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Petrified Alien Found At Wright Patterson in 2003?

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posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by zaiger
Wow the pictures of the little alien toys really top it off. You could have mentioned that MUCH earlier. Can we move this to the hoax section now?


The little green men picture indeed sealed the satire explanation, as well as the fact that McCook base where the body was supposedly found hasn't even existed for decades.

So it's a satire, that's similar to but not exactly the same as a hoax right? A hoax is meant to look like it's serious, while a satire is meant to look like it's not serious, which is the case with the closed base and the picture of the little green men toys. So maybe put a [Satire] tag in the title, so people will stop discussing this as if it's serious? I agree the title should be tagged to show it's not a serious writing.




posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 09:55 PM
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Crap, I was really disappointed to find that this was only an elaborate hoax. My dad worked at Wright Patterson in the Foreign technology division, and I swear he knows or knows someone who has had access to info on UFO's and ET's.
Besides that, it leaves me with one question though- Why? Why would the author or authors even include something like this? To confuse the heck out of us?
That's all it seems to have been written to do.


[edit on 22-10-2009 by FTD Brat]



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 09:57 PM
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Originally posted by Mayan_Soul
So I just called Dr. Vincent Russo, and he tried to make it very clear to me that it was a "Hoax by somebody". He asked me if I was the one that had emailed him on the subject, and I replied no.

He continued to say "I don't have time to talk about that, it was a hoax by somebody."

There was a strange vibe in the conversation as if he would have done anything to convince me it was all just to be disregarded.

Maybe he was paid off to never mention it again after his retirement.

Sorry guys, I tried my best to find out if Dr. Russo had any information on this topic that seems to put him at the head of it, but whether or not I was lied to or told the true answer, it is disappointing.



Well that's how the elite trap these people.
Using a persons good names in a hoax.
Like you do what we say or we will expose your hoax with aliens.



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 10:59 PM
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Originally posted by FTD Brat
Crap, I was really disappointed to find that this was only an elaborate hoax. My dad worked at Wright Patterson in the Foreign technology division, and I swear he knows or knows someone who has had access to info on UFO's and ET's.
Besides that, it leaves me with one question though- Why? Why would the author or authors even include something like this? To confuse the heck out of us?
That's all it seems to have been written to do.


Some people in this thread mentioned trying to contact the author, if they do maybe they'll get an answer from the source.

But until they do, my guess is that it's either to poke fun at people that think little green men are real, or else to pose a satirical coverup of the fact that Wright Patterson really has or had little green (or gray?) men (or aliens, or time travelers from the future, or what have you)?

The conspiracy theorists will gravitate toward the latter but I tend to favor the former reason. Or maybe the only little green men they had were the ones in the picture



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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Well the author should know first hand, we hope, about the alien.
His involving the good doctor might then be wondered.

The doctor as a government worker, knowing the rules of
confidential information, may not be able to confirm the alien presence.
Especially if he were told ET exist and is confidential information.

I can't say the question do you believe in ETs works any better.
Confidential information can not be divulged even if you don't
believe it.

Well the doctor said the alien story was a hoax so that's good enough for me,
no Aliens confirmed in a government document by impeccable source
included in the report.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 08:15 AM
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Something has been bugging the back of my mind on this thread.

The article says the found this "petrified alien" buried at the
old McCook site.

Now, if it was actually buried, and it was a toy, I thought the concept
of aliens, their appearance, didn't come out until the late 30's, early 40's.

Why would a toy be buried that looks like an alien when they hadn't formed
an opinion on what aliens look like back in the 20's.

Can someone help me wrap my mind around this one?



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 10:53 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 10:59 AM
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Again: we do not discuss the status of ATS members, nor do we allow members to use the public forums to discuss bannings.


Why we do not discuss banned or fellow members

Please discuss the topic: Petrified Alien Found At Wright Patterson in 2003? And not fellow members!

Thank you.


[edit on October 23rd 2009 by greeneyedleo]



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 11:00 AM
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I am sorry but discussing any other member in any capacity is against ATS' Privacy Policy:



www.abovetopsecret.com...
If you no longer visit our websites, either through a voluntary decision of your own or some staff action to terminate your account privileges, we do not remove your posts (except for any that might violate our terms & conditions). This is a very big online community with a great deal of content being added every day, removing valid contributions to our discussions would disrupt the context and potentially confuse readers.

