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Magical Number Nine

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posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 09:23 AM
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reply to post by Im a Marty
 



Originally posted by Im a Marty
In numerology the Number 9 represents 'child like' characterstics... (when doing name analysis as well as date of birth analysis)

Also the number 144 = All possibilities. 1+4+4 = 9.

144 is represented as a master number, and i believe is part of the Fibonacci sequence.

There are 9 levels of angelic frequencies, all 9 together make the 10th, or 1 +0, or 1, ie 'god'. (not angels like in christianity, but frequencies)

Heaps more on number 9, its a very important number...


Hey Im a Marty,

I cannot help but comment even tho number 10 isn't really the topic here.. 1 and 0 are both individual numbers, meaning that they cannot be divided. Well, of course 1 can be divided if we allow decimals but let's not do that now, because it would expand the topic too much.

Also, legendary Pythagoras and his school considered number ten being holy number (I guess along with other numbers like 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9). But for mere symbological value, since 1 is masculine and 0 is femine - 1 is rod, eh, the male reproducing organ and 0 represents women's corresponding organs. But also because the 1, 2, 3 and 4 together make ten. It is said to be a number of (hu)man also.

-v




posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 09:27 AM
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Originally posted by gazerstar

The Number Nine



Hey gazerstar,

It seems really that these can be found from wikipedia as well. Thanks for posting that link, I will be reading it. Indeed 9 has been considered to be "holy" number in many cultures, religions and beliefs. No wonder if it has such amazing applications. It almost seems like it derives somehow from the nature itself.

-v



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by v01i0
 


Thank you!
I hadn't noticed that.
And I hadn't noticed your reply until just now, so forgive my tardy response.

(I still think there should be a new thread - perhaps titled "The Mathematical Fingerprint of God", which would attract much more attention.

It's not as if redundant threads were unheard of here...)



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by Vanitas
 



Originally posted by Vanitas
reply to post by v01i0
 


Thank you!
I hadn't noticed that.
And I hadn't noticed your reply until just now, so forgive my tardy response.


Hey no problem, can happen to anyone!


Originally posted by Vanitas
(I still think there should be a new thread - perhaps titled "The Mathematical Fingerprint of God", which would attract much more attention.

It's not as if redundant threads were unheard of here...)


Yeah, it deserves an in-depth thread. I won't start it as I don't know about the matter that much and I'd like to see if valhala wants to take the initiative now that he can post threads.

I am certainly looking forward to it.

-v



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 10:46 AM
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Originally posted by v01i0

Yeah, it deserves an in-depth thread. I won't start it as I don't know about the matter that much and I'd like to see if valhala wants to take the initiative now that he can post threads.

-v


Good idea: let's nudge Valhalla together!


Thanks!



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 12:23 PM
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Originally posted by johnb
You are all kidding aren't you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

In the UK we are taught this aged around 8 it's basic arithmetic or at least I was and so have my 2 boys 8 and 11.

I don't mean to flame anyone but if this is an indication of current education levels I'm appalled.

But numbers are amazing and you can have loads of 'fun' with them.

Try sequences, Fibonnaci etc

[edit on 31-10-2009 by johnb]


My sentiments exactly.

I always found my 9s tables among the easiest because you could always check the accuracy of your calculation by adding up the digits to make 9. I was in my second year of primary school at the time. I was 5 but everyone else was 6, an advantage I spent the rest of my youthful years squandering. Again, without wishing to offend anyone, I am stunned and awestruck that there are people out there who were never taught this and/or never noticed it by themselves. People need to turn off their tellys and read and think more.

I too love the Fibonnaci Sequence, although its shine has faded somewhat since it became common in TV drama, sci-fi and novels.

Anyone into numbers who hasn't seen the movie 'Pi' get yee over to Amazon immediately. It is one of, if not THE greatest low budget first time director films ever made. A sci-fi of the mind as opposed to one of special effects.

Edit to add: There is some really interesting stuff around the number 23, I've been researching it ever since the late nineties after reading 'Illuminatus'. Ignore the Jim Carey movie though it was pants, for a man that had admittedly been researching 23 for ten years prior to the movie he really should have known better.

[edit on 1-11-2009 by sharps]



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by valhala
 


Thanks for the heads up on Rodin I'm off to delve into his mind right now.

The first thing a search brought up for me was the hundredth monkey syndrome. Is that really one of his? It's funny how you can be familiar with a theorem, test, experiment etc but have no idea who was behind It. Scientists and mathematicians really are this generation's unsung heroes.



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by sharps
 



Originally posted by sharps
Again, without wishing to offend anyone, I am stunned and awestruck that there are people out there who were never taught this and/or never noticed it by themselves. People need to turn off their tellys and read and think more.


