Especially seeing as though it's canines who are notorious for their sixth sense.

[edit on 21-11-2009 by FlyingZombies]



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 04:21 AM
link   
They're probably just heading up there to help out there brothers in the war against the Vampires.


God, I hate myself......



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 05:40 AM
link   
As long as wolves don't attack people, I don't see it as a big problem, but them I don't have a ranch with livestock Perhaps the rancher's should be compensated for their losses as part of the program.

I was driving across the pass a couple of years ago and there was this beautiful white wolf running through the treas above me like he was chasing me. He would turn his head & then seemed to smile at me & then continue running. He popped out in a clearing a few times & then disappeared. It really made my day.


[edit on 21-11-2009 by verylowfrequency]



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 06:07 AM
link   
I live in western Oregon farm country and can report that most people around here want no parts of them. They don't want to lose livestock and just seem to have a natural fear/dislike.

I'd personally love to see them make a comeback. There's plenty of wild game for them and it would give the cougars a little competition.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 06:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by beezwaxes

I live in western Oregon farm country and can report that most people around here want no parts of them. They don't want to lose livestock and just seem to have a natural fear/dislike.

I'd personally love to see them make a comeback. There's plenty of wild game for them and it would give the cougars a little competition.





The old timers killed off top level predators because they wanted to be at the top of the food chain. Even if these elegant animals normally avoid man, they will seek easy prey when they get sick or old.

We can hold hands and sing kumbaya all day long but the simple fact is that livestock, pets and small people (like children and small women) are going to be mauled or killed by these animals. Hell, there are even reports of pack-hunting stray dogs killing and eating children in the cities.

Reintroducing these predators is a serious, foolish mistake. Will your child, wife or pet pay the price?



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 07:31 AM
link   
YAY!

I love wolves!



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 08:19 AM
link   
reply to post by praxis
 


Wild wolves want very little to do with humans. The old timers killed them off because they were eating their animals, that much is true. It's a tough call but I still think they should be reintroduced here (Oregon).

Feral dogs are another story, apples and oranges.

People have learned to live with the big cats. There's a lot of them around here and I'd say they're a much worse potential threat than the wolves. They admittedly gobble up some livestock but people do ok.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 08:22 AM
link   
Unfortunately, it's inevitable that man and wolf will collide again. The wolves will come upon a livestock farm and look at it as an "all you can eat" buffet. Easy kills for the Pack will make them keep coming back. The farmers will eventually have had enough and shoot them all.


Sad but true. Wolves can't thrive where there are lots of livestock, otherwise we end up killing them.

[edit on 21-11-2009 by pavil]



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 08:26 AM
link   
reply to post by jimmyjohen
 


Wolves taught people how to survive in the wilds

They are amazing creatures.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 08:26 AM
link   
reply to post by jimmyjohen
 


Wolves taught people how to survive in the wilds

They are amazing creatures.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 10:10 AM
link   
reply to post by beezwaxes
 


I have heard that since the law passed with regards to how cougars are hunted, that there has been a huge increase in the cougar population and that is a big concern. There are issues in many areas of the state with cougars coming into contact with the population, very dangerous.

The "old timers" have spent generations wiping out the wolf populations for the sake of protecting livestock and though I understand why that happened, it cannot be the only way to control and manage the issue. I don't have the answers, but the questions must be asked...



[edit on 21-11-2009 by LadySkadi]



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 10:16 AM
link   
reply to post by praxis
 


I know that an increase in the wolf population will be an issue for ranchers, (as is the increase in cougar population) but how much of an issue is debatable, at this time. The wolf population is small, it will take time before it is large enough (if ever) to lift restrictions so in the meantime; we must come to some alternative methods to co-exist.

The argument can no longer be made that it is permissible to wipe out entire species of animal in order to prevent livestock from being lost.


Reintroducing these predators is a serious, foolish mistake. Will your child, wife or pet pay the price?

Genuinely curious as to how wolves are more of a concern, in this case, than cougar or bear populations? At present, those two have been found to be encroaching on more populated areas...


[edit on 21-11-2009 by LadySkadi]



new topics

top topics



 
29
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join