Additionally, we do not delete member accounts if you no longer wish to participate. The reasons are very similar to those for not deleting posts.


Why we do not discuss banned or fellow members


ATS take the privacy of any member, active, inactive or banned VERY seriously. That is for the protection of everyone. Visit those links and you will see why we must maintain this policy.

Now can we get back to the topic?



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 11:32 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 11:52 AM
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Originally posted by Brothers in Arms
Something has been bugging the back of my mind on this thread.

The article says the found this "petrified alien" buried at the
old McCook site.

Now, if it was actually buried, and it was a toy, I thought the concept
of aliens, their appearance, didn't come out until the late 30's, early 40's.

Why would a toy be buried that looks like an alien when they hadn't formed
an opinion on what aliens look like back in the 20's.

Can someone help me wrap my mind around this one?


You think a toy was buried.
The document seems to be a relationship illumination attempt between
the base and the surrounding community.
I'm almost sure Alien hype has emanated from the base and that story
pumps up the ritual.
Especially with the arrival of all the Tesla material we can't see.
They might tell us of the arrival on von Braun who sent all the
material to his New Mexico operations but that would be too helpful.

A "petrified alien" means a long term association with that area.
Bogus nonsense however and a lie or hoax as stated by the doctor.
So the story might be some confirmation of bogus stories issued
throughout the base history.
ED: Most likely demanded by TPTB to be issued and written up.
ED+: As some secret TPTB think Tesla was an alien so his technlogy
is alien technology. However Tesla was naturalized citizen the
the technology is citizen technology.




[edit on 10/23/2009 by TeslaandLyne]

[edit on 10/23/2009 by TeslaandLyne]



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 12:28 PM
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did the OP perpetrate this hoax, or did he happen to find it and post it (not knowing it was a hoax)?



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by hikix
did the OP perpetrate this hoax, or did he happen to find it and post it (not knowing it was a hoax)?


the OP simply scanned in a page from a book about wright-patterson that discussed a petrified alien body being discovered in 2003.

if you read through the thread, you'll see that most of the discussion has centered around the question of whether or not the inclusion of this page in the book was intended as a hoax.

the OP didn't perpetrate a hoax and didn't claim that the page was or wasn't a hoax. the book is real and the page really exists as claimed. it's left to the community to work on figuring out the status of the information included therein.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:41 PM
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Originally posted by Brothers in Arms
Something has been bugging the back of my mind on this thread.

The article says the found this "petrified alien" buried at the
old McCook site.

Now, if it was actually buried, and it was a toy, I thought the concept
of aliens, their appearance, didn't come out until the late 30's, early 40's.

Why would a toy be buried that looks like an alien when they hadn't formed
an opinion on what aliens look like back in the 20's.

Can someone help me wrap my mind around this one?


If I wrote an article that said: "the moon is made of green cheese" would that bug the back of your mind too?

The way you wrap your mind around it is to realize its fiction and you can make up and say whatever you want in fiction, it doesn't have to have any accuracy, especially when it's satirical fiction that's just poking fun.

Mods, this should be a reminder, can you please tag the title of this thread [Satire] or [Hoax]? Thanks.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 02:06 PM
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I find this thread fascinating. I am in agreement that with some that have said this article was written to look like a joke, but actually hides some pertinent info.

For example:



McCook was a small field and its missions quickly outgrew the facility. In 1927, Its functions were transferred to Wright Field, now a part of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Major organizations at Wright-Patterson that trace their history to McCook include the Aeronautical Systems Center, Air Force Institute of Technology, Air Force Research Laboratory, National Air and Space Intelligence Center and National Museum of the United States Air Force.

www.aviationdayton.com...

Now how does the National Air and Space Intelligence Center trace it's roots to a base that existed in the 1920's? We didn't even have a space program until the 50's. Am I missing something here?



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 02:22 PM
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If I wrote an article that said: "the moon is made of green cheese" would that bug the back of your mind too?


---

the difference is wright patterson has a history of anomalous events. There is a reason people are interested in this government issued article.


While I agree this is satire, the DR calling it a hoax is strange. Probably semantics, but why not joke or prank. Hoax implies deception. I read more about the DR and a document he wrote in May 2003 on how to recruit top civilian employees. Based on his writing, he appears to be thorough, serious, a by the book type of guy. One not to prank without consideration of his position.