No offense taken. Not everybody are so interested in numbers. I never was, until recently. I guess it took me few decades to come knowing this thing by a random nightly pondering.



Originally posted by sharps
Edit to add: There is some really interesting stuff around the number 23, I've been researching it ever since the late nineties after reading 'Illuminatus'.


I'm interested. On a side note, my birthday is on 23.9. Care to explain more about 23?


Originally posted by sharps
It's funny how you can be familiar with a theorem, test, experiment etc but have no idea who was behind It.


Umm, in my opinion there is always the chance that one comes up alone with one's own thinking (exactly the thing that happened to me with this thread), then later notice that it was nothing new. I guess it has something to with universal truths that are not property of anyone, but rather existing laws or models in nature and hence they are found over and over again. Just my opinion tho.

Sincerely,

-v

[edit on 1-11-2009 by v01i0]



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 02:19 PM
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Originally posted by v01i0
reply to post by Xtraeme
 


The functions in your post really are big pieces for me to swallow, so to speak


But I somewhat understand the concept of radix, yet hexadecimal is completely strange for me.


Understanding number-bases and converting from Hex to decimal really isn't that bad, just remember that when I say x*[Number-Base]^0 that I'm indicating the right-most position of a value. For instance if we have the number 123.

Then 3 is at the 3*[Number-Base]^0 position.
2 is in the 2*[Number-Base]^1 position.
And, 1 is in the 1 * [Number-Base]^2 position.

Put another way 123, in base 10, is equal to (1*10^2) + (2*10^1) + (3*10^0).

Likewise 123, in hexadecimal or base-16, is equal to (1*16^2) + (2*16^1) + (3*16^0) which equals 291 in base-10. Or if we wanted to stay in base-16 we could have said 123 in hexadecimal is equal to (1*10H^2) + (2*10H^1) + (3*10H^0), where H means hexadecimal.

So you can say 123H (again the H meaning Hexadecimal) does not equal 123 (base-10).

Once you've got that understood then it should be pretty trivial to understand why 9, in base 10, when multiplied by any other number always results in a value that, when broken up in to its constituent numbers, will always equal 9.

I think the easiest way to understand this is to go through the steps: 9 * 2 = 18.

Now what just happened there?

Think of the first number 9 as actually: 09. So the 0 increased by +1. The 9 decreased by -1.

Why did this happen?

Because 9 is 1 less than 10. So when you double it you're going to have one less in the x*10^0 position. Why? Because for the number in the x*10^0 position to stay the same the number must be an even multiple of 10. For the number in the x*10^0 position to increase it must be 1 greater than 10.

Since we're always multiplying by 9 we're always decreasing the position in the x*10^0 position by -1. However since 9 is 1 less than the number base (10) any number multiplied by 9 will necessarily cause an increase in the x*10^1 position. So any multiplication by 9 in base 10 is just distributing the value from the right-hand side (x*[Number-Base]^0) to the left-hand side (x*[Number-Base]^1).

IE/

09 * 1 = 09
09 * 2 = 18



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by Xtraeme
 


Thanks again for your carefully formulated post.

I will give it careful consideration once I have slept over night. I am such newbie with maths that I sometimes - well usually - have hard time even to understanding the syntax. For example, for what the symbol ^ stands for? Exponent?

Truly you have captivated me like a teacher, and I am pupil willing to learn - altho there is a little 'language' barrier as I am humanist in to the core, poor in maths and not even native to the English language.

But I try to my best to comprehend. This was quite clear:

Originally posted by Xtraeme
Think of the first number 9 as actually: 09. So the 0 increased by +1. The 9 decreased by -1.


But after that the meaning of syntax again escapes me, mainly because of ^!

Thanks for being patient. And for in-depth post


-v



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by v01i0
reply to post by Xtraeme
 

For example, for what the symbol ^ stands for? Exponent?


Yep! You got it. ^ is always exponentiation. IE/ 3^2 = 9 and 8^2 = 64.


altho there is a little 'language' barrier as I am humanist in to the core, poor in maths and not even native to the English language.


A lot of times people obsess over the "why?" rather than the "how." The longer you simply do the "how" the easier it becomes to understand "why." Trig for instance was a huge hurdle for me back in high school because I had to accept that this "Sine" and "Cosine" function were black-boxes that I couldn't compute by hand. I could use them, but I didn't understand the minutiae which bothered the hell out of me and my teachers had no idea how to calculate these things manually themselves.

Later I came to realize what they really represented were just lengths of square roots and then it was no longer a frustration, but I had to learn how to use it before I could learn why it worked the way it did.

Anyways happy to help, hopefully the explanations make it a little bit clearer why 9 behaves the way it does in multiplication.

