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*Sin* The Moon God

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posted on Nov, 12 2009 @ 11:51 PM
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I've been thinking a lot lately about sin since I hear so many people talk about it. What exactly is sin? Why do so many people have so many definitions for sin? How does a person know when he/she is sinning? I've noticed that some actions that are deemed acceptable in one culture but are not acceptable in another are oftentimes considered sins by the culture that takes offense to those particular actions. So, I decided to do some research on sin, and I came up with some fascinating information. Once upon a time, there was an ancient semitic moon god called Nanna/Su'en/Sin, and he was represented by the crescent moon. Archaeologists have dug up many statues, tablets, temples, and carvings of Sin in the Middle East. This isn't mainstream news, so is it possible that it's being suppressed for whatever reason?

When the Bible talks about sin, is it really referring to worship of the pagan moon god? When the Bible says that the wages of sin is death, could that mean that to worship Sin, the moon god, was a crime punishable by death in those times?




* The moon god

Throughout the Middle East, from Egypt to Persia, the golden calf represented the moon god, so when the Israelites worshiped golden calves, we know this was the moon god. C. L. Woolley found several images of golden calves in his excavations of the royal graves at Ur. That these images are of the moon god can be seen a description found in a Sumero-Akkadian hymn to that god: 'Ferocious bull, whose horn is thick, whose legs are perfected, who is bearded in lapsis, and filled with luxury and abundance.' In Exodus, the Hebrews built a golden calf, which Moses is said to have destroyed. In 1 Kings chapter 12, we find that the King Jeroboam made two calves of gold, setting one up in Bethel and one in Dan. He made priests and ordained a national feast day to the god symbolized by these calves, and the people came to worship. From this it can be seen that, under Jeroboam, the moon god was the national god of Israel.

* The sun god

In Exodus, Joshua is said to have fought against the Amaleks, while Moses held up his hand until the sun went down. Arguably, this passage is based on an early sun god myth. Verse 17:1 says that they had journeyed from the wilderness of Sin. Sin was the Semitic moon god, so the wilderness of Sin was night time - when the moon god was in control. Joshua could only prevail while Moses held up his hand and the sun was up - the sun god was in control. Note that verses 17:2-7, in which Moses tapped a rock to obtain water, seem to have been inserted out of order, thus breaking the link between the moon god and the battle. The Book of Ezekiel, verse 8:16 says: 'And he brought me into the inner court of the Lord's house, and behold, at the door of the temple of the Lord, between the porch and the altar, were about five and twenty men, with their backs toward the temple of the Lord, and their faces toward the east; and they worshiped the sun toward the east'.

What Gods Did The Ancient Hebrews Worship?






He is commonly designated as En-zu, or "lord of wisdom." During the period (c.2600-2400 BC) that Ur exercised a large measure of supremacy over the Euphrates valley, Sin was naturally regarded as the head of the pantheon. It is to this period that we must trace such designations of Sin as "father of the gods", "chief of the gods", "creator of all things", and the like. The "wisdom" personified by the moon-god is likewise an expression of the science of astrology, in which the observation of the moon's phases is an important factor.

His wife was Ningal ("Great Lady"), who bore him Utu/Shamash ("Sun") and Inanna/Ishtar (the planet Venus). The tendency to centralize the powers of the universe leads to the establishment of the doctrine of a triad consisting of Sin/Nanna and his children.

Sin had a beard made of lapis lazuli and rode on a winged bull. The bull was one of his symbols, through his father, Enlil, "Bull of Heaven", along with the crescent and the tripod (which may be a lamp-stand). On cylinder seals, he is represented as an old man with a flowing beard and the crescent symbol. In the astral-theological system he is represented by the number 30 and the moon. This number probably refers to the average number of days (correctly around 29.53) in a lunar month, as measured between successive new moons.

An important Sumerian text ("Enlil and Ninlil")[2] tells of the descent of Enlil and Ninlil, pregnant with Nanna/Suen, into the underworld. There, three "substitutions" are given to allow the ascent of Nanna/Suen. The story shows some similarities to the text known as "The Descent of Inanna".

Wikipedia Sin Mythology



This site goes as far as suggesting that the muslim god, Allah, is the moon god, Sin.




