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Key oil figures were distorted by US pressure, says whistleblower

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posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by Goathief
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


You are confusing different issues - fossil fuels in general will be OK, coal, natural gas, etc. The problem is with liquid fuel, as it says in this report summary (written by the lead author):



Not confused just well read on the topic.

All fossil fuels include- Oil, Coal and Natural gas. I liked how you side stepped the natural gas and Coal reserves. We are going to see a rather large increase of oil not a decrease. Central Asian oil has not really come online yet, also more of the industrialized nations are headed green further lowering the growth rate.


Remember these reports were compiled well before the 2007 economic downturn, so how can they be scare-tactics conjured up recently to drive up prices during it?


This has been known for decades, Way before your 2007 referenced date.

Also I was replying to your News article source date.
Monday 9 November 2009 21.30 GMT




posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69

All fossil fuels include- Oil, Coal and Natural gas. I liked how you side stepped the natural gas and Coal reserves. We are going to see a rather large increase of oil not a decrease.


Thanks, but if you'd read the Hirsch report you'd understand that the issue is not with fossil fuels in general, just the liquid ones and how they are essential to our society. As I highlighted previously, please post independent projections and reports that confirm oil supplies to the west will increase indefinitely. I can't find any at all.

This would indicate the whistleblowers are speaking the truth, correct?



[edit on 11-11-2009 by Goathief]



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by Goathief

But it's not just that article is it? In fact the more I read into it the more I'm convinced there's problems. People only presenting evidence that is supplied by the alleged corrupt ones is not the best way to go about discovering the truth. Since I've been looking I've yet to find one independent investigation that isn't concerned about oil or rather, the lack of it. That should speak volumes in itself.


You won't ever run out of 'independent' investigations that don't have an agenda. Some of them might even give an interpretation of their findings that are close to the truth but they won't ever give you the whole picture.

As far as information coming from the big money, big oil and big politics, ....it's all about the revenues. Yes they lie, but their lies are based on making more money, not less.

If oil were as short as your source claims then we'd be paying higherfuel prices, higher taxes and lending would be done at higher interest rates. Instead. the price of oil is low enough lately that mid east countries are asking for the west to artificially inflate prices for them.

Another thing to look into is the fact that we get most of our oil from Canada and that's coming from oil sands as well as drilled sources. They've got enough oil sands up there to keep North America going for the next century. It's just more expensive to extract. Then there is the fact that we can only drill in a small portion of the GOM but the atlantic and pacific coasts are off limits. Then there's Alaska, the continental US and Mexico will be looking to sell some oil.
After we go through all of that there are massive natural gas reserves. Did you know that most of the cars in Austrlia run on gasoline AND natural or lp gas? True. They can pull up to the station and fill two tanks, one with each type, and use both without any mechanical changes.
We have a great deal of fossil fuels left. We don't need to continue burning them. It would make more sense to go to different forms of energy and transit just for efficiency and enviromental health but that wouldn't make the big guys as much money in the long run would it?


So, let's keep telling everybody that the world is going to run out of oil tomorrow. We've got to keep those prices shored up. Dozens of Saudi Princes and their extended families are counting on new Rolls Royces this year.



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:09 PM
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Originally posted by Goathief

This would indicate the whistleblowers are speaking the truth, correct?



No.

There is sweat crude [Middle East/Central Asia/Russia] and then there is what we in the west have tons of here in the west. As the Sweat crude dries up they'll have to fall back on the less desirable and more expensive to refine [sour crude]


Some of the common reference crudes are:

* West Texas Intermediate (WTI), a very high-quality, sweet, light oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma for North American oil

* Brent Blend, comprising 15 oils from fields in the Brent and Ninian systems in the East Shetland Basin of the North Sea. The oil is landed at Sullom Voe terminal in the Shetlands. Oil production from Europe, Africa and Middle Eastern oil flowing West tends to be priced off this oil, which forms a benchmark

* Dubai-Oman, used as benchmark for Middle East sour crude oil flowing to the Asia-Pacific region

* Tapis (from Malaysia, used as a reference for light Far East oil)

* Minas (from Indonesia, used as a reference for heavy Far East oil)

* The OPEC Reference Basket, a weighted average of oil blends from various OPEC (The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) countries

There are declining amounts of these benchmark oils being produced each year, so other oils are more commonly what is actually delivered. While the reference price may be for West Texas Intermediate delivered at Cushing, the actual oil being traded may be a discounted Canadian heavy oil delivered at Hardisty, Alberta, and for a Brent Blend delivered at the Shetlands, it may be a Russian Export Blend delivered at the port of Primorsk.[19]



We will be using more and more electric vehicles so Oil wont be that big of an issue in the next few decades. that's exactly why the Saudi's are up in arms about compensation. Most of that electric energy will be produced by newer Coal, Solar and Wind plants. People are still weary of Nuclear.
Also

Source

In its strictest sense, petroleum includes only crude oil, but in common usage it includes both crude oil and natural gas. Both crude oil and natural gas are predominantly a mixture of hydrocarbons. Under surface pressure and temperature conditions, the lighter hydrocarbons methane, ethane, propane and butane occur as gases, while the heavier ones from pentane and up are in the form of liquids or solids.

However, in the underground oil reservoir the proportion which is gas or liquid varies depending on the subsurface conditions, and on the phase diagram of the petroleum mixture.[2]



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:11 PM
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Dang, knew I should of bought that oil stock.



