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So That's It. We Are Just Going To Sit Back And Let Them Kill Us???

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posted on Nov, 16 2009 @ 11:41 PM
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"And to see you're really only very small. And life flows on within you and without you."

I am ready to die personally...I've had a great run and if the flu gets me, so be it. That's not to say I'm not worried about others, though. I feel morally conflicted due to my own ignorance. If I tell people not to get vaccinated and it turns out that this could have prevented their death, I am morally culpable. On the other hand, if I recommend the vaccine and it turns out to be harmful or even lethal in and of itself, I would also be morally culpable. I am not a physician, and I have seen convincing arguments on both sides of the fence. The best I can (and have done) at this point is to try to get my family and friends to look at the issue critically and make up their own minds...to be aware that there may be more going on than meets the eye. So far I think the reception has been good and I am happy people seem to be willing to think for themselves on it. Other than that, what could or should I possibly do, espcially givem my acute awareness of the dilemma in the moral dimension?




posted on Nov, 16 2009 @ 11:41 PM
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What do the next generations have to look forward to? If we make it that far.



posted on Nov, 16 2009 @ 11:44 PM
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Originally posted by capgirl
A person I know made a statement, which makes sense to me.

He said that if most of everyone in America would just leave their job, go straight to Washington DC, and take over the whitehouse, (And that is A.L.O.T of people) then I think MAYBE something would get done in this country, Obama would do something, and the government would finally fear the PEOPLE instead of the other way around.

But ofcourse no one wants to stand up for what is right.

[edit on 16-11-2009 by capgirl]


Great idea, but I don't want to get shot.

Seriously though, there are a lot of angry people gearing up for a fight of some sort. People are sick and tired of the bull. Starred and flagged this thread.



posted on Nov, 16 2009 @ 11:49 PM
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It's not the people that see it coming that I'm mainly worried about, because we are somewhat mentally preparing ourselves for the terrible things that are about to happen. It's the people who are trying to ignore it, and the people who have the crazy idea that things are gonna get better, these people will probaly go crazy when the # hits the fan.



posted on Nov, 16 2009 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by randyvs
 


Well you are correct. I chose an incorrect word. I am referring to the devilish elitists and the governments who want population reduction.

As far as growing up, i'm plenty grown up. So anyone who is mature and grown up according to you, should just take it? Thats what is wrong with this world, dear. We dont have to take it.



posted on Nov, 16 2009 @ 11:54 PM
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Originally posted by Night Star

Originally posted by capgirl
A person I know made a statement, which makes sense to me.

He said that if most of everyone in America would just leave their job, go straight to Washington DC, and take over the whitehouse, (And that is A.L.O.T of people) then I think MAYBE something would get done in this country, Obama would do something, and the government would finally fear the PEOPLE instead of the other way around.

But ofcourse no one wants to stand up for what is right.

[edit on 16-11-2009 by capgirl]


Great idea, but I don't want to get shot.

Seriously though, there are a lot of angry people gearing up for a fight of some sort. People are sick and tired of the bull. Starred and flagged this thread.


Yea everyone would be shot and the whitehouse would claim that it was an act of terroism. It wouldn't be very intelligent. Then more laws would be passed taking away even more of our freedoms.

[edit on 16-11-2009 by HumbleStudent111]



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by HumbleStudent111
 

What if 50 million gun owners showed up?
Would they listen then?

I know alot of people that are fed up.
Everywhere you go you hear how mad people are!

It's like they barely just woke up to the fact they have been lied to
and ripped off for years now by their sacred leaders! Go figure!


I'm just being a smart a**.

Thanks!



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:01 AM
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reply to post by dgtempe
 


Do you know what you need?

PERSPECTIVE




Hello from Zimbabwe. My name is Brenda Ndapasuwa, and I live in Mabvuku township right outside the capital of Harare. In celebration of International Youth Day on August 12, 2009, I'll be "tweeting" about a typical day in my life on Twitter*. Join us at www.twitter.com/catholicrelief.

