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The US Healthcare System ... it's sick, sick, sick

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posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by Philalethes
 


12.5k per year for a family of 4? Not bad. I currently pay @4.5k per year just for me. And I live and work in Germany which already has socialized medicine!
Be careful what you wish for America. You just might get it.




posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by The Baby Seal Club
reply to post by Philalethes
 


12.5k per year for a family of 4? Not bad. I currently pay @4.5k per year just for me. And I live and work in Germany which already has socialized medicine!
Be careful what you wish for America. You just might get it.


It's over $15,000 for a family of four - up 131% in ten years

At this rate of inflation (which is rising still) the cost will be $71,000 +/- for a family of four in the year 2029 at the 131% per ten year increase...

its like people here are unwilling to do some simple math...



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 06:48 PM
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Okay, lets just clear up a few things. I shall give you the example of how the UK's NHS works.

The taxpayer and employer both pay a % of their salary through HM Customs & Excise to the UK Government towards their National Insurance. This is then allocated to various Health & Social Departments; ie; NHS, Benefits, Unemployment money etc etc. Employers make a NI contribution on your behalf as well.

Basic rate tax = 20% on taxable income up to £37,400.
Higher rate tax = 40% on taxable income over £37,400.

Average UK salary (2006) = £22,248.

Most average UK taxpayers pay approximately 1/3 of their salaries to the Government in direct taxation.

You are allocated a NHS number at birth - this stays with you for life. You would normally register with a GP near to your home, though you can nowadays register with any GP practice. Like all GP's, they look after your general health needs and virtually all are NHS. GP's can refer you to Consultants and hospitals if and when it is necessary, including specialised hospitals. This is all paid for from taxpayers contributions to the NI fund and other taxes.

You do NOT individually pay doctors, hospitals or drug companies. They are all paid for by Government. Doctors and other health professionals are salaried and paid for by the Government - Department of Health.

There is however a small prescription charge on medications of £7.20 per prescription - some people are exempt however. Medications given during a hospital stay are paid for by the Government. You do not pay anything during your stay in hospital or for tests etc etc.

There are private healthcare facilities, but you would pay for them either by cash, credit or private insurance. You will stay pay for the NHS/NI - there is no opt out of this.

I hope the above has helped a bit.

The NHS is not perfect by any means (what healthcare system is) but it is fair, available to ALL citizens (including foreigners that are visiting) and good value for money. Above all, it is loved by most UK citizens and woe betide any politician that trys to get rid of it.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by Wotan
 

GEE

you can come here and pay $270 for a tube of anti fungal cream or $18,000 for some chemo therapy



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by Janky Red
 


Prices are skyrocketing all over the world, not just in the states. But as it CURRENTLY stands, Philalethes is paying LESS for health care than I am (per person). And he's getting a private room and great treatment, while I'm stuck with rationed care.

I'd rather have the American system than the German one.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:16 PM
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Originally posted by The Baby Seal Club
reply to post by Janky Red
 


Prices are skyrocketing all over the world, not just in the states. But as it CURRENTLY stands, Philalethes is paying LESS for health care than I am (per person). And he's getting a private room and great treatment, while I'm stuck with rationed care.

I'd rather have the American system than the German one.


I guess I was trying to point out that $71,000 a year is more than what most make here and time is marching on...
When I get sick with an URI respiratory infection - I have to go to the fish store to get access to anti biotics. My friend just payed $250 for 2 ounces of foot creme and he was insured and had prescription benefits.

What do you pay for a prescription there?



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by Janky Red
 


Do you know they sell antibiotics at WalMart for $4?

But I do applaud your creativity.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by Janky Red
 


Prescriptions? That is one place where I definitely have it better than you guys in the states. My wife pays @$60 a month for heart and thyroid medication. A lot cheaper than in the states. But we tend to pay more for normal over-the-counter non-prescription medication. Ex. I just recently bought a large bottle of Vicks cold medication. It costs me over $15.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by Janky Red
 


Prescriptions? That is one place where I definitely have it better than you guys in the states. My wife pays @$60 a month for heart and thyroid medication. A lot cheaper than in the states. But we tend to pay more for normal over-the-counter non-prescription medication. Ex. I just recently bought a large bottle of Vicks cold medication. It costs me over $15.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:34 PM
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Originally posted by Wotan

Basic rate tax = 20% on taxable income up to £37,400.
Higher rate tax = 40% on taxable income over £37,400.

