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Liquid (water?) flows on Mars Now!!

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posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by Imagir
 


Why unnatural? It doesn't look different from the other natural-looking things around it?

What do you consider unnatural in it?




posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 06:19 PM
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I am wondering if the dusts storms which would "heat up" the atmosphere,(a relative term i'm sure) temporarily give the water the chance to flow even briefly. The idea of salty water is also an aid, and some theorists are sticking their necks out now with the idea that Mars may still be molton in some area near the core even though it has no magnetic field. Their idea comes from the fact that Mars is stretchy like Earth, but on a much smaller scale, but nevertheless stretchy. It's easier in fact to assume that any or most of the water on Mars would be salty if you go by the Earth model, but in the case of Mars, maybe the process stopped at a time when most of the salt had been subsumed below the sea bottoms. So, if there are still some heat processes available from dust storms, and also from internal heating and direct sunlight you can imagine how Mars can still have a little pee now and then.



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 06:54 PM
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if you wana be in the know why not go work for the government and find out first hand.



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 07:09 PM
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Wow!

Great finds, S&F


These pics are really good! They look to be recent flows, very distinct color differences in the areas and a natural flow pattern.

This is surely inconclusive evidence that water is flowing just beneath the surface of Mars and occasionally makes it's way to the surface?

The only thing I would have to say is they may be older than we hope they are, Mars is not geologically active considering it's core has solidified; which brings to mind the question of if there is little to no geological activity, what is making the water rise to the surface only on occasion? You would think either it would be permanently underground or permanently visibly flowing on the surface.

All in all, excellent find!

NEXUS



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by smurfy
 


It's not only the cold that prevents liquid water from existing on the surface of Mars, it's also the very low atmospheric pressure.

Any liquid water that may somehow itself on the surface of Mars would very quickly turn into a gas. Even if Mars was warm enough for liquid water, there is not enough air pressure to keep water in its liquid state.

Like I described in an earlier post, water on Earth would do the same thing in a vacuum. Even at normal room temperature, water would seem to "boil away" in a vacuum.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:11 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by Imagir
 


Why unnatural? It doesn't look different from the other natural-looking things around it?

What do you consider unnatural in it?


I consider absolutely anomalous a "circular" rock with a "hole into the center" and rested on some “legs”...



Like this one...






posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 06:49 AM
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Here's a couple of links to photos taken by ESA:

www.reinhardkargl.com...

www.ias.u-psud.fr...

Sorry they are not the original links but I just a did quick Google for the images.

The second image is most telling, clearly liquid is present in the gully as indicated by the colour change!

regards,

Malcolm



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 
Hi Soylent,
I agree that against both pressure and the cold liquid water would be defeated. But if there was an area with high enough pressure,(there are some very deep basins) and the water if salty would have a higher boiling point, so then perhaps you could have the escaping water from Aquiferous rocks existing for a time, possibly until the sun goes down. There is some moisture in the Martian atmosphere but so little the escaped water would eventually evaporate into the atmosphere.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by smurfy
 

I agree that there may be conditions on Mars under which liquid water may exist for more than a fleeting instant.

Like I said in one of my earlier posts, I believe NASA scientists thought that water mixed with soil (in muddy flows) could flow for a while prior to evaporating. I believe this happens because the "local" pressure inside the mud caused by the soil in that mud can help keep the water liquid, at least for a short time.

Chemistry is not my strong suit, so I don't know if salt would help water resist evaporation in ultra-low atmospheric pressures (although it would help resist freezing). Is there a chemistry reason that the salt would help resist evaporation? Perhaps it would have the same effect as the soil in the mud.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by Imagir
I consider absolutely anomalous a "circular" rock with a "hole into the center" and rested on some “legs”...

I cannot see anything resting on some "legs", just something that looks like the other rock outcroppings around that area with some brighter and darker areas in itself.

And zooming-in to such an extent is useless, you are seeing more of the zooming algorithm than of the photo. If you want to see the photos as they are ignore Google Earth (I only use it to locate the photos) and go to the real source, the HiRISE site, in this case.



Like this one...

Well, I couldn't guess that you were thinking about a different photo, could I?

Sure, that's a strange looking rock. At least in the Google Earth version.

Edit: here is the University of Arizona version.
(click for full size)


[edit on 2/11/2009 by ArMaP]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Again excellent work.

But also in this HiRISE image, The "ANOMALY" is still there.

What is that circular Rock?





[edit on 2-11-2009 by Imagir]

[edit on 2-11-2009 by Imagir]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by Imagir
 


I know it's there, or did you thought that it was visible just by luck, on a 4047x69999 pixels image?


As I said, that's a strange rock, and there are more strange rocks in that place.
(click for full size)


But I was saying that I don't see that rock near the liquid flow as unnatural looking, and I thought that was the one you were talking about, right?



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Right ArMaP.


Only an "mine anomalous" digression about these Strange martian rocks!



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 04:17 PM
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I'm late on this post, but I want to remind anyone still looking in on it that there is ample evidence now that there are active bases on Mars, and have been off and on for thousands of years, if not longer. So goodness knows what we would really see on Mars if we were allowed to really look. Though the surface is not very hospitable (per some stories it once was) and all current bases are said to be underground, there is no reason why you would not find traces of water, plants, etc., etc. on that planet.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by l_e_cox
 


Ice on surface, methane in atmosphere, and now water....?
Maybe there was and there is, right now, Alien life on Mars?

I begin to think so....



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 
Sorry Soylent,
I was away at a meeting for a while. I would think that Salt water would take a lot longer to evaporate, and if it was muddy Salt water it would take longer again, a sort of Tug o' War between the dry Atmosphere and the solution. I suppose you could say, how long does it take to dry out a brick?

Edit to add this link,
news.nationalgeographic.com...

I found this link and I am surprised that it seems to have had little attention, instead of the ice that the Phoenix lander found. In the story you will see that they think that the water was actually leached out of the Atmosphere, at least in this case.

[edit on 2-11-2009 by smurfy]



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by ALLis0NE
 


"I used the model to look for regions that meet the minimum requirements for liquid water -- above the triple point and below the boiling point," explained Haberle. "According to the model, the highest surface pressure, 12.4 millibars, occurs at the bottom of the Hellas Basin (a low-lying area created by an ancient asteroid strike). The problem is that the boiling temperature there is only +10 °C. It can't get very hot or the water will boil away."

What about BEER???? a tall one at +5 C sounds good to me!!!!!



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 01:10 PM
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Im not sure its water but some form of liquid yes.

[edit on 11/4/09 by Ophiuchus 13]



posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 11:25 AM
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I think that this can eliminate every doubt...

An enormous liquid tap flow of 4 Km. to the slopes of Olympus Mons!






posted on Nov, 7 2009 @ 11:38 AM
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Absolutely IMPRESSIVE!







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