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Russia hopes U.S. lifts Cuba embargo

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posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 02:26 AM
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Russia hopes U.S. lifts Cuba embargo


en.rian.ru

October 29 (RIA Novosti) - Russia hopes the U.S. administration will lift the economic embargo on Cuba, a deputy Russian envoy told the UN General Assembly.

"We believe that preservation of a trade, economic and financial blockade of Cuba on the part of the United States is counterproductive, is an anachronism and does not meet current realia," Mikhail Savostyanov said Wednesday.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 02:26 AM
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Now that we have Obama, who seems to be anti American, anti business, pro NWO, friends of Markist- Lennonists and on and on, the time is right to cozy up to Obama's good friend Fidel and make history!

I just hope I'm wrong! Everything about this is wrong. Preservation of trade, economic and financial blockade of Cuba on the part of the United States is mandatory!




Under Barack Obama, the U.S. has loosened money transfer and travel restrictions on Americans with relatives in Cuba, but demanded political and economic reforms from the country as condition for lifting the embargo

There is hope, however! But hopefully not "Hope and Change!"

en.rian.ru
(visit the link for the full news article)


[edit on 29/10/09 by plumranch]



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 11:32 AM
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Oh PLUMRANCH, I don't want to be the one to burst your bubble but this is a sure thing.
Not only does Obama owe Russia for the help with:
Isreal, China, Iran, ...
but the liberals also love Fidel.

The time has come to join with our brothers in Cuba in a spirit of prosperity & growth.

Forget about the criminals they sent to out shores.
Forget about the boat refugees still trying to escape.

Hug your Cuban brother with true liberal love!



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by plumranch
 



They can urge all they want. The fact of the matter is that Obama has been loosening the noose for months already. I say the Russians are just Showboating to get their name in the papers. Trying to spin this and get some glory for what has already been happening.


U.N. again condemns U.S. embargo of Cuba

The vote was 187-3, with two abstentions, as the United Nations once again denounced the U.S. embargo of Cuba.

``Here we go again,'' Ambassador Susan Rice said. ``I suppose old habits die hard . . . We will not respond in kind to painfully familiar rhetoric that we have heard in years past -- rather, I am prepared to acknowledge that there is a new chapter to this old story.''

She stressed that the Obama administration had renewed family visits to the island and loosened restrictions on U.S. telecommunications companies to do business in Cuba. Talks are under way for direct mail and migration, she said, and the American companies last year sold Cuba some $700 million in food. In 2008, the United States was Cuba's No. 5 trade partner.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 



The vote was 187-3, with two abstentions


Yes, but Israel and Palau, a country of 21,000 people in the Pacific, voted with us, and Micronesia and the Marshall Islands abstained. Who needs the rest of the world?

reference :ibid



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by Doctor G
 



The time has come to join with our brothers in Cuba in a spirit of prosperity & growth. Forget about the criminals they sent to out shores. Forget about the boat refugees still trying to escape. Hug your Cuban brother with true liberal love!


Agreed!

I don't think most Americans know how bad conditions are down there because of Castro's socialism. Lifting the ban could help bring about an expose'?



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by plumranch
 


Once the flood gates open there will be a huge influx of money. Cuba is a beautiful place. [outside of Cuban cities] It's close and very inexpensive.

In ten years it will be a vacation paradise.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 01:52 PM
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Im sure that there are still bitter feelings in Washington over the missile crisis.For those too young or not up on your history the U.S.and Russians were on the brink.I think we're damn lucky to have survived that little game of one-upsmanship.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 01:56 PM
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Why is the embargo still in affect?

As I understand it, the embargo was established with the intent to cripple and eventually topple F. Castro's regime and as a defense to possible future USSR threat against US (a reason for Guantanamo). The embargo restrictions continued to become increasingly restrictive over the many years. Articles and papers going back to the end of the Cold War indicate the imminent collapse of the regime, due in part to the decline of the Soviet empire.

However, that has yet to happen...

In fact, the restriction of Cuba to US influence (both govt. and citizen) seems to have reinforced F. Castro's stronghold on the island. The economic embargo has created significant humanitarian and economic hardships for the people; not Castro and his officials.

There is also the argument of foreign investments. The US is barred from competition, thus weakening any influence that may have been had over the social and infrastructure developments. R. Castro has indicated willingness to open discussions regarding humanitarian concerns as well as many other issues.

