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African desert rift confirmed as new ocean in the making!

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posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 06:20 PM
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my question to the resident knowledgeable folks: Once the rift gets to mean sea level, or opens into a fresh water reservoir and begins filling up with water: how much will that change the dynamics of the rift increasing and/or pushing the tectonic plates apart?

How does the pressures on the crust change with the additional weight of water on top of accrued sediment?




posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 06:27 PM
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Just found that pic of the rift. From what I have read, it will take about 10 million years for the rift to split the continent.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 06:40 PM
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Originally posted by sensfan


Just found that pic of the rift. From what I have read, it will take about 10 million years for the rift to split the continent.
Well I guess trying to beat the rush on some prime ocean front property would be a waste of time huh?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 06:53 PM
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PHEW!! Solenki, You're a legend.
Having nearly finished my Geology degree, reading this thread was really beginning to hurt my brain. I realise this is a conspiracy site and members here are more likely to accept alternative theories than everyday folk. But what is up with all this "Expanding Earth" chat?

Denying ignorance doesn't mean accepting any theory that goes against the "official story/theory".
Ignorance: "Ignorance is the state in which one lacks knowledge, is unaware of something or chooses to subjectively ignore information. This should not be confused with being unintelligent, as one's level of intelligence and level of education or general awareness are not the same."

Plate tectonics and continental drift aren't just theories cooked up by "TPTB". They are theories that have been constructed piece by piece from observations and scientific data that have been collected over the last few generations from all around the globe.

Sorry to sound like a knob :p Now i know what other members must feel like when they read a thread that includes areas of knowledge they specialise in. I'm sure if i made a post in a chemistry thread i'd make dozens of members think


ON TOPIC: Pretty sure this will have almost zero effect on us as people, as the process will take so long we (an individual) won't notice any changes in our lifetime. Humans will merely accept however it is in their lifetime as 'just how it is and is ment to be', and only by reading history books or looking at old maps would an individual know it was ever any different.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 07:10 PM
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This is a great thread, particularly in comparison to some of the stuff that's been getting heavily flagged lately. An interesting but unusual subject, grounded in reality, with sound evidence... and people are even responding positively to input from experts!

I'm excited to see a geological event of this significance occur during my lifetime. I'd love to hear more from the experts on the details of this event...

I assume the process could take tens or hundreds of thousands of years, but how frequently can major events like the one that created this rift occur? Will we see more progress in the formation of this new sea during our lifetimes?

The implications for agriculture in Africa, and the potential effects on the Nile, are interesting as well. Will the inundation of salt water prove harmful, or will it provide sufficient moisture to the dry interior of the continent that local ecosystems (over a long time period, of course) could shift from desert to more temperate climes?

I'm interested... off to Wikipedia, I guess.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 07:44 PM
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I dig it ! Thanks!



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 08:06 PM
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wouldn't it still just be the Indian ocean ?

Except that now the Indian Ocean is bigger?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 08:13 PM
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WOW, those pictures really put into perspective how large that is. I am sorry if I missed it but what news source is it from? Thanks, Pinky



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 08:18 PM
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Originally posted by arizonascott
reply to post by kiwifoot
 


This is a little off topic. I am relating this story to my question simply because of recent extreme Earth changes and items like this subject here that you have presented. Subjects that are not discussed much.

Has anyone done a study on plate movement and earthquakes in relation to ground saturation. If rain constantly weighs down over time on a particular plate and in the same area, does that water saturation have an effect on the movement or slide of the plate.

In the same sense, couldn't the Earth also shift water or create a land rift in an arid area that needs balance and more saturation?

A bigger picture is forming that the World that we live on "is" actually alive and its own entity.

Any real answers would be awesome. This is something I have been curious about for some time now.


Hey Scott
There is a book I am sure you can find on Amazon or in your library. It is called Ice Age Lost . By Gwen Schultz. I think she did it for her Doctors degree. It is dated but Truly fantastic for a gradual understanding of the earth as a living thing. Tectonics are then more easily addressed.
Yeah, the earth is a living breathing beast of it's own.
Viva our planet.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 08:22 PM
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Originally posted by LucidDreamer85
wouldn't it still just be the Indian ocean ?

Except that now the Indian Ocean is bigger?



I could be wrong, but the new area would probably be a sea, like the African Sea.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 08:22 PM
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Originally posted by LucidDreamer85
wouldn't it still just be the Indian ocean ?

Except that now the Indian Ocean is bigger?


Come on party pooper .
It would be the Afro/Indian Sea.

[edit on 2-11-2009 by Donny 4 million]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 09:26 PM
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Originally posted by kiwifoot

Originally posted by thecrow001
i know i hate it when things like this happen, if this does turn out to be a ocean i say lets put some pots and treasures for people of the future to discover


even though i know its a stupid idea


I like it, we could start our own 'Atlantis' myth!

Who knows, it may split open to reveal more than we bargained for!


i will lead the expidition to do this greatest prank in history. You can start by sending your precious metals and contact info to the address in my profile.

As far as sea levels, a shift shouldn't cause much of a change once things settle down. However if one of these ieces sinks it could mean some higher water levels.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 09:51 PM
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Originally posted by sensfan


Just found that pic of the rift. From what I have read, it will take about 10 million years for the rift to split the continent.


Cool photo. Great fossils in there.
Did they say how long before it fills with water?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 10:00 PM
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EARTH'S NUCLEAR REACTIONS WITHIN ITS EXPANDING CORE

There is definitive proof that Earth and other planetary bodies have expanded. The evidence stands on its own and I urge everyone to look for themselves:




Note: I do not support the hollow Earth B.S.