Average UK salary (2006) = £22,248.



Thanks for the info Wotan.

I believe my calcs are correct in converting this to USD:

Basic rate tax = 20% on taxable income up to $55,529
Higher rate tax = 40% on taxable income over $55,529

I have a very good insurance policy that covers medical, dental and vision care and will cover up to $1.75M for any single event should my family need it. I currently pay, on average, $11,000 per year for all medical expenses, prescriptions AND insurance premiums for a family of 4 (my employer pays a portion of the premium). By my calculations, if I lived in the UK with the same income I would be paying $38,000 per year for what I now pay $11,000 per year for. Granted, my medical expenses vary from year to year and, God forbid, if someone in my family should need extensive care, my portion would be very expensive but the annual savings of $27,000 per year ($38,000 minus $11,000) for the years that something drastic doesn't happen would more than offset it.

Seems like a no brainer at least in my situation.





[edit on 7/11/2009 by Iamonlyhuman]



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:46 PM
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Originally posted by HotSauce
reply to post by Janky Red
 


Do you know they sell antibiotics at WalMart for $4?

But I do applaud your creativity.


You need a prescription - which takes seeing a doctor out of pocket and urgent care which can cost as much as my food and gas for a month.

You take too much of that stuff from the fish store and you will pee blood - however it works really well if you get the dosing right. You have to think of your body as a fish tank, volume and all...



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by The Baby Seal Club
reply to post by Janky Red
 


Prescriptions? That is one place where I definitely have it better than you guys in the states. My wife pays @$60 a month for heart and thyroid medication. A lot cheaper than in the states. But we tend to pay more for normal over-the-counter non-prescription medication. Ex. I just recently bought a large bottle of Vicks cold medication. It costs me over $15.


Ya you got ripped on the VIC's -

My fathers anti nausea medicine was $12,000 for 30 pills (2007) - un fortunately his vomiting from chemo was making him pop blood vessels which could have lead to clotting and heart failure. Insurance covered $2,000 of it -
This one med tacked on $50,000 to the final bill post insurance after a three year battle.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by Janky Red
 


Wow that sucks. So where I live a doctors visit or urgent care is like $90. How much is it where you live? Plus, if you explain to most doctors here that you do not have insurance they will take cash and ususally cut the bill in at leat half.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by Iamonlyhuman
 


It does depend on income v taxes. Just remember though, you are not paying for family members under the UK system. Each taxpayer pays for themselves - children, OAP's and unemployed do not pay.

It is true that the more you earn, the more you pay.

I beleive that it is actually 13% of gross income that goes to the NI contribution (dependent on income).

The approx. 1/3 of income to taxes goes on everything - Justice, Defence, Social Security, Education, State pension, etc etc.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by Wotan
 


In Germany it used to be that you didn't pay doctors or hospitals either. But now with rising costs and demands from the HMOs, we now have to pay for doctor visits and hospital stays. Granted, it's not much (less than what they pay in the states), but it still gets on my nerves because they (the govt.) are taking so much out of my paycheck and still making me pay more and more every year for less quality.
At least in the states you have the choice to opt out of the system, unlike here in Europe.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 08:01 PM
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Originally posted by HotSauce
reply to post by Janky Red
 


Wow that sucks. So where I live a doctors visit or urgent care is like $90. How much is it where you live? Plus, if you explain to most doctors here that you do not have insurance they will take cash and ususally cut the bill in at leat half.


Urgent care can be anywhere from $140 - $270 - the $140 dollar place
shut down and the last time I had to go it was $150 in and $120 in the mail ( strep throat test ) in order to prescribe the correct ABiotics.

I did pay $90 once but that was in 1999-00



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by The Baby Seal Club
 


They (Politicians) would not dare to impose Doctors call-out charges or hospital charges on the UK population ........ it would be political suicide. The UK's NHS is sacrosanct.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by Janky Red
 


Wow what part of the country do you live in. That is outrageous.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by Wotan
 


LOL!!!!
That's what they said in Germany 10 years ago.



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 08:14 PM
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Originally posted by HotSauce
reply to post by Janky Red
 


Wow what part of the country do you live in. That is outrageous.


It is...

Lets just say I live in a State that was barely beat out by Texas statewide premiums,
just barely...

Oh and now I am insured as of the last two months


so no more

www.google.com... =X&oi=product_catalog_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CBcQ8wIwAw#ps-sellers

Now they make capsules I see

[edit on 7-11-2009 by Janky Red]



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