I'm happy to share a little about me and my country, but I'm not sure where to start. Well, I'm 14 years old and am halfway through seventh grade. I didn't start my formal education until I was 11, because my mom was sick a lot, and my stepfather wouldn't allow me or my brother and sister to go to school. Sometimes he would even give his biological children meat for dinner but would just give us some vegetables. It wasn't a very good time.

Our mom died when I was 9, my sister was 10 and my brother was 12. Because of all the problems in Zimbabwe, no relatives could afford to take us all in together. First I moved in with an uncle, but he had four other children. I could tell it was difficult for me to also be there. Then my mom's younger sister brought me to her house. She treated me like a daughter and thought it was very important for me to get an education.

That's when I started school at Mavambo Learning Center, a place supported by Catholic Relief Services that helps children who have never attended school quickly learn how to read and write so we can enter the regular education system. Because I'm a fast learner and get good grades, after just a year and a half I entered fifth grade at Batanai Primary School. Last term, I was sixth in my class of 43 students. I love reading English books, and I really want to go to college, especially after visiting the University of Zimbabwe.

My aunt died two years ago, so now I'm living with another uncle. We live on a compound with my two other uncles, their wives, and nine children, including me—with each family unit having a room of their own. Taking in orphans like me isn't easy since most people struggle to earn money here, but fortunately my uncle Andrew let me become part of his family. I miss my mom and my brother and sister, but it's okay. I still get to go to school, and my uncle works as a mechanic in a car garage, so we have an electric stove to cook on and even eat meat a few times each week. *



Some 12 million children in Africa have been orphaned by Aids - and that number is rising, according to the Save the Children Fund (SCF). As the UN holds its conference on Aids orphans in Africa, BBC News Online looks at the plight of a Ugandan child helped by the SCF. Teddy lives in a village in southern Uganda. Her parents died of Aids-related illnesses when she was 11. She now lives with her three brothers and sisters and helps to look after three other boys whose parents also died of Aids-related illnesses. She told her story to SCF workers:

My mother and father died in 1996. My father died in the hospital.

Some neighbours say bad things about us - they say: 'Those children are so poor; they don't even have relatives, they don't belong'

But I saw my mother die here. Because I was a bit older than the others, I looked after her.

I used to cook food for her, wash her clothes, and boil herbs for her.

She told me she was suffering from Aids, but she didn't tell me how she got it or how to avoid it.

I wish she'd told me more about it. I'd like to know how it's transmitted.

Picked on by neighbours

When my mother died we suffered so much. There was no food, and there was no one to look after us.

We didn't even have money to buy soap and salt.

We wanted to run away to our other grandparents, but we didn't have transport to go there.

I tried to be positive, but it was difficult.

I missed my mother because I loved her so much.

When my mum was here we didn't suffer. We had food and money for buying things.

Some neighbours say bad things about us: 'Those children are so poor; they don't even have relatives. They don't belong. They don't have a clan.'

Some people also call us 'Aids orphans', and they say that maybe our parents infected us.

We don't say anything. At least no one oppresses us.

We're also free to play when we want, and there's nobody telling us to do this or that.

Robbed

A while ago some neighbours came here and asked us to sell them our trees.

We agreed and we sold them.

But they haven't given us the money.

We've tried getting the money from them, but they won't give it.

Sometimes people come and steal food from our garden. My grandfather's brother comes and takes the coffee.

He just steals it when the beans are still on the trees.

I don't go to school. I'd like to go, but my grandparents and neighbours told me to stay at home and look after the others.

If I were educated I'd like to be a nurse.

I want to treat other people and heal them from whatever they're suffering from.

I want to do this because when my mother was sick, there was nobody to look after her because we had no money. *


From May this year:


Zimbabwe cholera cases set to top 100,000

The Red Cross has warned that Zimbabwe's cholera epidemic will continue unless more resources are allocated to fix the causes.

The number of Zimbabweans infected with cholera is expected to top 100,000 this week.

While the rate of infection has slowed the Red Cross has warned that little has been done to fix the causes, and further outbreaks are inevitable.

The country's water and sewerage infrastructure is still not functioning in many communities and the health system is in disarray.

The Red Cross says it has been forced to scale back its relief operations because of inadequate funding.