In ancient Syria and Canna, the Moon-god Sin was usually represented by the moon in its crescent phase. At times the full moon was placed inside the crescent moon to emphasize all the phases of the moon. The sun-goddess was the wife of Sin and the stars were their daughters. For example, Istar was a daughter of Sin. Sacrifices to the Moon-god are described in the Pas Shamra texts. In the Ugaritic texts, the Moon-god was sometimes called Kusuh. In Persia, as well as in Egypt, the Moon- god is depicted on wall murals and on the heads of statues. He was the Judge of men and gods. The Old Testament constantly rebuked the worship of the Moon-god (see: Deut. 4:19;17:3; II Kngs. 21:3,5; 23:5; Jer. 8:2; 19:13; Zeph. 1:5, etc.) When Israel fell into idolatry, it was usually the cult of the Moon-god. As a matter of fact, everywhere in the ancient world, the symbol of the crescent moon can be found on seal impressions, steles, pottery, amulets, clay tablets, cylinders, weights, earrings, necklaces, wall murals, etc. In Tell-el-Obeid, a copper calf was found with a crescent moon on its forehead. An idol with the body of a bull and the head of man has a crescent moon inlaid on its forehead with shells. In Ur, the Stela of Ur-Nammu has the crescent symbol placed at the top of the register of gods because the Moon-god was the head of the gods. Even bread was baked in the form of a crescent as an act of devotion to the Moon-god.



cont.




posted on Nov, 12 2009 @ 11:59 PM
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A temple of the Moon-god has been excavated in Ur by Sir Leonard Woolley. He dug up many examples of moon worship in Ur and these are displayed in the British Museum to this day. Harran was likewise noted for its devotion to the Moon-god. In the 1950's a major temple to the Moon-god was excavated at Hazer in Palestine. Two idols of the moon god were found. Each was a stature of a man sitting upon a throne with a crescent moon carved on his chest . The accompanying inscriptions make it clear that these were idols of the Moon-god. Several smaller statues were also found which were identified by their inscriptions as the "daughters" of the Moon-god. What about Arabia? As pointed out by Prof. Coon, "Muslims are notoriously loath to preserve traditions of earlier paganism and like to garble what pre-Islamic history they permit to survive in anachronistic terms."

During the nineteenth century, Amaud, Halevy and Glaser went to Southern Arabia and dug up thousands of Sabean, Minaean, and Qatabanian inscriptions which were subsequently translated. In the 1940's, the archeologists G. Caton Thompson and Carleton S. Coon made some amazing discoveries in Arabia. During the 1950's, Wendell Phillips, W.F. Albright, Richard Bower and others excavated sites at Qataban, Timna, and Marib (the ancient capital of Sheba). Thousands of inscriptions from walls and rocks in Northern Arabia have also been collected. Reliefs and votive bowls used in worship of the "daughters of Allah" have also been discovered. The three daughters, al-Lat, al-Uzza and Manat are sometimes depicted together with Allah the Moon-god represented by a crescent moon above them. The archeological evidence demonstrates that the dominant religion of Arabia was the cult of the Moon-god.

In Old Testament times, Nabonidus (555-539 BC), the last king of Babylon, built Tayma, Arabia as a center of Moon-god worship. Segall stated, "South Arabia's stellar religion has always been dominated by the Moon-god in various variations." Many scholars have also noticed that the Moon-god's name "Sin" is a part of such Arabic words as "Sinai," the "wilderness of Sin," etc. When the popularity of the Moon-god waned elsewhere, the Arabs remained true to their conviction that the Moon-god was the greatest of all gods. While they worshipped 360 gods at the Kabah in Mecca, the Moon-god was the chief deity. Mecca was in fact built as a shrine for the Moon-god.

This is what made it the most sacred site of Arabian paganism. In 1944, G. Caton Thompson revealed in her book, The Tombs and Moon Temple of Hureidha, that she had uncovered a temple of the Moon-god in southern Arabia. The symbols of the crescent moon and no less than twenty-one inscriptions with the name Sin were found in this temple. An idol which may be the Moon-god himself was also discovered. This was later confirmed by other well-known archeologists.

The evidence reveals that the temple of the Moon-god was active even in the Christian era. Evidence gathered from both North and South Arabia demonstrate that Moon-god worship was clearly active even in Muhammad's day and was still the dominant cult. According to numerous inscriptions, while the name of the Moon-god was Sin, his title was al- ilah, i.e. "the deity," meaning that he was the chief or high god among the gods. As Coon pointed out, "The god Il or Ilah was originally a phase of the Moon God." The Moon-god was called al- ilah, i.e. the god, which was shortened to Allah in pre-Islamic times. The pagan Arabs even used Allah in the names they gave to their children. For example, both Muhammad's father and uncle had Allah as part of their names.

The fact that they were given such names by their pagan parents proves that Allah was the title for the Moon-god even in Muhammad's day. Prof. Coon goes on to say, "Similarly, under Mohammed's tutelage, the relatively anonymous Ilah, became Al-Ilah, The God, or Allah, the Supreme Being."