However, nuclear reactions must be occurring which can be the only explanation for an expanding core mass. It should also interest many here that LENR CANR science experiments around the world have been successful and proven that nuclear reactions can take place in solid and liquid metals without requiring millions of degrees in heat. (Google LENR and CANR for more information if you want details. )

There are two competing models behind the cold fusion phenomenon;

1.) metals have the ability to absorb and compact gas(Hydrogen, Deuterium) atoms enough to fuse. Their rate of absorption and ejection are dependent on factors such as temperature and energy applied.

2.) Hydrino theory: en.wikipedia.org...

An expanding core means nuclear reactions are taking place in liquid metal and it should be possible to replicate if one can duplicate the conditions. Guess what? It has partially been replicated with molten salt mixture.

Liaw, B. Y.(Fourth International Conference on
Cold Fusion and Fusion Technol. 23 (1993) 92)
obtained significant extra heat using a molten salt mixture of LiD+KCl
+LiCl at 450° C.

[edit on 2-11-2009 by platoslab]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 10:52 PM
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Originally posted by Solenki
reply to post by kiwifoot
 

Since i've been reading ATS I've always read some crazy things about geology, and being a geologist is almost heartbreaking.

1. Stop with the expending earth... with enough time i'll demonstrate you why it's impossible, and proof of the earth being a whole solid body but well, it's already late here (i'm in france), so maybe next time.

Finally, for those still giving the old propaganda of the hollow earth and the earth in expansion, please, read some more about plate tectonics, subduction, collision and wilson cycle. I just can stand those people, they are creationist for me. No offence, it's juste that all the creastionist I've encountered were narrow minded about scientific fact.

I hope my explaination was clear, sorry I do what I can in english and I'm in a kind of hurry to go sleeping at last.

Don't hestitate if you have questions, I may not be the best geologist, but I can surely help understand.

bye ATS I love reading you before sleeping !


How can you possibly explain subduction when all the continents fit together to form a smaller sphere? I must invoke Occam's razor on this and go with the expanding Earth model. (FYI: I am an atheist)

It is also my personal belief that nuclear reactions are responsible for the newly generated mass originating from the core. A belief further supported by various LENR and CANR science experiments.

In addition, a smaller Earth will result in lower gravity which can explain how dinosaurs were able to achieve their large growth.

It all fits together (pardon the pun).

[edit on 2-11-2009 by platoslab]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by Anamnesis
I've seen the video related to the Expanding Earth theories and there are some interesting points made. However, there are some things about it which leaves me scratching my head. One is the claim that there are no subduction zones to be found on the planet. Yet there are plenty of examples of subduction zones to be found all over the globe.

Don't get me wrong though, I'm fairly open minded about these new theories. Expanding Earth would be possible if Torison field and Spherical waveform physics theories are factored in as well. But, one has to remember that a theory is based in speculation (hypothesis) and you should be able to make predictions based on any theory. One prediction you could make about an expanding planet theory is that planetary expansion should be observable on other planets in the Solar System but no such observation has been made.

Though I haven't ruled out any possibilties just yet...



Observations supporting expansion on other bodies are available.

Videos by Neal Adams:

www.nealadams.com...



posted on Nov, 3 2009 @ 12:20 AM
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Originally posted by The Parallelogram
I assume the process could take tens or hundreds of thousands of years, but how frequently can major events like the one that created this rift occur?


Constantly. The continents are constantly moving. Right now, the Himalays are still traveling upwards and America and Asia are getting closer while America drifts away from Europe.


Will we see more progress in the formation of this new sea during our lifetimes?


Yes, measured in feet. Nothing larger.


The implications for agriculture in Africa, and the potential effects on the Nile, are interesting as well.


It won't have a significant impact for thosands of years.


Will the inundation of salt water prove harmful, or will it provide sufficient moisture to the dry interior of the continent that local ecosystems (over a long time period, of course) could shift from desert to more temperate climes?


The winds there blow from the east. Moisture in the west won't do much.



posted on Nov, 3 2009 @ 12:23 AM
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This is really cool news!!

Pretty exciting...although...not sure if we (our generation) would be the ones to finally see the waters.



posted on Nov, 3 2009 @ 12:37 AM
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Originally posted by Dr.Venkman
Having nearly finished my Geology degree, reading this thread was really beginning to hurt my brain. I realise this is a conspiracy site and members here are more likely to accept alternative theories than everyday folk. But what is up with all this "Expanding Earth" chat?


Started by artist Neil Adams, who is an excellent artist but who napped through all his science classes and never stood and studied a rock formation as it lay on the landscape. It would be "gneiss" if he wasn't so obliviously determined that he'd discovered something famous and unknown.


Plate tectonics and continental drift aren't just theories cooked up by "TPTB". They are theories that have been constructed piece by piece from observations and scientific data that have been collected over the last few generations from all around the globe.


And you can actually see them, but you have to learn what to look for and understand what you're seeing. This valley's been around for a very long time, but the motion was only noticed recently.


ON TOPIC: Pretty sure this will have almost zero effect on us as people, as the process will take so long we (an individual) won't notice any changes in our lifetime. Humans will merely accept however it is in their lifetime as 'just how it is and is ment to be', and only by reading history books or looking at old maps would an individual know it was ever any different.


Exactly.



posted on Nov, 3 2009 @ 01:52 AM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Thanks for addressing that, Byrd. I'm aware that the development of the rift will be extremely gradual; geology isn't generally a blink-and-you'll-miss-it sort of deal. That's why I was so struck by the sudden formation of this rift; events that dramatic are rare, as I understand it.

Sucks about the moisture thing. I didn't know that about the local wind patterns; I guess I'm always hoping to see something change in Africa to alleviate some of the environmental stresses in the region, even if the fruition of that change will take thousands of years. Humanity will need arable land desperately by that point, not that we don't already, particularly on that famine-prone continent.

still an interesting story, though.



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