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Man tased while his Crain Ave. home burns

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posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 07:11 AM
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some one needs to regulate the use of tasers for sure.
media.www.kentnewsnet.com...
How is it police never get into trouble? It really irks me how they are (supposedly)above reproach.They are only human,subject to the faults we all have abd should be held accountable.




posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 08:07 AM
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I'm a bit skeptical about this report. It would have us believe that this man was tased for no reason at all. I'm pretty sure that something is missing from the report. I'm not saying the tasing was justified, but that police don't just tase people for kicks. At least, not in public, with witnesses.

I think that when the rest of this story comes out, there will likely be some understandable reason why the man was tased. He must have done something - annoyed the police, said something rude, etc. - to get tased. Again, rudeness isn't a justification, but it would at least explain the behavior of the police.



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 08:16 AM
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Man tased while his Crain Ave. home burns


The report said that the tased homeowner applied 'psychological resistance'. This begs the question whether thinking is a crime today or whether this guy was trying to mind meld with them.

Either way, the police state electroshock therapy seemed like an excessive use of force, especially under the circumstances. I wonder what they would have done if he had asked them for their badge numbers?



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 08:29 AM
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reply to post by chiron613
 


Annoying the police is justification for being tased while your house burns?

Like maybe they thought he was whining?



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 08:35 AM
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I think that the no comment from the police dept. says a lot. If nothing else, even the P.D. officals are trying to figure out how to explain the officers report of psychological and physical active resistance B.S.



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 08:41 AM
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He probably wanted to go in for something.

I have never called the cops, fire department, 911 or any of that crap for anything ever. I handle what I can on my own and what I cant handle I deal with after the fact on my own.

Ever since I saw a guy get tackled and arrested for trying to get to his dog that fell through some ice, not very far from shore and it wasnt even that cold or deep, while the cops stood around doing nothing but watching the dog slowly die I realized calling them or any one of these "services" only works to make the situation worse.

Oh, after they arrested the guy and threatened to tase and arrest his wife and kids a firefighter finally came by walked in and got the dog and the dog was alright. But what should have been a 2 minute go and get the dog and go home and take a shower turned into a 2 hour authoritarian festival of abuse and stress and taxpayer expense because some idiot called the cops.



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by chiron613
I'm a bit skeptical about this report. It would have us believe that this man was tased for no reason at all. I'm pretty sure that something is missing from the report. I'm not saying the tasing was justified, but that police don't just tase people for kicks. At least, not in public, with witnesses.

I think that when the rest of this story comes out, there will likely be some understandable reason why the man was tased. He must have done something - annoyed the police, said something rude, etc. - to get tased. Again, rudeness isn't a justification, but it would at least explain the behavior of the police.



actually they do taser people just for kicks, for no reason at all

depending on how long you have been here on ats, or paying attention to non msm news, you'll have seen several and by that i mean possibly hundreds of cases where something like that has happened

its really quite pathetic





honestly i feel within the next 10 years, depending on how fast things accelerate and how bad things get or stay economically we will reach a peak with the police violence and the citizen anger

things will explode and while the police may be above punishment now, things wont last that way forever, i guarantee if things stay the way they are or get worse, there will be a day when people rise up again, just like what happened with rodney king

you never know what the incident will be, but there will be an incident where people say enough is enough and there will be riots.


i honestly feel though that if there are riots, it wont just be against the cities and society, it would be aimed more directly towards government and more specifically law enforcement



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 10:22 AM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
He probably wanted to go in for something.

I have never called the cops, fire department, 911 or any of that crap for anything ever. I handle what I can on my own and what I cant handle I deal with after the fact on my own.

Ever since I saw a guy get tackled and arrested for trying to get to his dog that fell through some ice, not very far from shore and it wasnt even that cold or deep, while the cops stood around doing nothing but watching the dog slowly die I realized calling them or any one of these "services" only works to make the situation worse.

Oh, after they arrested the guy and threatened to tase and arrest his wife and kids a firefighter finally came by walked in and got the dog and the dog was alright. But what should have been a 2 minute go and get the dog and go home and take a shower turned into a 2 hour authoritarian festival of abuse and stress and taxpayer expense because some idiot called the cops.



you have a voice, you should have stood up, you should have gone to the news, to the police headquarters and even your city leaders and let them know what you witnessed was not acceptable

nothing will ever come to these wrongdoers unless the good people who witness such atrocities speaks up



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by Dramey
 


That's the thing. According to everyone there it wasnt an 'atrocity.' Popular opinion was that the guy was making the situation unsafe and attempting to risk his own life to save the dog which would have resulted in another thing to rescue.

It's easy to speak up when something wrong actually happened. As far as 90% of the world goes nothing wrong happened and everything is fine and dandy.



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 12:37 PM
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Don't the police always say "intoxicated and combative" as an excuse to do whatever they want? If my house is burning down then you are either there to help me or get the **** out of my way. Don't even think of impeding me from going back in for family members of pets!

I'll be following this case to see how the judge rules. Kent Ohio has a history of draconian police abuses. This is the same police department that wanted to equip it officers with military M16 automatic rifles - you know, to keep rowdy students in line.



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 08:39 AM
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reply to post by Dramey
 






honestly i feel within the next 10 years, depending on how fast things accelerate and how bad things get or stay economically we will reach a peak with the police violence and the citizen anger

things will explode and while the police may be above punishment now, things wont last that way forever, i guarantee if things stay the way they are or get worse, there will be a day when people rise up again, just like what happened with rodney king

you never know what the incident will be, but there will be an incident where people say enough is enough and there will be riots.


Agreed 100% except for the King reference.

The only difference is, it wont be like the King riots. IMO it will be more focused on those responsible.

Sooner or later, it will happen. Things just aren't bad enough yet. We have had it easier than other places, like the UK for example. If our government did to us what their government has done to them, we'd be fighting right this very second. I believe our government knows that. And I believe our government fears us because of this. They know they are walking on very thin ice.

They will find out just how small their gang really is.



[edit on 6/11/09 by PSUSA]



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 08:43 AM
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reply to post by frankensence
 





This is the same police department that wanted to equip it officers with military M16 automatic rifles - you know, to keep rowdy students in line.


Don't worry about them. I've seen pigs shoot.


They love their toys. They just don't know how to use them.



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 08:53 AM
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Interesting history on kent state.

So he used psychological resistance? This does reek of thought crime.

edit: upon further reading this is stated to be the shifting of defense tactics from the force continuum from the threat matrix. It sounds like a way to validate and even excuse over action on the part of the police.

In essence a level one(this guy) should have been dealt with by a level two response. But what we're now seeing is a response of neutralization and disarmament. The threat level was below the response actions of the police if we use the threat matrix guide. The force continuum seems to rely on direct confrontation and neutralizing all perceived opposition.




For years, officers have been trained using what is called the force continuum. Recognized by the courts, the force continuum deals with what level of force an officer could and should use in any given situation. Levels of resistance are broken down into six categories. Levels of force are broken down into five categories. Police are trained with a “plus one” rule. Faced with a level one resistor (psychological resistance), officers could use a level two amount of force (verbal direction), according to the force continuum. The force continuum is being phased out in some circles, replaced with a threat matrix. The threat matrix takes into account time of day, the ambient light, the size and gender of the person being dealt with and the proximity of other officers. An officer faced with a potentially armed man would react differently depending on such factors as how close his nearest backup is, the size of the man, how visible the area is. It takes the cookie-cutter approach to the use of force to a new, more applicable level.


further reading: Police one pdf

[edit on 6-11-2009 by Seiko]



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