Is it possible that we have been confused or mislead about the origin of sin this whole time? Is there no such thing as sin as we understand it? Does it all boil down to a sect of the ancient Hebrews trying to squash the leading pagan deity of the time in favor of establishing a new religion by making worship of one of their greatest gods, Sin, evil? That was the same tactic that was used for all of the other pagan gods in the Christian era. What are your thoughts?




[edit on 13-11-2009 by gazerstar]



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 12:55 AM
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Sin is the English word for it. What is the Hebrew word for sin? (For that matter, is Sin a transliteration of the name?)



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 01:00 AM
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You've got some good points there. I've yet to make up my mind on the actual importance of Sin as a moon God, but i think it has a lot to do with the fact that Sin (Nanna) was the son of Enlil, who was ofcourse the brother of Enki. There seems to have been a lot of rivalry between the God's in many ancient myths.



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 01:10 AM
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reply to post by Rivyolie
 


In greek, it's hamartia in the abstract (he sinned, that is sinful) and hamartema in the concrete (that is a sin)

In latin, it is "culpa"

In Hebrew, it's complicated - there are several words in the Hebrew texts that have been translated as sin, the most common is ra'ah, "evil" or "bad" with implications of "contrary to god." The word is a cognate with the Arabic word, "haram", "unclean". Hebrew also has "het" which is more along the lines of "missing the mark, to err." In Aramaic the word is "hobha" meaning both "sin" and "debt"

"Sin" is a thoroughly Germanic word, inherited from the Old English synn, itself a derivative of an older Germanic root "sunjo"



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 01:12 AM
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Anything is possible in an existence as remarkably misunderstood as ours.

I'd say the english word(sin) isn't going to lead to any definitive answers about the original word and its meaning/usage.



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 01:17 AM
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פשע

That's the hebrew word for it.

I think its something like Pei-sin-ayin.

The second letter in the word.... is Shin:

Shin (also spelled Šin (šīn) or Sheen) is the twenty-first letter in many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician 𐤔, Aramaic/Hebrew ש, and Arabic ﺵ (in abjadi order, 13th in modern order).

Interesting...

[edit on 13-11-2009 by GioTheGreek]



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 02:01 AM
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Makes sense. Wonder if that's where the old tale about "monster's" and people behaving badly when a full moon is present?



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 02:04 AM
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Originally posted by GioTheGreek
פשע

That's the hebrew word for it.

I think its something like Pei-sin-ayin.

The second letter in the word.... is Shin:

Shin (also spelled Šin (šīn) or Sheen) is the twenty-first letter in many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician 𐤔, Aramaic/Hebrew ש, and Arabic ﺵ (in abjadi order, 13th in modern order).

Interesting...

[edit on 13-11-2009 by GioTheGreek]


Yup, you've got the letters right.

The word is (transliterated to Roman script, of course) PShA - the A at the end is rough, 'cause the actual sound doesn't exist in english - Imagine the sound "augh" and you're in the neighborhood.

However, PShA is used only 41 time in the bible. It's a "primitive" root (imagine the difference between modern english and middle english) meaning to transgress or revolt.

[edit on 13-11-2009 by TheWalkingFox]



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 04:34 PM
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Very good. Thanks for taking time to put together a great post.

I had never hear any of this before. S & F



posted on Nov, 13 2009 @ 08:09 PM
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The English word sin derives from Old English synn, recorded in use as early as the 9th century. It was an archery term that meant to miss the mark. That's what we do when we fall short of Gods will.

As far as Sin the moon god he is one and the same as Allah.

worship of the Sumerian moon god named "Sin" Notice the crescent moon which is still used today in Islam.

Check this research: www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 04:43 AM
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reply to post by Bigwhammy
 

Hey Whammy!

I had read that other thread before also, and let it go then, but since you bring up the point here as well, I thought I might as well address it.

The usage of the crescent moon as a symbol in Islamic countries isn't because of some secret coverup moon worship. Fact of the matter is that the Crescent moon was introduced into Muslim iconography by the turks, and before that, no muslim people used it as their symbol. It certainly has no connection to any ancient moon-good Sin (and I'm not sure how you connected Sin to Allah either, actually).

[edit on 14-11-2009 by babloyi]



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 06:12 AM
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Maybe it is one of those TIME SLIP things.
I know that culpa is the Latin word that corresponds with the translation, but the Latin word SIN means without.
DO WITHOUT

and if the shoe fits, I tend to wear it. I am not a believer in doing without.
I don't believe in sin.



