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What is your biggest blessing in disguise in Life???

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posted on Oct, 24 2009 @ 02:38 PM
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If you look back over your life, and thought about any moment or bad things that turned out to be good for you in other ways. So what was your biggest blessing in disguise moment. You do not have to say to personnel thing if you do not want.

Mine was not being interested in females. Something that has brought an awful lot of problems in my life since school, but one thing is for sure i am glad today that i was this way, and society had the problem not me. People can be rotten, with there mob rule, and trying to push you into what they want you to be in life. I think after 17 years of grieve over this, finally my life might be mine, and people may accept it once and for all. My main blessing in disguise.

Peace within ones self is all people need, no matter what others think.

So whats yours.




posted on Oct, 24 2009 @ 03:25 PM
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Hmm for me it would have to be knowing too much, and by that I mean my belief that we are witnessing the 'end times' and things are not the way it seems- both through our eyes and through the lips of those who are in power.

So what happened as a result of that- I didn't follow some schools or careers because I knew some aspects of it were fraudulent, like conspiracies in medicine, conspiracies about technology, there seems like there's a conspiracy in everything nowdays.

I mean everything. Metals, food, water, contamination, vaccines, Georgia Guidestones, elites, corruption, mkultura, brown dwarf, underground bases, missing money. I could go on and on. I almost miss the time when I was about 8 or 10 with just one belief that the government was covering up aliens.

Now it's everything, with the very recent realization that almost everyone in North America alone is technically a slave. THANKS ATS


Is my blessing in disguise not being involved with these fields, because I would have worked for something that was also a lie?

I will never believe Ignorance is truly bliss though. That's what 'they' want us to think.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by andy1033
 


Saturday 15 August 1998. A day that changed me forever and made me leave the army a few years later. For many people in Omagh it wasn't a blessing, but for me it led to new path.

A blessing found in misery.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by Sam Vimes
reply to post by andy1033
 


Saturday 15 August 1998. A day that changed me forever and made me leave the army a few years later. For many people in Omagh it wasn't a blessing, but for me it led to new path.

A blessing found in misery.


I have never been in the army, but that day must of been bad. Weird how things can be blessings, even though they are hell at the time. You better of out of that stuff.

To the other poster, i do not think ignorance is bliss, i think ignorance is dangerous, to our safety.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 12:55 PM
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For me it's being autistic. Most people mistakenly think that autism is a disability, but it's absolutely not. My parents are both undiagnosed autistic as well, so I grew up without being repeatedly told that I had a disability, and instead of being told I couldn't do this or that, or having low expectations of me because of "my problem", I was brought up like any other perfectly healthy child, and grew into a perfect healthy, well balanced autist.

Autism isn't a disease, it's an archetype. We need to stop limiting our species by thinking that anything that deviates from the majority is "abnormal".



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 12:56 PM
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just over a year ago I was in a car accident, my fault(and a coyote's), hat almost killed my girlfriend and I.

I swerved to avoid a coyote that came off the hill during a camping trip on the Nehelem River, and we ended up sliding off the road, 75 feet down a ravine, rolling over(end over end) at least twice(she thinks it was 3 times). The rear of the car was ripped completely off, along with the front wheels.

We both walked away without a scratch on us.

Since that day, we both have had a different take on life. We try more to help people. We notice the small, beauty of the world more. And we are closer than ever before.

I'd also say that tearing a ligament in my back during highschool, which cost me a scholarship to run hurdles for U of O, was a blessing in disguise. I had a serious addiction problem in those days, and had I gone away to school, there would have been no turning back. The injury forced me to re-evaluate my life, and truthfully, saved me from coc aine.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by TheIrvy
For me it's being autistic. Most people mistakenly think that autism is a disability, but it's absolutely not. My parents are both undiagnosed autistic as well, so I grew up without being repeatedly told that I had a disability, and instead of being told I couldn't do this or that, or having low expectations of me because of "my problem", I was brought up like any other perfectly healthy child, and grew into a perfect healthy, well balanced autist.

Autism isn't a disease, it's an archetype. We need to stop limiting our species by thinking that anything that deviates from the majority is "abnormal".


While I agree with your premise, I think you need to remember that the spectrum of Autism is very large, and while some function very well, there are those that it is a true disability, and affect every aspect of their lives.

Asperger's patients, for example, generally struggle with normal communication skills. That affects their everyday life, very much. It is a disability.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 01:12 PM
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similar to the OP, i see a distinct advantage to being gay.

the way i figure it, every individual on this planet can reasonably expect to lay claim to only ONE accomplishment during their lifetime.

being gay has allowed me to not get too mixed up with marriage, children, and other relationship concerns. it certainly has been a mixed blessing, but i have had the time and resources to devote to other persuits.

