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Scientists bend nanowires into 2-D and 3-D structures

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posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 06:03 PM
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October 21st, 2009
BY STEVE BRADT

Taking nanomaterials to a new level of structural complexity, scientists have determined how to introduce kinks into arrow-straight nanowires, transforming them into zigzagging two- and three-dimensional structures with correspondingly advanced functions. The work is described this week in the journal Nature Nanotechnology by Harvard University researchers led by Bozhi Tian and Charles M. Lieber.

Among other possible applications, the authors say, the new technology could foster a new nanoscale approach to detecting electrical currents in cells and tissues.


www.physorg.com...



This is a false-color scanning electron microscope image of the zigzag nanowires in which the straight sections are separated by triangular joints and specific device functions are precisely localized at the kinked junctions in the nanowires.


This is a false-color scanning electron microscope image of the zigzag nanowires in which the straight sections are separated by triangular joints and specific device functions are precisely localized at the kinked junctions in the nanowires

This research opens up new frontiers in nanotechnology.




posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 06:22 PM
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"We are very excited about the prospects this research opens up for nanotechnology," says Lieber, Mark Hyman, Jr. Professor of Chemistry in Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences. "For example, our nanostructures make possible integration of active devices in nanoelectronic and photonic circuits, as well as totally new approaches for extra- and intracellular biological sensors. This latter area is one where we already have exciting new results, and one we believe can change the way much electrical recording in biology and medicine is carried out."


The medical applications are great. I can invision a precise mapping of the way electric signals flow throughout the body. Making it possible to detect anomolies and abnormalities with great accuracy and little intusiveness.

Very cool stuff Aq1



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by constantwonder
 


You are right about the medical applications, let's just hope they stay away from nano-goo, can you imagine everything getting eaten up.



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