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Turn a 2-Liter bottle into a 50 watt lightbulb (w/ video)

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posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 05:36 AM
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reply to post by Daisy-Lola
 


For that just use several mirrors and you can reflect the light of the sun wherever you need it. No need to open holes in your roof, and you can cover also your downstair rooms this way.




posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by ElectricUniverse
reply to post by Daisy-Lola
 


For that just use several mirrors and you can reflect the light of the sun wherever you need it. No need to open holes in your roof, and you can cover also your downstair rooms this way.


If they can't afford windows (as there is a complete lack of them), what makes you think they can afford several mirrors instead? The light from the bottles disperses better than a directional mirror

If you watch the video, you'll notice the roof does not leak as someone asks that exact question. I presume he has used some form of a sealant to prevent leaks. If the bottle is wedged in tight, that may also stop it from leaking.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 06:29 AM
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For the people who cant wrap there heads around the use for this idea.....imagine how much power would be saved if people like myself who have rooms that receive little or no sunlight (like my bathroom) didnt have to switch on a light during the day.

I love the idea... if i wasn't renting i would do this especially in my garage.
Thanks OP S+F

[edit on 4/11/2009 by SvenTheBerserK]



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 07:01 AM
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forgive me if i'm wrong but i believe one of the guys in the video said that the lights are on in the morning and shut themselves off at midnight, and the old lady in her bathroom says everything works fine even when it rains, so those things must work for a little while even after sunset no? unless sunsest in brazil is at midnight. that or the translation is not perfect.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 07:02 AM
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I suppose you could use pure alcohol in climates that might have freezing weather. Building code might not allow this here in US. Maybe a nice old fashioned skylight or suntube would work.

[edit on 4-11-2009 by A52FWY]



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 07:13 AM
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This is not a new idea other than using soda bottles. In the past people used glass blocks and prisms for the same effect. Some uses were to bring light down below deck on ships and to light up basements.


glassian.org...



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by Scooby Doo
 


This only works during the day supposably?



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 08:07 AM
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I read this thread and the other thread and I can't believe people talking about hoax, or it only works in the day, and that it's just sunlight. I think that was pretty obvious and was besides the point.

What is so great about it is making do with common things around them. The person did it after they had lost electricity. In order to get light in his shop.

It does more than putting a hole in your roof and letting light shine in because the water hanging down amplifies it. All that light is hitting the water and reflecting all around the room. The result is that rather than light shinning in 1 spot, it fills the room in entire directions.

I doubt people are going to start going out and drilling holes in their roofs and plugging them with 2 liter bottles. But the concept does open up a line of thought on useful ways of making use of existing and free resources.

I wonder how far down will the light travel in the water like that. It would be very cool and save alot of energy if you could put that kind of thing into muliti floor business offices. Not sure how far the light would travel though, it would need to be quite a bit. You would still need regular lights for night time etc, but as most offices work in the day it would save alot of energy.

But even in single floor factories it would save a good bit of energy as well. Obviously they won't be doing 2 liter bottles, but someone could design something on the concept. If rainy and stormy days are a problem and don't give enough light, you can increase the amount of lights, so that there is enough light in the storms, and then use a lens like they have on welding helmets for filters that darken when light hits them to regulate the same amount of light no matter the weather.

Great thinking and good concept IMO.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 08:07 AM
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Solar Powered Lights!

Genius


Hehe, but I do see the benefit of them for sheds and workshops where halogen lights are used and it would be an ideal way to keep brightness in any area you setup if tshtf.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 08:19 AM
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This is just a low cost deck prism. There are new high efficiency glass versions of those available for larger pleasure craft, for example, see www.boatdeckprism.com...



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 08:20 AM
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Originally posted by HotSauce
reply to post by Scooby Doo
 


I watched the vid but I could not see exactly how he made it or what were the parts that made it worked. They said something about water, bleach, and some sort of film cover. Can you explain how they are made? I might give it a try this weekend.


I am sorry that some people have assumed (like myself) that this was some kind of fancy chemistry trick. The bottles are mere skylights. The bleach just keeps the water from getting all green and dirty.

It's still a neat idea. but you are not limited to water bottles, unless you are in a poor are where that's all you have.

-rrr



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 08:33 AM
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A bucket of water does not glow when you put clorox in it to scrub floors......why would it work any different in a bottle. There are so many of these hoaxes on the internet now. Is this what ABOVE "TOP SECRET" has been reduced to??????? METACAFE??????



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 08:36 AM
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great stuff but it's already been covered. Mods?



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 09:13 AM
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reply to post by Phenomium
 


Perhaps you need to reread the posts, or are you just acting retarded? Of course a bucket of water and bleach does not glow. But it does work if you can follow simple directions.

[edit on 11/4/2009 by dirtydog]

[edit on 11/4/2009 by dirtydog]



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 09:49 AM
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so basically what I got is he is chlorinating his water (to kill/prevent growth I presume) and using the bottle of water as a low tech diffuser for a skylight. . You know, not exactly groundbreaking but a definitely fine display of human ingenuity in a pinch. For places that get a lot of light, that actually seems like a pretty good idea on a budget.

yes, there are better and more efficient solutions, but for the money? Can't really beat it.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 10:08 AM
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Very cool, looks like something I'm going to have to try sometime soon. Looks very easy to create/use while still maintaining a decent quality light.



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 10:10 AM
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That is really neat. I bet that would work well as a daytime light source for underground storm shelters too.


[edit on 4-11-2009 by gazerstar]



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 10:19 AM
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There are commercial applications that utilize a similar principal.

www.solatube.com...



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 10:24 AM
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OMG people are soooo dense!

of course it doesnt work at night!

the point is not using the power during the day!

its a great idea for saving money during the day!

at night, you turn your lights on, but guess what, ITS ONLY AT NIGHT OR RAINY DAYS!

only a helpful tip, you could probably rig up a fiberoptic line to it



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 11:14 AM
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So this method is useless at nighttime when light is needed the most, yes?




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