......

at any rate, i am happy to have found myself, by default, on the fringes of society. i wouldnt have it any other way.




posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by tgidkp
 


Too right, there are loads of advantages, shame alot of males cannot accept you as a friend though for not liking females, but thats ok.

As long as your at peace with yourself.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 01:15 PM
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I have Asperger's, and I spent 5 years working as a care worker for people with more profound autism. I know full well that it's a spectrum, and at different times in my life I've been at different points in that spectrum.

If autistic children were dealt with appropriately, and given the same level of expectation that "normal" children were, we wouldn't have that view of autistic people. There are differences, the methods for learning are different, and there are other considerations, but at the same time there are considerations that are needed for "normal" children that are quite unneccessary for autists.

And please, whilst each individual autistic person is different (just as every non-autistic person is different), I do think that I'm slightly more qualified to talk about autism than a non-autistic person. I wouldn't presume to lecture a woman on what it's like to be female.

[edit on 28-10-2009 by TheIrvy]



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by TheIrvy
I have Asperger's, and I spent 5 years working as a care worker for people with more profound autism. I know full well that it's a spectrum, and at different times in my life I've been at different points in that spectrum.

If autistic children were dealt with appropriately, and given the same level of expectation that "normal" children were, we wouldn't have that view of autistic people. There are differences, the methods for learning are different, and there are other considerations, but at the same time there are considerations that are needed for "normal" children that are quite unneccessary for autists.

And please, whilst each individual autistic person is different (just as every non-autistic person is different), I do think that I'm slightly more qualified to talk about autism than a non-autistic person.


I work with autistic children for a living. I have students that are at all ends of the spectrum. That you have autism in no way makes you more qualified to speak on it than I, given my experience. In fact, I would say it makes you less so, as you are biased in your point of view.

I do agree that how they are handled does have a lot of baring on their mindset. Many are at a disadvantage because they have been told they are at a disadvantage. I also agree that some autistics are actually better off, as far as problem solving and the such.

To say that it is not a disability is absolutely false though. To some, it is as much a disability, if not moreso, than downs.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 02:06 PM
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This is supposed to be a thread about counting our blessings!

captaintyinknots, thank you, you've just illustrated my point. I'm less qualified to speak on autism because I'm autistic? Are you less qualified to teach children if you are a parent? Would a dyslexic teacher's bias mean that they were less able to help dyslexic children how to read?

How can you possibly teach the children in your class how to grow up into well adjusted, capable autistic adults? I've worked in care. I know how it's viewed, and the insight I was able to offer based on my "bias" of actually knowing what it's like to be autistic, and understanding why that outburst happened, of being able to see from behind the same eyes allowed my team to change how we dealt with our autistic members, and they became more relaxed, less frustrated, and generally happier and far more communicative.

Autistic children are disabled. They're disabled by being taught by people who haven't the first clue what it's like to walk in their shoes, who've been trained by people who aren't autistic either, and are following a programme of care that does not take into account the actual needs of an autistic person, and instead try to train them to be less autistic. Again to use the gender example, it's like a male teacher encouraging his female pupils to pee standing up, because that's the "proper" way to do it.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by TheIrvy
This is supposed to be a thread about counting our blessings!

captaintyinknots, thank you, you've just illustrated my point. I'm less qualified to speak on autism because I'm autistic? Are you less qualified to teach children if you are a parent? Would a dyslexic teacher's bias mean that they were less able to help dyslexic children how to read?

How can you possibly teach the children in your class how to grow up into well adjusted, capable autistic adults? I've worked in care. I know how it's viewed, and the insight I was able to offer based on my "bias" of actually knowing what it's like to be autistic, and understanding why that outburst happened, of being able to see from behind the same eyes allowed my team to change how we dealt with our autistic members, and they became more relaxed, less frustrated, and generally happier and far more communicative.

Autistic children are disabled. They're disabled by being taught by people who haven't the first clue what it's like to walk in their shoes, who've been trained by people who aren't autistic either, and are following a programme of care that does not take into account the actual needs of an autistic person, and instead try to train them to be less autistic. Again to use the gender example, it's like a male teacher encouraging his female pupils to pee standing up, because that's the "proper" way to do it.


Considering that you are absolutely from a biased point of view, I think it at east has to be noted. You cannot possibly claim you are MORE qualified to speak on the subject just because you are autistic.

Is a Down's child more qualified to speak on down's syndrome because they have it? Absolutely not.

Is a parent qualified to teach their child quantum physics just because they are a parent? Of course not.

As far as you dyslexic example, if that dislexic teacher is denying their disability(which, once again, it is), then yes, it does make them less qualified.

Now obviously we are talking about two very different things, but you get my point. You have to qualify yourself with this, otherwise, you come off as looking defensive and not wanting to admit your disability(which it is, whether you like it or not).

