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Green Fire Ball flies across the Calgary morning sky (3/29/09)

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posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 12:03 AM
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Im not sure how to post the video to this page, so heres a link to a radio broadcast/interviews.
www.youtube.com...

Im not an expert on meteors or fireballs, so im not sure if whats being described is one of those or something different.


Although likely unrelated heres the video of the "meteor" that occured in 2008 mentioned in the radio broadcast.

www.youtube.com...






[edit on 2-11-2009 by FoxMulder91]




posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 12:58 AM
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check here.....


www.thelivingmoon.com...




posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 01:13 AM
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Its going up ?

Isnt that strange ?

IS someone leaving for some reason ?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 06:57 AM
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reply to post by FoxMulder91
 


I have not had a chance to check the youtube video but there is nothing unusual about "green meteors" or fireballs. It has been talked about on here many times in the past, and a little searching would turn up those discussions:

bright green fallign thing
Green meteor/fireball sighting?
Green Meteorite (??) spotted North of Toronto
green shooting stars
weird green ball with tail
Seen a swift/very swift moving light (colored or white) in the sky?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 07:09 AM
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reply to post by FoxMulder91
 


if its green, its probably a bolide/meteorite...except if its walking around and trying to abduct you



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 07:16 AM
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Colours can vary, depending on what the Meteor is made of and what is burning off, they can have many different metals in them that changes the colour as they burn up, kind of like fireworks they use different powdered metals in some to change their colours.

In fact I think green is the common colour for Meteors, at least for me anyhow.



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by FoxMulder91
 


Sorry It took me a while to get back here.


Im not an expert on meteors or fireballs, so im not sure if whats being described is one of those or something different.


I listened, and what I heard is consistent with a bright meteor.


Its going up ?

Isnt that strange ?

IS someone leaving for some reason ?


It's not strange at all, since the direction a meteor will appear to travel depends on where on Earth you observe it from. Remember, although they can seem to be low, meteors are only luminous above 40 km altitude (perhaps 20-25 km in rare cases). Since they are so high up, they can be seen for many hundreds of miles, and since Earth is curved, someone just over the horizon can see it going in one direction, while you see it going in the other.

This diagram shows what's going on. It's slightly exaggerated in order to prove my point.



A and B are observing the same meteor entering our atmosphere, separated by hundreds of miles. The red lines represent their respective lines of sight, and the colors in the meteor represent the altitude, green being high, and red being low, just as it is in real life with cometary meteor showers like the Leonids and Perseids.

To observer A, the meteor appears to fly up from the horizon, whilst the same meteor seen by observer B would appear to fall towards the ground.


Here you can find footage from other locations of the same event (scroll down), at least I think it was, but in any case it demonstrates how different a meteor can appear due to perspective, as well as how misleading the apparent direction can be.


Colours can vary, depending on what the Meteor is made of and what is burning off, they can have many different metals in them that changes the colour as they burn up, kind of like fireworks they use different powdered metals in some to change their colours.

In fact I think green is the common colour for Meteors, at least for me anyhow.


Actually meteors do not "burn", and the green color seen in most green meteors is usually due to oxygen, although in the slower meteors (like the one in question here) it may be due to elements ablated from the meteor.

Color in meteors is actually very subjective, and everyone perceives the colors in meteors a little differently, hence why reports of the same event can vary a bit. Our eyes are most sensitive to green light, so it makes sense that meteors often appear to be green, out of all the wavelengths present in meteor spectra.




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