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 07:07 AM
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reply to post by babloyi
 


Allah is demonstrably the moon god.

It's all in the research forum:here but here is some of the pertinent info:


Allah, the moon god, was married to the sun goddess. Together they produced three goddesses who were called "the daughters of Allah." These three goddesses were called Al-Lat, Al-Uzza, and Manat. The daughters of Allah, along with Allah and the sun goddess were viewed as "high" gods. That is, they were viewed as being at the top of the pantheon of Arabian deities. (Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, I:61).


Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, Third Edition, Facts on File Publishing, 2008.


Mecca the home of the Ka’aba, a cube that houses a black meteorite fetish, was the center of all pagan religions of Arabia. AI-Ilah, the moon god - lord of the Ka'aba, ruled over 360 idols at the Ka’aba. Pagan polytheists in Saudi Arabia, before Muhammad, worshiped toward Mecca because it was where their idols were located. All of this was in place long before Muhammad came on the scene. Traditions which are carried on to this day in Islam.

What Muhammad did was repackage his native religion into a monotheistic form by elevating the central moon god Allah to “the god”.




The Bedouin's astral beliefs centred upon the moon, in whose light he grazed his flocks. Moon-worship implies a pastoral society, whereas sun-worship represents a later agricultural stage. In our own day the Moslem Ruwalah Bedouins imagine that their life is regulated by the moon, which condenses the water vapours, distils the beneficent dew on the pasture and makes possible the growth of plants. On the other hand the sun, as they believe, would like to destroy the Bedouins as well as all animal and plant life. (Hitti)


Hitti, Philip K. History Of The Arabs, LONDON MACMILLAN & CO LTD, ST MARTIN'S PRESS1956, p 96-101.



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 07:13 AM
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reply to post by Bigwhammy
 

Hey Whammy!
Good to see you. As I mentioned, I had read that thread of yours before, and disagreed with a number of things, which is partially the reason for me to create this thread just now (minutes ago!).

Since it only deals with a small portion of your research thread (and a small portion of the point of this thread), I decided to separate it, for neatness. I've responded to the stuff you mentioned here (as well as in your original thread), so I'd welcome your input there (or here, if you insist
).

[edit on 14-11-2009 by babloyi]



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 07:14 AM
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reply to post by hadriana
 


Its not from the Latin, sin in the English translation of the bible comes form synn an archery term which means to miss the mark.



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 07:21 AM
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reply to post by babloyi
 


I don't trust Islamic sources. Islamic apologists try to distance themselves because they would have us believe that Allah is the creator God of the Bible and that Islam is a religion of peace, both politically correct absurdities.

My research is documented thoroughly and traces moon god worship from the Tower of Babel all the way to Islam.



posted on Nov, 14 2009 @ 10:14 PM
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reply to post by Bigwhammy
 


In other words, you're more willing to believe lies because they fit your personal political agenda.

'Course, given that Jews and Christians are worshiping a Canaanite mountain god, it's not like they have any room to jostle, is it?


[edit on 14-11-2009 by TheWalkingFox]



posted on Nov, 16 2009 @ 10:50 PM
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reply to post by gazerstar
 


Sin comes from O.E. Synn, as seen in Norwegian Synd. Ultimately it derives from the same word as a an Norse word meaning true - Sannr. And probably mixed with the word meaning angry - Sinna. As it is proven (true) that you are guilty. Look it up by following the link below:

www.etymonline.com...

[edit on 16/11/2009 by Neo Christian Mystic]



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 05:10 PM
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reply to post by gazerstar
 


pious frauds continue even in this age.

Read the Qur'an. you will find that Allah claims the moon and the sun are his Creations for the benefit of Mankind. then come and post here.

Most of you have neither read the Qu'ran (and never will) nor studied the life of the Prophet yet you are willing to surrender your thinking skills to dubious "scholars." Does anyone know how many books have been written against Islam from every vantage point by the West slandering ridiculing and vilifying this great religion?

The Sun and moon are creations of Allah, as Allah himself has revealed in the Qur'an. the false propaganda by vested (usually christian missionary) interests exists to divert attention away from the One uncreated Creator of the Universe.

Yes paganism and worship of millions of dieties existed in Arabia and around the Med. Muhammad put an end to idolatry. He did not put all the "gods" into one melting pot and call it Allah.

the name Allah is a proper noun and the personal name for God the Creator. Try Aramaic the language of Jesus and you will find that the word for God is Allaha.

But then you educated guys know better dont you. Keep your eyes wide shut to the truth till one day you will have to open them.



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