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by MorfeuZ
 


We have been consuming oil for over 100 years now. There are 6 billion people on the planet. We now use over 85 MILLION barrels of oil per day.

How much oil do you think a planet that is only 25,000 miles around contains?



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by MorfeuZ
 


We have been consuming oil for over 100 years now. There are 6 billion people on the planet. We now use over 85 MILLION barrels of oil per day.

How much oil do you think a planet that is only 25,000 miles around contains?


That's the problem...

We have been brain washed into thinking that OIL is our only source of energy. We've been sold on that Idea by our Government and Big Business. When in reality if we look at it through the use of Alternative technologies we are in no danger of a crises. The key is the Switch from oil to alternatives.



The crucial first step in the global clean energy transition

How do we devise a global plan for energy transition? Rather than a whole plan, let's start with the crucial first step:

We need an immediate moratorium on the construction of new traditional coal plants. That is a higher priority than a cap & trade bill, although such a bill is also a high priority. If the West cannot stop building such coal plants and quickly show the world that multiple alternatives -- particularly efficiency and renewables -- are practical and affordable, then how will we be able to convince the developing world, especially China and India, to stop building such coal plants within the decade?


It is the coal without carbon capture and storage that poses the greatest threat to humankind:


[edit on 11-11-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Interesting turnabout from, "there is no problem" to, "that's the problem"!


That is exactly the point the Hirsch report makes, we are not in a position to make the switch over and if there is a crysis (note, this doesn't mean running out of oil, just the expense involved in getting it) followed by a swift collapse as evidenced in the UK previously we are in deep, deep trouble.

I'm running out of time to research this subject today but I will be reading further - still waiting for any evidence from outside of those accused of conspiracy and corruption! Surely there must be one...




posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:35 PM
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is this true or is socalled whistleblower blowing smoke up our tailpipes to push up gas prices. think about it we know there is oil of north america east coast there are purposely untapped oil fields in north carolina . i believe this is just some plan to jack up gas prices



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:37 PM
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Originally posted by Zosynspiracy
Maybe the pace of life will slow down a little bit and maybe population won't grow at such a break neck speed............

HUH? I thought sex was the reason for population growth. Didn't know gas had anything to do with it.
A lot of us knew this a long time ago, but no one listened. Same stuff, different day.



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by Goathief
 


OK in a nutshell there is no danger of running out of oil anytime soon!

Do we the "WEST" want to be held hostage to foreign oil? If you think this is the first time that oil prices and the [reserves] issues have been manipulated to serve big business then you are either young or have not researched it as I have. This game has been going on for more than 60+ years.

I for one have had it with paying more at the pump every time there is a dip in the market.


The New Great Game

The new Great Game Crude oil, once seen as a wealth-creating blessing for mankind, is fast turning into the “devil’s tears”. The struggle to control the world’s remaining energy reserves increasingly culminates in bloody conflicts and the killing of innocent civilians, with the war in Iraq only being the latest example.

In The New Great Game, Central Asia, known as the "black hole of the earth" for much of the last century. The Caspian Sea contains the world’s largest amount of untapped oil and gas resources. It is estimated that there might be as much as one hundred billion barrels of crude oil in the former Soviet republics of Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan alone.



Central Asian oil
The oil reserves there shrink the gulf states to nothing. It will be the flash point of the future.

Undoubtedly Central Asia’s strategic importance in international affairs
is growing. The rivalries among Russia, China, United States, Iran, India,
and Pakistan not to mention the ever-changing pattern of relations among
local states (five former Soviet republics and Afghanistan) make the region’s
importance obviously clear. Central Asia's strategic importance for Washington, Moscow, and Beijing varies with each nation’s perception of its strategic interests.

Washington focuses primarily on Central Asia as an important theater in the war on terrorism. Additionally, it is viewed as a theater where America might counter a revived Russia or China, or a place to blunt any extension of Iranian influence. Moscow and Beijing view the region as a vital locale for defending critical domestic interests. This asymmetry of interest is




[edit on 11-11-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Nov, 12 2009 @ 03:51 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by MorfeuZ
 


We have been consuming oil for over 100 years now. There are 6 billion people on the planet. We now use over 85 MILLION barrels of oil per day.

How much oil do you think a planet that is only 25,000 miles around contains?


In addition 25% of the nett energy daily is consumed by the US alone, yet the US has only 6% of the population.

Remember the Earth is a closed system what we have is all we get, regardless of statements dithering over 5, 10 or even 25 years don't we think that our children and grandchildren deserve the same or better than today?



posted on Nov, 12 2009 @ 04:03 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
We need an immediate moratorium on the construction of new traditional coal plants. That is a higher priority than a cap & trade bill, although such a bill is also a high priority. If the West cannot stop building such coal plants and quickly show the world that multiple alternatives -- particularly efficiency and renewables -- are practical and affordable, then how will we be able to convince the developing world, especially China and India, to stop building such coal plants within the decade?

It is the coal without carbon capture and storage that poses the greatest threat to humankind:


[edit on 11-11-2009 by SLAYER69]

China is currently building and bringing online almost two power stations Every Week

quote
China is the dominant player. The country is on track to add 562 coal-fired plants - nearly half the world total of plants expected to come online in the next eight years. India could add 213such plants; the US, 72.

"Environmental optimists were assuming the world was going to switch to gas, but when you're short of gas you use your own coal," says Philip Andrews-Speed, a China energy expert at the University of Dundee, in Scotland. "What you're seeing with China and the others is the cheapness and security of coal just overwhelming the desire to be clean."
end quote



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