It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

ICANN Approves Domain Names We Can't Type

page: 2
9
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 31 2009 @ 01:39 AM
link   

Originally posted by Common Sense says...
Look ICANN has "improved" something that was working just fine to start with. Maybe they can work on "improving sliced bread" next since there is nothing wrong with that either.

I can see it now ICANN announces that the new version of sliced bread is better for everyone, however, it will not fit any electric toasters currenlty in use outisde of Latvia.

Geezzz.....just leave stuff alone already!


I don't understand your logic. If were going to use bread as an example, domains for english speaking countries required a toaster that plugged directly into the outlet with no problem. Other countries needed the complicated adapter.

Now the other countries have their own toasters. I see nothing wrong with that.

Why is it bad to let other countries use letters found in their alphabet? Imagine if domains were completely in japanese up to this point and those of us who spoke english had to learn their letters and how to type them to navigate the internet. We would be relieved and appreciative of a new system allowing our local websites (news, communication, etc) to be in english.

I don't understand why it doesn't go both ways.




posted on Oct, 31 2009 @ 01:42 AM
link   
If you cannot type the URL, chances are you would not be able to read any of the text there anyway.

So what is the point ?

If you are fluent in Farsi, Russian, or Swahili, then it should not be a problem, should it ?

[edit on 31/10/2009 by Silver Shadow]



posted on Oct, 31 2009 @ 01:50 AM
link   

Originally posted by tribewilder
This is very bad news indeed as you have stated, you won't know what link you are "clicking" or where you are going.

I don't know how the companies that monitor phishing sites will be able to keep up if many legitimate sites start using these characters.

A sad day for the internet indeed.

Are we talking about clicking on search engines? is so this problem is nothing new, that is why we have tones of protections.



posted on Oct, 31 2009 @ 02:07 AM
link   
reply to post by Traffic
 


Biggest difference is that most other countries have a lot of english speakers, while the majority english-centric countries don't speak mandarin or greek or what-have-you.

I'm not really bothered by this though. If I don't understand the link, I likely won't understand the site, which means I won't really have a problem passing up the link and just not clicking on it. Heck, I do that now, even though I can understand all the characters.



posted on Oct, 31 2009 @ 02:16 AM
link   
I'm sorry...

ICANNOT read your web address.

-



posted on Oct, 31 2009 @ 02:26 AM
link   
reply to post by Lilitu
 




I think it is fair to assume that if they cannot type
it they cannot read it so why bother?


It's not that simple. What you see is not neccesarily what you get. Just because you can type a character on your computer, and just because I can type that same character on my computer, does not neccesarily mean that our computers used the same encoding when those characters were generated.

I described this in my first post in the thread.

I'm not saying it's the end of the world. I'm not even saying it won't work. But it's not as simple as it may appear from the perspective of the end user. If the people involved don't know what they're doing, you may end up with situations where somebody can type in a URL, have it look exactly like the correct URL, but it won't work because the encodings don't match.

Dissimilar encodings have been dealt with in the past. At one time somebody had to make 8-bit ascii pcs talk to 7-bit ebcdic mainframes. It can be done. Presumably it will be done.

I just hope the people doing it aren't from the same group of people who saw Independance Day and think you can hook up any two computers in the universe and have them instantly talk to each other.



外人


ざけんなよ

[edit on 31-10-2009 by LordBucket]



posted on Oct, 31 2009 @ 11:59 AM
link   

Originally posted by LordBucket

ざけんなよ

[edit on 31-10-2009 by LordBucket]


Who is joking? Tis not I.



posted on Oct, 31 2009 @ 12:12 PM
link   
I think most of you are thinking about this in the wrong way. This will help people who have different keyboards, they do exist, and the internet is not English only...get over it.



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 06:01 AM
link   
SWEET! Now I can finally register www.卐.com to troll minorities.
Seriously, this will ruin the internet as we know it. There are so many characters that look like other things, the number of phishing sites will explode overnight.



btw, the 卐 is a Chinese character, not a swastika, I just wanted to make a point.

[edit on 1-11-2009 by Happyfeet]



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 09:21 PM
link   

Originally posted by Happyfeet
www.卐.com


Somebody beat you to it.

http://卐.com/



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 09:44 PM
link   
As far as business goes, I don't think it will effect most major companies who deal with large English speaking nations / most of the world. Think about it. Would a giant Chinese or Japanese company solely make a website that isn't easy to navigate, have an easily accessible URL, or at the very least have an option for English speaking customers / partners? Most, international companies already do this on their main-page when they ask you select a language. They'll probably register 2 or 3+ domains now so that people using non-standard keyboards can access them more effectively. Its all about profit, and believe me, this is going to bring in a lot of dollars.