As for how I can teach children, I'm not going to get into that I am VERY good at what I do. I have had extensive training. And I do not need to be autistic to be able to break down outbursts, to understand why they happened, and to help work through them. All it takes is compassion and understanding.

Obviously, this is a subject that hits close to home for you, and you are not going to accept an "outsider's" point of view, and that's fine. But dont fool yourself. You are no more qualified as a definitive authority on autism than a serial rapist is on rape.

Sure, they can understand what its like when it is happening, but most have very little insight as to WHY it happens.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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December of 2007.

I was terrified of "reality" and loneliness.

I did not "get" humans or the body that I perceive through.

I hurt others to my benefit.

I traded life with drugs and alcohol.

I received a DUI.

I cheated on my girlfriend.

I attempted suicide, twice.

I traveled outside of my body.

I became aware of awareness.

I noticed energy in everything.

I noticed auras and synchronicity.

I started living life the way I wanted life to be.

I noticed others doing the same.

I am now aware that this is only the beginning.

I am here now (despite all of this being VERY personal) telling you how this all came about.




It is not about "me" anymore, it is about "us." Thank you for listening and yes, this is only the beginning.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:02 PM
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I think you need to talk to a few more high functioning autistic people. I've been on training to "understand" autism through my work, and I've kept my eye on new developments and new "programmes", and they all show a complete lack of understanding of the nature of autism, and the causes and proper remedies for outbursts.

I'm 35, I have an iq of 145, I have a modest but valued group of friends, I'm in a successful relationship that's been a huge part of both my education and my non-autistic partner's for the past 6 years. I'm widely regarded as the best graphic designer in my area, and a big part of my job is dealing with members of the public and business owners. I have to talk with them, find out what they want to accomplish, explain my ideas and suggestions, and generally do a heck of a lot of talking with people that I'm not supposed to be "able" to do. I learnt how to mimic social skills, and true, some days it comes easier than others, but there are reasons for that. And they're not what you think. I was upfront with my boss about my autism, and between us we tried a few different ways of working, and ended up settling on a simple way of organising the office that meant everyone was able to work well together without any need for me to ever mention again that I was autistic. Autism is not an excuse, it's not a reason to not bother, it doesn't need "special" treatment, it just needs to be recognised and understood.

I don't know whether you're male or female, and I shan't presume, but whichever you are you're bound to know that there are fundamental and consistant differences between the two beyond the reproductive organs. Male brains are constructed differently and consistantly than female brains. Broadly speaking, men are better suited to certain tasks or social structures than women, and equally the opposite is true as well, there are areas where women can easily outperform men. These differences are not viewed as disabilities, altho they are widely ignored for reasons of political correctness. Nevertheless, they do exist. When a woman joins a business that has previously had an all male staff, there can be tensions, difficulties, and changes will inevitably have to be made to accomodate the differences between the sexes. This isn't special treatment for a disability, and neither are the accomodations that, if in place, mean that autism presents no more of a problem in the workplace than gender.

Autistic people also have recognisable and consistant differences in the biology of their brains. These differences are not due to illness or deformation, they are clear structural changes of the same order as the differences between a male brain and a female brain. One article I read on the subject went through a list of the differences in the autistic brain, and pointed out that in most of the cases, the differences are in fact an advantage, and in the case of the mini-columns of the brain, the autistic design is a clear improvement on the non-autistic one. The same article then went on to discuss how we could alter the autistic brain to remove these advantages.

I could very easily list a set of behavioural and social disorders that non autistic people are disabled by, that we autistic people have got sorted by design.

This isn't the first time that "differences" have been treated as disabilities. My dad told me of the absolute terror he experienced as a young left-handed child. It was standard practise in schools not terribly long ago to tie children's left hands to the arm of their chairs, to force them to use their right hand to write with, in order to make them "normal".



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:05 PM
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It is not about "me" anymore, it is about "us."


If more people realised that we would live in a far better world than we do now.

It's very easily to allow mistakes and failures get on top of you, and you can feel your only option is to give up. It takes an enlightened person to realise that all of those things are the lessons we learn from, and without them we'd still be children, having learnt nothing.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:17 PM
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posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:19 PM
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Evil is a blessing in disguise that confronts us all.

If not for our perceptions of what is evil, we would have a much harder time motivating ourselves.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by TheIrvy
10 Myths About Autism - Debunked


These are hardly little known facts....I'm left wondering what your point is....these are the first things learned by those of us who work with autistic children....



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:39 PM
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So you were taught that the medical professions actually know very little about autism, and are finding out new information daily, which makes any training you had incorrect and out of date, and yet you still claim to understand the learning and developmental needs of an autistic person better than an actual high functioning autistic person, who has also spent years teaching and working with autistic children?




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