For the record I do believe certain numbers are more than just an abstract sequence. That they represent something much broader, but that gets more in to identities and how they allow for cancellation of not just a number but an entire operation (IE/ 3 * 1 = 3 / 1 which implies 3 = 3 or simplifying further 3). In this case 1 truly represents multiplication and division because it's implied in the number itself. However that's another discussion.

Cheers,
-X

[edit on 1-11-2009 by Xtraeme]



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 03:37 PM
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Here's something else to lose sleep over;

given the number line 123456789, ignoring zero:

8*2 = 16, 1 + 6 = 7
8*3 = 24, 2 + 4 = 6
8*4 = 32, 3 + 2 = 5
it decreases by one each time, looping around back to 9 and continuing

Now for 7's:

7*2 = 14, 1 + 4 = 5
7*3 = 21, 2 + 1 = 3
7*4 = 28, 8 + 2 = 10, 1 + 0 = 1
7*5 = 35, 3 + 5 = 8
it decreases by 2 each time, looping

6's:

6*2 = 12, 1 + 2 = 3
6*3 = 18, 1 + 8 = 9
6*4 = 24, 2 + 4 = 6
it decreases by 3 each time, looping



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 03:29 AM
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reply to post by LiquidLight
 


Damn you for stealing my sleep


Yeah, I agree it is interesting. Although number 9 is the topic of this thread, I can't discredit your post for not keeping on the topic. Your post was interesting - thank you


-v



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 03:46 AM
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reply to post by Xtraeme
 



Originally posted by Xtraeme
Anyways happy to help, hopefully the explanations make it a little bit clearer why 9 behaves the way it does in multiplication.


Indeed it does, thank you!


Originally posted by Xtraeme
A lot of times people obsess over the "why?" rather than the "how." The longer you simply do the "how" the easier it becomes to understand "why." Trig for instance was a huge hurdle for me back in high school because I had to accept that this "Sine" and "Cosine" function were black-boxes that I couldn't compute by hand.


Couldn't agree much more. It is the understanding that allows one to operate with something in wholly mannered way. If one lacks understanding, maybe one can still use it, but when more profound action is required, those not understanding usually find themselves swamped.

Driving a car is another good example: I can go about my business using car as long as it operates flawlessly, but should it break down, I might not able to do anything unless I haven't got more profound understanding about the cars, so that I am able to fix it (to fill the tank with gasoline, in most basic of situations).


Originally posted by Xtraeme
For the record I do believe certain numbers are more than just an abstract sequence.


It seems to be the case. It almost makes me to want start studying the philosophy behind the mathematics - it is rather interesting; as I mentioned some posts above, it seems like the numbers derive from nature itself.

-v

[edit on 2-11-2009 by v01i0]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 10:46 AM
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Here it is ... app for testing teory on number nine:

www.auroraetthor.si...

To use it just enter number in text box and click test ...
I promised this one yesterday but had hangover
.

[edit on 2.11.2009 by valhala]

The application is in "bin/release" (niner.exe) folder ... source code is provided

[edit on 2.11.2009 by valhala]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by valhala
 


Thank you for uploading it


I downloaded it and will employ it once I'll get my main computer out from repair. Currently I am using a Linux system that does not support .exe files (duh, I am such a newbie with Linux that it might be just me the reason why I cannot get it running!).

By the way, you might want to read this post, where I and Vanitas are suggesting something for you.

Best regards,

-v

[edit on 2-11-2009 by v01i0]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 12:40 PM
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By the way, you might want to read this post, where I and Vanitas are suggesting something for you.


10x for pointing that out ... didn't notice it before (still a little strange feelings from weekend
).
Acctualy I have already programmed another app that specificaly deals with numbers (specialy Rodin's sequences) ... will for sure post some "in depth" info on it once it's completted ... but before that I have to complette "real life" projects (as far as Linux goes I have just installed my new laptop with ubuntu and I'm impressed ... that's the way OS should work as far as I'm concerned
)



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by valhala
 


Hehe, interesting coincidence for I too installed Ubuntu to my backup computer once my main comp broke down and went to repairs. I like it, except the fact that some programs I am used to are not working, but that's like buzz of a fly in my ears - that is quite meaningless


It seems that I have to install Wine to get your program running. Thanks, I will look forward of your results with Rodin's sequences. And maybe that thread too


-v



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by v01i0
 


I wouldn't bother with wine to run that app ... way too much dependencies since it's compiled with .NET framweork 3.0 ... lemme see if I can make quick ubunutu executable in C ...



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by valhala
 


Wait, you don't have to do that for me. I was thinking to make one in Java, but the fact is that I am not best of the programmers so it could take a while. I have already installed Java runtime environment, but I am still figuring out the structure of the program and the functions themselves.

-v



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