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Analyze me.

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posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 06:51 PM
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When I was fresh out of high school I joined the Navy. The first night at bootcamp I new I had made a mistake when I seen the barb wired fence pointed in to keep us from escaping. I actually had a good time after that . I was mentally/physically prepared for bootcamp....wow I didn't know there were so many curse words.

Any way, I made it halfway through electrical training till this one point with triangles test...new surroundings...no parents, lost intrest in being an electrician. Got sent to a VP squardon and ended up being a line man. I liked the work alot and was good at it . Did some after I got out. I love this country and its people. But the whole time I was enlisted I felt like I was I jail . I was so happy when I got my honorable discharge. 30 years later I find myself wishing I could rejoin . Wanting to fight. I was never affraid of dying while serving or even now as a civilian. I just hated the way things were done and how trapped I felt while in the Navy.

Thats what I want you folks to give your views on. Just trying to get a better understanding of me. Thanks . Feel free to ask me whatever and try not to beat me up too bad.




posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by Grayelf2009
 




Analyze me.


Thanks but... no thanks. I don't know you any better than any other of the thousands who visit here. Chances are, I never will. Your story may be factual but even so, one brief episode from your lifetime to this point is far from enough to even begin.

Write a detailed biography, list all your sources and offer personal contacts for verification and expanded research... and pay me for my time and doggone it, I will be the first in line!




posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by Grayelf2009
 


Very normal reaction, IMO. Many young people engage in something right after high school (a new job, college, the military, etc.) and find themselves in a situation they didn't fully expect which results in them disliking their situation. Then as they get older they wish they could do it again or do it right.

Sometimes the timing in our lives just isn't right for what we're involved in. Later down the road, it sounds more appealing or we wish we could 'do it all over again' once we're at a point in our lives where we'd be better at handling it.

You were young, right out of high school, and like most youth, probably naive (not a bad thing) and wanted to be young and free... only to find yourself fenced in after joining the Navy. Thirty years later with more under your belt, you no longer consider those surroundings as threatening as you once did. It's natural.


I went through the same thing with college. I was very sheltered and lived in a bubble due to the way my parents raised me. It was all so overwhelming suddenly being on my own. Ten years later, I could handle it now without being so scared and overwhelmed. It just wasn't the right time in my life yet. So it happens to everyone when we're young. Sometimes suddenly finding ourselves out in the world when we're not fully prepared or knowledgeable of how it works can be a shock to our system.



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by AshleyD
 


Show off



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 07:24 PM
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As a mid 30's something, looking back, there are some things I wish I could definitely re-do. Especially having the knowledge I have now.
You can only do what you do. If you want to rejoin, is there a way? or are you too old? or ...I mean, if you are a fit person, with something to offer, why couldn't you?

I plan on getting back into law enforcement after a few more years of my current sweet gig.



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 07:31 PM
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Or, you could follow my fine example.

Be a 20 year old unqualified high school dropout with untreated bipolar disorder and extreme social anxiety.

Have a select few friends that, for the most part, ignore, ridicule and exclude you, be unemployed for a little over a year, have no money and have nothing go right for you.

Then, and only then you can attain winner status. I rule.



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 07:44 PM
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reply to post by Whine Flu
 


wow, your a winner too? hells yeah, we're on top of the world. and you like assassins creed. are you sure your not me. or am i you. you've stolen my life, id like it back. never mind keep it.

On Topic
thats not nearly enough info to analyze you buddy.

love and peace.

[edit on 13-11-2009 by M157yD4wn]



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 08:21 PM
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you said you worked on the line, me too, for some time in an E-2 rag outfit. Then I got to do the "good" stuff. I don't know you or your "stance, but we did it all.
No promotions, upgrades, reccomends?



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 08:25 PM
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Originally posted by Whine Flu
Or, you could follow my fine example.

Be a 20 year old unqualified high school dropout with untreated bipolar disorder and extreme social anxiety.

Have a select few friends that, for the most part, ignore, ridicule and exclude you, be unemployed for a little over a year, have no money and have nothing go right for you.

Then, and only then you can attain winner status. I rule.




Funny, i know somebody just like you. I look at him everyday in the mirror. Only difference i didnt drop out of high school, but i have bi-polar, adhd, social anxiety.

[edit on 07/16/2009 by Lichter daraus]



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by Grayelf2009
 


Just thought of something that I wanted to add for humor's sake. Parts of your post (and the surprise you received once joining the Navy) reminded me of an old SNL skit. You know how the commercials to inspire people to join the military look so exciting? They show the servicemen and women working with missiles, high tech machines, or stationed at some exotic location?

Well, the SNL skit went like this:

Join the Navy!
*Show picture of recruits scrubbing a toilet with a toothbrush*

Join the Navy!
*Show picture of recruits peeling potatoes in the galley*

Join the Navy!
*Show picture of recruits swabbing a ship deck with a mop*.

They don't show that in their ads! lol



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 10:35 PM
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Sounds familiar the whole turn back the clock thing... But then that wouldn't be life, would it?

As for analysing you, as others have said, couldn't do it with just that snippet of Gray Elf. There's more to you than that, that's the life bit again. When I went through a similar quandry I spent 9 years searching for what I wanted to do, and thought I was meant to do, a feeling of destiny I suppose. Not all destinies have to be spectacular. I'm happy to say I'm on my way.

Life's like a game, but the best part is you can choose the conditions of victory. Gonads to the ill perceived ones.

Sendran.

[edit on 13/11/2009 by Sendran]



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 04:05 AM
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reply to post by AshleyD
 


We already have plenty of Obsessive-Compulsives in the Navy...THAT'S why they don't show that!! lol
(Yes I was Navy...)




posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by Grayelf2009
 


Perhaps a mild form of:

Stockholm syndrome is a psychological response sometimes seen in abducted hostages, in which the hostage shows signs of loyalty to the hostage-taker, regardless of the danger or risk in which they have been placed. The syndrome is named after the Norrmalmstorg robbery of Kreditbanken at Norrmalmstorg in Stockholm, in which the bank robbers held bank employees hostage from August 23 to August 28, 1973. In this case, the victims became emotionally attached to their captors, and even defended them after they were freed from their six-day ordeal. The term "Stockholm Syndrome" was coined by the criminologist and psychiatrist Nils Bejerot, who assisted the police during the robbery, and referred to the syndrome in a news broadcast.[1]

In 2007, a group of scholars studied twelve highly publicized cases of Stockholm syndrome, publishing their results in Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. They argued that, as the media accounts lacked "access to primary sources" or an "identification of a pattern of features exhibited in Stockholm syndrome," the characterization of any of these events as Stockholm syndrome could have been due to reporting bias.[2]

Stockholm syndrome is sometimes mistakenly referred to as Helsinki syndrome, due to confusing the two capitals.

SOURCE:en.wikipedia.org...

Or just plain old nostalgia?

The term nostalgia describes a longing for the past, often in idealized form.[1] The word is a learned formation of a Greek compound, consisting of νόστος, nóstos, "returning home", a Homeric word, and άλγος, álgos, "pain" or "ache". It was described as a medical condition, a form of melancholy, in the Early Modern period, and came to be an important topic in Romanticism.[1]

In common, less clinical usage, nostalgia includes a general interest in past eras and their personalities and events, especially the "good old days" of a few generations back recast in an idyllic light, such as the Belle Époque, Merry England, Neo-Victorian aesthetics, the US "Antebellum" Old South, etc. Sometimes it is brought on by a sudden image, or rememberance of something from one's childhood.

SOURCE:en.wikipedia.org...




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