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Turn a 2-Liter bottle into a 50 watt lightbulb (w/ video)

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posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 11:19 AM
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I wonder when the research is going to be done with fiberoptic light amplification and dispersion. There is so much potential in it. Have a few wires that you can barely see collecting light during the day... Then have a secondary system for at night, turn on 1 really bright set of lights and have them dispersed across the house.

I love how ingenious this is... Basically he is doing a fiberoptic transference of the light... now America or China needs to get some scientists on this... theres no telling where fiberoptics and solar panels can take us




posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by AngelHeart
 


Yep pretty much. It's more useful for places you use during the day that need illumination. Like an interior room with no windows.

Or if you want to save on your electric bill in a place like a workshop. Instead of overhead lights, put these in instead.

Just a power saving feature.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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I really don't see anything in that invention beyond a simple skylight, and not optimal at that. It doesn't seem easy to keep the roof watertight once you drilled these pretty substantial wholes. Besides, if not properly fixed (which doesn't seem easy either) it's an accident hazard.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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I'm just thinking this isn't very ground breaking. Electricty is more expensive in large cities with apartments complexes that don't have access to a sunlit roof. Instead I would be more interested in a lightbulb that self generates it's own power.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by Scooby Doo
 


Good idea but why not just go back to candles?



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by Scooby Doo
 


Awesome!



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by Phenomium
 


WOW....you are so involved with debunking the "HOAX", you missed the whole concept. Try going back and watching the video again, Einstien.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by whatukno
 


Yes, power saving, and natural sun light directed through water is better for the eyes and healthier for the mindbrain.

...your picture - very good book; still life with woodpecker.
check anastasia and ringing cedars.


LOVE



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:19 PM
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looks interesting I will be reading this later



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:29 PM
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I guess something of this nature might have its uses or even be expanded on somehow, depending on how far such light might travel through a tube.

you might be even able to add food coloring to the water and voila, instant disco lights or psychedelic colors shining through your room to brighten things up.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:32 PM
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reply to post by rjmelter
 


Well, it has crossed my mind while working in the field on the fiber optics telecommunication systems. But, I think the current technology wouldn't work in that application. You would have to have a source of light, a way to distribute it with the capability of branching out to cover several areas, which would require a regeneration type medium at some point. I think the cost would out way the benefits. But, good idea...maybe in time it would be cost efficient and probable.

Cheers!



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:33 PM
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This particular daylighting concept works great if you live in a shed with no second floor, attic, insulation or crawl space to cut through. In fact I may try it in my tool shed. Not practical for typical home construction especially in parts of the country that see freezing temps. Homes just aren't built the way you see it in the video.

For typical construction you can install Solatubes throughout your home on the second floor or all over the house if you live in a one story home. These can even be retrofitted with lightbulb sockets for night time use as well. They look like average recessed lighting fixtures.

www.solatube.com...



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by Ferris.Bueller.II
 


Ha! I was about to post my post =P I thought it was a chemical reaction but it isn't. I was excited at first...



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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Why does the guy in the video get 50 watts of output? If it was purely refracted light, he shouldn't be able to get a 50-watts-reading.

[edit on 4-11-2009 by Nichiren]



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:50 PM
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What a great idea. This might not be the perfect answer for conventionally built homes but when/if you are living without electricity it could make all the difference. These people used what they had & were happy with the results. Not everyone can afford skylights or extra windows. I don't think steel roofs will support skylights without additional framing. It could get expensive. Even the tube style would have to be ordered & shipped in a remote area this could be a pain. The bottles worked great they could be shoved in tight add a bead of caulk & no leak. The bleach keeps them clear.

I have always told my husband it's important to know how to live simply regardless of income. Comfortable living without the basics is possible if you know a few tricks. I'll file this one away just in case.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 12:54 PM
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Works great in houses that have currogated metal roofs and no windows. However, not so useful in houses with roof truss construction and ceiling panels.

reply to post by jibeho
 

Yes, it would work great in sheds. I would love to have some light inside my storage sheds because it was too expensive to add windows to them.

[edit on 11-4-2009 by groingrinder]



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 01:01 PM
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way to think out of the box

a great idea and a great thread

only downside is what to do on cloudy days and nights

its a great step in the right direction though



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by AngelHeart
I'm just thinking this isn't very ground breaking. Electricty is more expensive in large cities with apartments complexes that don't have access to a sunlit roof. Instead I would be more interested in a lightbulb that self generates it's own power.


why dont you go ahead and make one then


of course (like i said in my post on page two) hooking a fiber optic line to it to carry the light to where is needed WOULD work. then you just branch off the lines from the roof to the prism in the room. BAM light in a sky scraper.

awesome you can come up with a self powering lightbuld, but not think about current tech thats cheap and available.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 02:37 PM
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This is great for poor people who drink a lot of pop, have no windows, thin roofs and live in tropical climates!

awesome!

leaves me out though. lol

lol@ folks who think these are "powered".

the bleach is to keep the water clean.
the water is plain old water.
the film container won't degrade in sunlight but the bottle cap will.
If the cap is lost, the water evaporates and there is no diffusion of light.

not powered, works only in war climes and only in houses without windows, during the daylight hours.

there is exactly zero money to be made from this idea, but it will save a lot of people money on electricity, specifically those people mentioned in the opening line of this post.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 02:47 PM
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I believe this method also filters out a lot of the infrared in the sunlight resulting in a cooler lighting source with the heat remaining in the water. It probably isn't a practical alternative here except for maybe in garden sheds as it would be rare for an Oz dwelling to have a bare corrugated iron roof with no ceiling. What we do is simply replace a sheet or two of currugated iron with transparent corrugated plastic which come in clear or a variety of tints and shades which lets the light in without the UV.

Skylights to suit our standard home construction typically cost around $300-$500 and consist of an all-weather domed exterior polycarbonate window (hail-proof), a large flexible reflective tube and an interior translucent perspex window mounted on the plaster ceiling with a fancy trim to make it look classy. The whole tube has to be bug-proof so you don't get any pests living inside it.

[edit on 4/11/2009 by Pilgrum]




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