It could pose some problems for security, but I'm sure they'll find a standard way of deciphering those wild and zainy characters into something the normal latin-char based system can interpret. Think of it as a challenge waiting to be completed, not a problem that will never be solved.

Unlike Net-neutrality and censorship... which is a real problem the US might be facing soon enough.

[edit on 1-11-2009 by iamoverrated]



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 10:12 PM
link   
reply to post by LordBucket
 


Re: encoding - I think you're overestimating the scope of that particular problem. I very rarely need to change the encoding on my browser to display a page. Maybe 1 in 100 Japanese language pages requires me to change the settings on firefox. As far as input goes, I used to have a problem sending and receiving keitai texts on my yahoo and hotmail accounts - but it's been well over a year since that's been resolved.

There are issues to be dealt with, but I don't think it's something that can't be handled by improving the auto-detect capabilities of browsers.



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 10:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by m0r1arty

I can't reply as I only have permission to post new news threads




Hang on. How does that work?

can anyone clarify? Aside from the OP, apparently...



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 10:31 PM
link   
At first I thought this would just bring about mass confusion, but now I think I get it. - No Problem!

However, as more and more "foreign" language characters are being used on websites, such as the swastika looking thing above, how do we get them to show up correctly. I know the shape being referred to but my FF browser just shows a little box with numbers in it.

Is there some setting I need to change so these things display the way intended??



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 10:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by wayno
At first I thought this would just bring about mass confusion, but now I think I get it. - No Problem!

However, as more and more "foreign" language characters are being used on websites, such as the swastika looking thing above, how do we get them to show up correctly. I know the shape being referred to but my FF browser just shows a little box with numbers in it.

Is there some setting I need to change so these things display the way intended??


Download the language packs.

For FireFox



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 10:54 PM
link   
I dun like da idear of this here "foreign" characterz bein' used here on da 'merican internets. If u wantin to be a foreiner, you shuld go back to yer foreign land like russia or asia or wherevere ya camed frum and use yer own internet n'stead of using our 'merican internet. We here invented tha thing, so effin ya'll wantin ta use it, you use it like we dun made it!

Stay off muh merican internet wit yer foreign character mumbo jumbo ching chong speak. We dun not take kindly here ta yer non english speakin type, likes i saids befoe if ya'll wantin ta use that swahili forest dwellar speakin, get off yer tree rock cumputar and get on a real home made 'merican internet computer machine an' use a real 'merican keyboard with the A trough Z alfabet.



posted on Nov, 1 2009 @ 11:39 PM
link   
reply to post by Silver Shadow
 


So you're saying we don't have to use the "standard" metric system, even though it'd be easier for the world?

Sweet!

Who needs standardization, right? Now we get to keep miles, feet and inches!

[edit on 1-11-2009 by ghaleon12]



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 03:17 PM
link   
reply to post by LordBucket
 


After a little more research, apparently this has been in the works for 13 years.

From what I can tell, they're actually not doing quite what's being advertised. Domain names aren't using non-standard characters at all. They've simply created a lookup table to matches non-standard characters to sequences of standard characters, and all URLs are composed purely of those standard characters.

For example, 卐.com mentioned above is actually xn--zkr.com, but when someone types in 卐.com the lookup table is consulted and they're directed to xn--zkr.com, and it's up to the web browser to maintain the illusion.

I suppose it's not a bad solution. Lookup tables are what DNS is all about anyway. The domain names that we see aren't "real" either. 卐.com and xn--zkr.com are really just common names for IP:65.99.223.191.

Looks like the system does have some problems though. I notice, for example, that when I type 卐.com into a hostname to IP converter I get an error, even though the real domain name of xn--zkr.com works fine. Also...from what I gather, because of the number of bytes used inthe encoding process there's a very real limit to the number of non-standard characters a URl can contain. Ordinarily domain names are allowed 63 characters, but it looks like each non-standard character "uses" 7 standard characters, so for every non standard character you lose 7 from your 63 limit, not one. So a domain name using purely non-standard characters would have an absolute limit of 9 characters. The wiki entry for IDN also states that the algorithms involved "can fail in several ways" but they only give one example.

Anyway...looks about like I first suggested. Can be made to work...but prone to problems.



new topics

top topics



 
9
<< 1   >>

log in

join