Zimbabwe's unity government is also desperately appealing for international aid to help restore its run-down infrastructure. *




[edit on 17/11/09 by Chadwickus]



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Chad, the fact that this is allowed to go on in the world tells us that the tptb are not looking out for our best interests.

Whilst I understand the point you're trying to make here I might put forth that it is one in the same.

There are people dying in many countries because they have little access to certain things. Stating it is worse there does not negate it's bad here, or elsewhere.



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by dodadoom
reply to post by HumbleStudent111
 

What if 50 million gun owners showed up?
Would they listen then?

I know alot of people that are fed up.
Everywhere you go you hear how mad people are!

It's like they barely just woke up to the fact they have been lied to
and ripped off for years now by their sacred leaders! Go figure!


I'm just being a smart a**.

Thanks!


What do you think would happen if 50 million gun owners showed up? or if 50 million people with guns were at the same place at the same time? and would you really want that to happen?



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by Seiko
 


I'm merely adding a little perspective and pointing out that those of us who live in the "first world" really have nothing to complain about and for those that think that their government wants them dead or oppressed should go spend some time in a "third world" country to really open their eyes up.

[edit on 17/11/09 by Chadwickus]



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by HumbleStudent111
 

I know!
Just think of the smell!
Whooooo!




posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:24 AM
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It seems that nothing can be done.



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:28 AM
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reply to post by dodadoom
 


Then think of all the people who weren't shot, but can smell all the people who were shot, and begin to vomit from the smell, and then think of how it would smell then!




posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:30 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 

I agree but try to go easy on us.

It is very hard for people who have had everything,
go to having nothing.

At least they thought they had everything!

It is really all owned by and only about the banks.



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:33 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Fair enough.

But instead of doing that perhaps we can help people stop this defeatist attitude. There is always room for improvement in any society or country. So our countries are better then zinbabwe in our minds, that does not mean we can't improve them. There is a lot of finetuning that can be done on a daily basis. If we simply gave up because it was too hard, or we're too comfortable, or it's worse somewhere else we've lost.

There's a reason that they think this. You may not agree with it. But my country has done some pretty messed up things. I can't speak to where djtempe is from. I know the u.s. has done so many things that are not in the interests of it's citizens. This creates a sense of betrayal, and then anger and finally apathy.

We should all challenge each other to help improve our world. There's not a lot I can do for zimbabwe as a single person, but I can do things here.


I realize we all have different conspiracy theories, and many don't truly think the government is out to kill them. You have to admit they are becoming huge, the possibility for disaster is there if we don't stay vigil and always keep them in balance.

The op specifically mentions the medical complex. It is huge, and is profit driven. their interests are in money, not in the individual. The possibility for corruption is so real you can't just dismiss it so easily.



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:40 AM
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reply to post by Seiko
 


Well what I do to stop my defeatist attitude is to remember that there are a lot of people worse off than me, my problems are trivial in comparison.

It keeps me grounded.

But I do understand the fear some have, as long as they realise that governments don't need to be sneaky about it. If they want you oppressed, you'll be oppressed, just ask Robert Mugabe.



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:45 AM
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If everyone gave everyone else a star the world would be a better place.



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:48 AM
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As far as growing up, i'm plenty grown up. So anyone who is mature and grown up according to you, should just take it? Thats what is wrong with this world, dear. We dont have to take it.
reply to post by dgtempe
 


Hey dear heart What I posted wasn't meant to offend you .
I feel you in a big way , the crux of what I said was there is always hope.
I am one of the most neg. people usually.
I will always have hope though. I don't feel any guilt for what is coming,
yet I am so sorry for todays kids.That's the real heartbreaker in all of this for me.
I didn't like you being in that dark place I felt you were in there for a bit. ok? More like you took it all in,(the info) now you got to take the medicine same as all of us.




[edit on 17-11-2009 by randyvs]



posted on Nov, 17 2009 @ 12:49 AM
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Chadwickus if you aren't going to help solve the problem just please refrain from commenting....
Great charismatic leaders have always helped pull the masses together in the past so where is THIS time's ??
Hopefully he/they haven't already been identified and terminated...


Oh...and a star for HumbleStudent...




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