It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Where did all the homeless people go?

page: 3
12
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 12:49 AM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 12:53 AM
link   
Soylent green..... IT'S PEOPLE!!!!



posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 12:54 AM
link   
why not let people just die?



posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 12:56 AM
link   
California
is nice to the homeless
Californ-ya-ya
Super cool to the homeless



posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 01:11 AM
link   
Some houses started empty.

Some families moved in with relatives.

Some families and friends combined, two or three renting a bigger house and sharing it.

Many are struggling to stay in motels and weekly rentals.

Many have gone to shelters.

Many are living in cars.

A lot have gone underground, for it is dangerous to be recognized as homeless.

The number of homeless goes up all the time around here. I'm seeing more and more on the street, frequently newbies with a dazed look on their faces. More seasoned homeless are arriving all the time, because the weather is easier here. I imagine it's the same for all fair-weather states.

I expect that by the new year, it will seem like there's been an explosion of homelessness as peoples' final resources begin to run out. Each job lost now will probably mean putting not 2.5 out on the street, but more like 5 or 6.

We are far closer to a tipping point than most realize: when it comes, people will be shocked at the suddenness and depth, but they shouldn't be...the signs are plain for those willing to read them.



posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 01:21 AM
link   
reply to post by apacheman
 


You are absolutely correct. When those sharing resources to survive get cut off, it's going to put a lot of people on the street. Our problem in America isn't that we have no place for them. There are wealthy people, banks, corporations with land, and buildings sitting vacant. What prevents these more wealthy people from helping is laws and regulations surrounding opening homeless shelters. There is a ton of liability associated with it.

We need a good semaritain law for helping homeless which protects people from liability and eases regulations concerning providing housing to homeless. There are plenty of people willing to help, they just can't afford the liability and management that comes with helping.



posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 09:56 AM
link   
A lot lost the homes they owned for missing a few payments, this would not prevent them from renting another home or mean they don't have enough money to do so now.

Look at the benches throughout your city...have they changed? As for where the homeless went, I have no idea.



posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 12:17 PM
link   
reply to post by Paralaxx
 


Well, I for one lost my home due to a layoff resulting from sagging mortgage industries impacting the local economy. This in turn caused me to default on my home loan after several months looking for a job. I did manage to find another job in another state, moved there, only to be laid off again. So the bank lost their investment but retains the home. I lost everything and while I was able to rent an apartment for awhile...then second layoff really hurt as I had spent any available monies moving and renting. Also, I racked up a couple credit cards in the process hoping I would be able to pay them off. Without a job though you can't do much. I'm sure my bankruptcy will cause a few others to get laid off and the process ripples throughout society at large.



posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 01:09 PM
link   
reply to post by ConspiracyNut23
 


I think you are on to something. We must remember that construction was at record numbers in recent years. In some places there was a five or six year surplus on housing. If a family moves from one house to another the surplus doesn't change. The only thing that changes is which unit is counted as "surplus."



posted on Nov, 8 2009 @ 11:03 PM
link   
I still see the same regulars on the streets. The shelters are overflowing. Many live in motels. I've seen entire, obviously middle class families sleeping in their cars in Wal-Mart parking lots where its allowed. Campers are popular. Squatting in empty homes and vacation homes.
Most seem to be combining households with others.



posted on Nov, 9 2009 @ 08:53 PM
link   
It's hard to house or miss seeing 27mill people, that's about 7 mill more than the whole australian population. That's a LOT of people!!



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 12:47 PM
link   
reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Hi DaddyBare,

I was just watching a show on the history channel about the Nazi era, and I kept finding the story reminding me of changes here in America. Then the show had a couple interviews and the people seem to act just like I am seeing people act today here in a America.....So, at one point of the film, it made me wonder about our homeless people here in America. Wow, I started seeing many accounts on the internet of missing people in droves in many cities. I think we might have some bad stuff happening to the homeless, and I can understand the young people not making a connection, but us older people who know and/or learned the tactics of the socialist movement ought to be pressing this issue and not be silent as those Germans were.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 01:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by Divinorumus
Hey, maybe they all sneaked to Canada for a chance at the good life and to live as illegal hypocrites.


i was thinking the other direction, heading to Mexico for work and along the way they probably got the DOJ and eric holder to have them carry grenades and guns to the drug cartel in exchange for some supplies to start their new lives with.

seriously though they are melting into the landscape in many cases and i just hope when we get this country fixed, we can get them some real help.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 02:58 PM
link   
reply to post by DaddyBare
 


It's an interesting question.

Without researching, and just going from what I've seen on this, I think it's a combination of factors.

1) People grouping up (roommates)
2) Living with relatives
3) Trailers (which are largely unreported in stats)
4) Squatting (with so many unlived in homes, it's a problem)
5) Vehicles (especially vans or RVs)



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 06:06 PM
link   
Here in NYC, I have seen a sharp increase in people asking for change on the streets, highway exits, etc. I haven't seen this since maybe the 70's. I also drove through Harlem the other day, and I saw a huge line in front of a soup kitchen like over a block long.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 06:36 PM
link   
I'm pretty sure the homeless all moved to santa monica california.
not kidding walk aroundthere sometime. beautiful and well managed city but because it's got the best weather in Los Angeles county year round it's a homeless mecca. LAPD picks up homeless and drop them off in santa monica, cause the SMPD are more tolerant and better trained to deal with them.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 06:44 PM
link   
reply to post by DaddyBare
 


most of them are likely living with extended family. If I couldn't afford to live somewhere that's what I would do.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 07:48 PM
link   
I was trying to get an estimate of the number of homeless in the U.S. at this time. I used the following article to start:

www.nationalhomeless.org...

According to the above article, a study was done in 1996 that found on a given night in October, 6.3% of those under the poverty level were homeless. On a given night in February 1996, 10% of those in poverty were homeless. For my calculation below, I will use 8% as an estimate of the percentage of those in poverty who are homeless.

According to the following article “In 2010, 46.9 million people were in poverty, up from 37.3 million in 2007.”

www.worldhunger.org...

Using my estimate of 8% of those in poverty are homeless, the calculation is as follows:

0.08 (percentage of those in poverty are homeless) x 46,900,000 (number in poverty) = 3,752,000 people in the united states are homeless. This equates to slightly over 1 percent of the population.



posted on Jun, 8 2012 @ 07:51 PM
link   
They are missing because they are being turned into cybermen.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 10:34 PM
link   


Even if we cut that number in half.. say half just moved in with friends and family that's still Leaves over 13 million...


You know, learning proper grammar would make your sentences more fun to read. There should be at least something between "family" and "that's". Also, why is the word "Leaves" capitalized?



to be fair lets cut that number in half again... 6.5 millom is still a lot of folks, mostly childrent too


For a thread-starter post, this is really messed up. "MILLOM"? Really? And "CHILDRENT"? Child-rent? What are you trying to say?

Sentences are supposed to begin with a capital letter, commas should be used in their proper places, and so on.

Sorry to make this an english / grammar lesson, but others are probably not going to give it to you, and you really need it. Besides, I am always glad when someone corrects me, because it gives me an opportunity to improve. So, I hope that you can also be glad about this, and learn to improve your english.

At the very least, the thread-starter post should be legible - some random comment I can understand, but the post that starts the whole thread? It's almost unacceptable.

And one more point: bad grammar creates the impression that the writer is not trustworthy or intelligent. Even if you don't consciously think that, it's the gut reaction-type impression it cultivates. At least to those, who can somehow manage this easy task..




top topics



 
12
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join