African desert rift confirmed as new ocean in the making!

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posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 01:57 PM
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Now I post quite a few Science related stories on ATS, I find them interesting but others don't seem to!

This one comes under that category!

African desert rift confirmed as new ocean in the making


In 2005, a gigantic, 35-mile-long rift broke open the desert ground in Ethiopia. At the time, some geologists believed the rift was the beginning of a new ocean as two parts of the African continent pulled apart, but the claim was controversial.


A new Ocean forming in the centre of Africa, now I really do find that coool!


Now, scientists from several countries have confirmed that the volcanic processes at work beneath the Ethiopian rift are nearly identical to those at the bottom of the world's oceans, and the rift is indeed likely the beginning of a new sea.

The new study, published in the latest issue of Geophysical Research Letters, suggests that the highly active volcanic boundaries along the edges of tectonic ocean plates may suddenly break apart in large sections, instead of little by little as has been predominantly believed. In addition, such sudden large-scale events on land pose a much more serious hazard to populations living near the rift than would several smaller events, says Cindy Ebinger, professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester and co-author of the study.




It doesn't say how the rift will form into an ocean, or where the water will come from, but it's still amazing.

It's not often in the history of Earth that people can say they witnessed the birth of a new Ocean!

From the British Geological Survey


A BGS team are mapping the geology of the Afar desert in northern Ethiopia — reputed to be the hottest place on Earth.

Afar is part of the volcanically and seismically active portion of the African Rift and is one of the few places on Earth where we can witness plate divergence as the continental crust splits apart to form a new ocean.

The Afar Rift project aims to track the creation of magma (molten rock) from deep within the Earth, studying how it migrates and evolves as it rises towards the surface. We will study how the surface of the Earth reacts as it is thinned and split apart and how the magma is intruded into this thin crust to form the beginnings of a new ocean.
Afar Rift Consortium


So it looks like the Rift will widen, eventually splitting the continent, becoming an ocean.


(Thanks to fleetlord for bringing this image to my attention!)

But I'm pretty sure it's a few million years away yet, but I still find it interesting!

I'll be the only one as usual!





[edit on 2-11-2009 by kiwifoot]




posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:01 PM
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I am a big Geology fan and I find that very interesting. I am anxious to see if it will reveal any ancient cities or technology that has been hidden from us.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by groingrinder
I am a big Geology fan and I find that very interesting. I am anxious to see if it will reveal any ancient cities or technology that has been hidden from us.


Yeah good point, imagine the fossils that could be exposed, if the lava doesn't destroy them, that is!

If that continent could talk, it would have some stories!

All the best, Kiwifoot



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:11 PM
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I've heard that the African continent is splitting into two tectonic plates (the Nubian Plate and Somalian Plate). Africa is supposed to split open right down to Lake Victoria and then out to sea.
Click here - for a more visual form.
The Afar region the source mentions is shaded in red.

It will probably remain a dry valley (not counting rainfall) until the split reaches the Red Sea. I wish I could be there when that happens, imagine an entire sea filling up a valley...


This might be a great opportunity to get a look at what a dry ocean looks like. Maybe we can use it when looking at other water-less planets?




[edit on 2-11-2009 by fleetlord]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:17 PM
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i love these threads i should tell people more.

amazing at what we could be seeing here. Bring on the new knowleadge which will appear.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by fleetlord
 


Thanks mate, I added that to the thread, I gave you credit of course!


And you're right on both accounts- I'd love to be there and it may turn up a heap of info!

thanks again!

[edit on 2-11-2009 by kiwifoot]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001
i love these threads i should tell people more.

amazing at what we could be seeing here. Bring on the new knowleadge which will appear.


Always the pessimist (me), I just hope it doesn't crack open a seam of gold or diamonds, and some Western Corporation comes in and devours the lot!

I could see that happening!



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:30 PM
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If a new ocean forms.. does that means that ocean levels will lower?

A rift the size of the width of africa is alot of water even it if is skinny.
what happens then?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:32 PM
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i know i hate it when things like this happen, if this does turn out to be a ocean i say lets put some pots and treasures for people of the future to discover


even though i know its a stupid idea



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:34 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001
i know i hate it when things like this happen, if this does turn out to be a ocean i say lets put some pots and treasures for people of the future to discover


even though i know its a stupid idea


I like it, we could start our own 'Atlantis' myth!

Who knows, it may split open to reveal more than we bargained for!



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by grey580
If a new ocean forms.. does that means that ocean levels will lower?

A rift the size of the width of africa is alot of water even it if is skinny.
what happens then?


I'll have to ask the same question. Would the ocean levels lower??



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:37 PM
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Originally posted by grey580
If a new ocean forms.. does that means that ocean levels will lower?

A rift the size of the width of africa is alot of water even it if is skinny.
what happens then?


Hm, good question, I'd assume that the water coming in to fill the rift will reduce the sea levels a touch, but it will probably be so hot when it happens, in a few million years, that it may not make a dent.

Hm I wonder if there are any more learned members who have thoughts on that one?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:41 PM
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i dont think it will lower the sea levels with global warming coming just in time


could more oceans be popping up in other places ?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:43 PM
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Just putting it out there, could a level 10 earthquake, speed up the process on it turning into a new ocean? Not saying it will happen.

[edit on 2-11-2009 by Maddogkull]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by Maddogkull
Just putting it out there, could a level 10 earthquake, speed up the process on it turning into a new ocean? Not saying it will happen, just putting it out there.


From what I can gather, the process happens in large events, like major earthquakes, so that scenario is possible.

Wouldn't want to be anywhere near there when that goes down!



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:50 PM
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Man i love this stuff!!!!
Thanks so much for bringing this to us, your definatly not alone in loving the science aspects of the unusual.
First thing i thought of when i saw the article is that theory that the earth is not comprised of tectonique plates but its expanding. I dont know why exactly but thats what came to mind.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001
i dont think it will lower the sea levels with global warming coming just in time


could more oceans be popping up in other places ?


From what I can gather from good ol' Wiki, divergence of techtonic plates is happening all over the world, except it's usually under the sea.



* The Mid-Atlantic Ridge
* Red Sea Rift
* East African Rift
* West Antarctic Rift
* East Pacific Rise
* Pacific-Antarctic Ridge
* Galapagos Rise
* Gakkel Ridge
* Explorer Ridge


that's why this is so unique!



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:53 PM
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reply to post by kiwifoot
 



or where the water will come from

I would think that if this rift opens up toward another body of water, that is where the water would come from. For example, if one end of this rift opened up at the Indian Ocean, water would flood into the rift from the Indian Ocean. As for the water levels, I think it would depend how big this sea ended up being and how deep it was. If it ends up being the size of the Mediterranean, I think that there may be something to worry about. I don't see something Lake Superior size doing much.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:56 PM
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Don't sell yourself short, this is a really cool find. I never heard of this prior to this thread, it's interesting on many levels. I'd love to see what this would look like when it fills in! Thanks for posting this info



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:56 PM
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I wonder how quickly it happened?





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