It seems that 40+ years of essential standstill between the two countries warrant a re-evaluation of the status-quo...

*General Info*
Embargo time-line

[edit on 30-10-2009 by LadySkadi]



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 06:30 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 


Why the Cuban Trade Embargo Should Be Maintained

I didn't find current info but here is a perspective:


The United States first imposed a trade embargo on Cuba on February 3, 1962, in response to Castro's confiscation of privately owned properties and other productive assets, as well as his aggressive support for violent communist revolution throughout the Western Hemisphere. The original goals of the embargo were to compel Castro to open Cuba's economy and establish democracy, to weaken Cuba's communist regime, and to force Castro to relinquish power. From the beginning, however, many industrialized countries have refused to cooperate with U.S. policy towards communist Cuba and have continued to maintain diplomatic and trade relations with the dictatorship. This includes such important U.S. partners as Canada and Mexico.

We forget that Cuba has a history of being an aggressive and dangerous neighbor. Castro was always supporting some nasty revolution in Africa or South America, shunning the US at every turn.


The basic orientation of the hard-liners surrounding Castro is to contain and restrict all initiatives that unleash individual entrepreneurship and creativity. For example, the government has arrested people for earning "too much" money in the dollarized informal economy, the variety of legally permitted "family businesses" has been restricted, and tax rates on the income of self- employed Cubans have been increased. Moreover, Cuba's constitution and legislation specifically prohibit all private initiative, notwithstanding recent reforms allowing self-employment by Cubans in approximately 140 categories of economic activity from which all professionals (the core of any middle class) are expressly barred. For over three decades, the regime has operated on the basis of divide and rule. Castro's bitter enmity toward the Cuban exile community precludes the possibility of replicating in the Caribbean what China's exile community has accomplished in China.

I remember in the 60s and 70s Castro was a mean dude!



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 06:38 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 

No doubt the Russians are overstating a bit. Here's what Obama said a 17 months ago: Obama Promises To Maintain Cuban Embargo

"Obama (D-IL) promised to continue the economic embargo against the Castro regime until political and social freedoms are brought to Havana.

Directly addressing a crucial issue to Cuban-American immigrants in Florida, Obama said strongly; "I will maintain the embargo. It provides us with the leverage to present the regime with a clear choice: if you take significant steps toward democracy, beginning with the freeing of all political prisoners, we will take steps to begin normalizing relations. That's the way to bring about real change in Cuba - through strong, smart and principled diplomacy."
Oh yes, and this: LOL


"Now let me be clear. John McCain's been going around the country talking about how much I want to meet with Raul Castro, as if I'm looking for a social gathering. That's never what I've said, and John McCain knows it," Obama explained.






[edit on 29/10/09 by plumranch]



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 06:45 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 


I wish the Castro regime would reopen negotiations with the US and promise to establish free trade areas in Cuba similar to the China model where US companies and interests can be safe from nationalization and heavy taxation. That would be a win win situation, but apparently the Castro regime suffers a bad case of paranoia.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 10:56 PM
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Cuba has been stating that it would be open and willing to talks with the US at all levels, for some time and most recently again at the UN General Assembly.


"We are prepared to have a dialogue with the government of the United States at any level," the foreign minister told AP after the vote, adding that such talks must be held on the basis of mutual respect and sovereignty.

He reiterated that Cuba formally offered in July to hold expanded talks with the United States to cooperate in combatting terrorism and drug trafficking, and to work together to fight natural disasters, among other things.

"We are waiting for the North American response," Rodriguez said. He also said Cuba has been pleased by progress of ongoing talks on migration and re-establishing direct mail service. He called those discussions "productive and respectful."


Having said that, it seems that tensions are difficult to set aside...


"The blockade is an uncultured act of arrogance," Rodriguez said. He likened the policy to "an act of genocide" that is "ethically unacceptable."

U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice reacted strongly, calling the Cuban diplomat's statements "hostile" and "straight out of the Cold War era." "Here we go again," she said of Rodriguez's speech. "I suppose old habits die hard."

link

I question to what degree the Cuban American political sway is in the decision to maintain the embargo. How much weight does the population have considering the large numbers in key election state [Florida]? I would presume this consideration would be very relevant to any politician who needs to consider Florida for the future.

Also, one must wonder if the slow 'thawing' of relations and easing of certain embargo restrictions possibly due to the ailing health and age of F. Castro and the positioning for embargo lift upon his death? Does it matter if F. Castro dies considering R. Castro (though some say is more moderate) will continue his charge... I'm sure there is some plan on [brothers] Castro part for a successor who is likely to be of similar ideology.

I still feel like almost 50 years is long enough! It's time to move forward...



[edit on 30-10-2009 by LadySkadi]



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 


I agree. Strd!




Also, one must wonder if the slow 'thawing' of relations and easing of certain embargo restrictions possibly due to the ailing health and age of F. Castro and the positioning for embargo lift upon his death? Does it matter if F. Castro dies considering R. Castro (though some say is more moderate) will continue his charge... I'm sure there is some plan on [brothers] Castro part for a successor who is likely to be of similar ideology..


Therein lies the problem! However:Raul Castro's Reforms Raise Expectations in Cuba



As Cuba's president, Raul Castro has made clear he intends to govern differently than his brother Fidel. He's favoring practical policies over ideology, and he's encouraging Cubans to air their grievances about the government. Fidel Castro was more likely to scold them. Whether the new reforms are meaningful is a matter of debate.



The shortage of basic food products at affordable prices is one of the big complaints in Cuba. Raul Castro has said over and over that he is determined to improve the quality of daily life for Cubans. He is not a charismatic leader, and if he is to maintain any support for his government, he will have to deliver on that commitment. In a speech last summer, he promised "structural changes" in the economic system to improve production. Agriculture is his top priority.



posted on Oct, 30 2009 @ 12:05 AM
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If the US ever wants Cuba to go to a democracy, they should open the doors and trade with Cuba.

The main problem was always coming from the generation that felt forced to leave and lost family under Castro's regime.

They're getting older now and less influential. Open trade, let the accumulation of wealth and property begin to once again take root, and it will all be good. Nothing like capitalism to beat collectivism.

And I hope they hurry. We in the US are taking giant steps backwards.

Besides, Cuban cigars are way too expensive and difficult to obtain right now. I'm down to my last two.



posted on Oct, 30 2009 @ 12:08 AM
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That Embargo should have ended long ago.

When Reagan said Bring down the wall, Russia should have told him to end the embargo.

Just look at all the other dictators we do business with. Don't seem to be a problem accepting their money or making deals with them.



posted on Oct, 30 2009 @ 12:24 AM
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Perhaps the easing of the travel restrictions [for family] will help to move it along faster... many 'younger' generations will have grown up in the US and may have a more modern approach to the future. Ideally, just by returning to the island to visit family members will bring some much needed influence to the direction Cuba may go in the future. Also, additional influx of money and resources.

ed: sp

[edit on 30-10-2009 by LadySkadi]



posted on Oct, 30 2009 @ 01:48 AM
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reply to post by dooper
 





Besides, Cuban cigars are way too expensive and difficult to obtain right now. I'm down to my last two.


Dam right!


But like I mentioned earlier. All I remember after 1959 was how nasty and unmanageable the Castro regime has been vis a vis the West.

Even Obama who we all would imagine would have a love fest with Raul and Fidel is saying he will not lift the embargo without a lot of democratic concessions! Go figure!



posted on Oct, 30 2009 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 





Perhaps the easing of the travel restrictions [for family] will help to move it along faster... many 'younger' generations will have grown up in the US and may have a more modern approach to the future. Ideally, just by returning to the island to visit family members will bring some much needed influence to the direction Cuba may go in the future. Also, additional influx of money and resources.


Guess that already has been done but the Cubans are still unhappy:US moves to ease travel insufficient: Cuba



UNITED NATIONS - The Cuban government considers US President Barack Obama’s decision to end restrictions on Cuban-Americans’ travel and remittances to the island to be “insufficient”, Havana’s diplomatic representatives said here. “The media and diplomatic offensive implemented by the US government could induce some, mistakenly, to believe that the dismantling of the embargo has begun,” Cuba’s delegation to the UN said in a statement. The measures adopted by Washington “repair, in part, a serious injustice, … (but) they are insufficient and of very limited scope” because they return “to the situation existing in … family relations in the year 2004, when the embargo against Cuba was in full force”, the Cuban mission said. The US restrictions were ended Sep 3, when the Treasury Department issued new regulations stipulating that US citizens with “close family” on the island, such as aunts and uncles, and first and second cousins, can visit Cuba as many times as they like and remain for any amount of time with no US restriction. About 1.5 million Americans have family on the communist-ruled island.


[edit on 30/10/09 by plumranch]



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