I will say that this article plays perfectly into conspiracy theorist leanings (like me) with real details added into the satire.

For instance, General Jimmy Doolittle, mentioned in the article, had been part of the research of Roswell and Ghost Rockets in Europe.

In 1925 at the McCook Airfield, the role assigned the Engineering Division shifted from design and building of aircraft to acquiring and evaluating aircraft prototypes.

Overall interesting stuff, even from a legitimate historical perspective.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 02:27 PM
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Anybody look in the Table Of Contents? You might find that the piece was listed under fiction.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 02:37 PM
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Originally posted by slyceNow how does the National Air and Space Intelligence Center trace it's roots to a base that existed in the 1920's? We didn't even have a space program until the 50's. Am I missing something here?


Good catch, but I don't think the article means to imply that we had space program-esque activities occurring at McCook. Maybe they just mean to suggest that because McCook was the original aviation research and development field in the country, that programs such as the NASIC--now run out of Wright-Patterson, which inherited McCook's role--naturally owe their lineage to the original airfield?

Of course, if we follow the line of logic which observes the interest UFOs seem to have in the development of our military technology, it doesn't seem out of the question that McCook could have been the site of some strange, pre-1947 sightings. With McCook, we're talking about World War I and the global advent of the aerial military, after all.

A preliminary search doesn't turn up any newspaper reports of airships or anything else around Dayton or McCook specifically between 1917 and 1927, but I'll look further.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by WarrenPiece
Anybody look in the Table Of Contents? You might find that the piece was listed under fiction.


Google only has:




Tells the story of how Dayton, Ohio and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base became America's "Cradle of Aviation".


The Saga implied ET presence in our Aviation History.

ED: I say real intent in the mention of ETs from the holders of
"alien" citizen technology to make a mockery of the situation.



[edit on 10/23/2009 by TeslaandLyne]



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by slyce
Now how does the National Air and Space Intelligence Center trace it's roots to a base that existed in the 1920's? We didn't even have a space program until the 50's. Am I missing something here?


The National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) has an interesting history. I may have missed something but it goes something like this:

1917 - air technical intelligence (ATI) facility at McCook Field studied their first foreign aircraft, a British DeHaviland-4
1920 - the Army ATI facility in Dayton had become the Technical Data Section (TDS)
1927 - ATI relocated to Wright Field (today known as Wright-Patterson Air Force Base)
1940 - renamed to Technical Data Branch
1941 - became the Technical Data Section in a July 1941 reorganization.
1942 - the TDS became the Technical Data Laboratory (TDL).
1945 - T-2 Intelligence, established on 1 July 1945, began the move toward a balanced integration of engineering and intelligence
1951 - On 21 May 1951, the United States Air Force established the Air Technical Intelligence Center (ATIC)
1961 - After ten years, on 1 July 1961, ATIC was inactivated and the Foreign Technology Division (FTD) established
1991 - The Air Force established the Air Force Intelligence Command (AFIC) on 1 October 1991.
1993 - The Air Force redesignated the unit as the National Air Intelligence Center (NAIC) in October 1993
2003 - The Air Force redesignated the unit as the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) in February 2003.

Did I miss anything?

Here are the sources:

www.encyclopedia.com...

at the beginning of World War I, the U.S. Army aeronautical division was woefully unprepared to gather intelligence in or on aircraft. To redress this shortcoming, the Army Signal Corps established an air technical intelligence (ATI) facility at McCook Field near Dayton, Ohio. There, in July 1917, they studied their first foreign aircraft, a British DeHaviland-4.

By 1920, the Army ATI facility in Dayton had become the Technical Data Section (TDS), which relocated in 1927 to Wright Field (today known as Wright-Patterson Air Force Base) near Riverside, Ohio. TDS studied more than 300 captured German aircraft, as well as hundreds of British, French, and Italian planes. Weapons, parachutes, and various airplane parts were also among the materials examined by TDS.


www.airforcehistory.hq.af.mil...


With the ever increasing need to gain information about foreign aircraft, Materiel Division de-emphasized the Museum function at Wright Field, renaming its air intelligence function the Technical Data Branch in February 1940. This became the Technical Data Section in a July 1941 reorganization. From less than 100 people assigned in July 1941, the mission would grow dramatically during the war years until nearly 750 people were assigned by December 1945.

In 1942, the TDS became the Technical Data Laboratory (TDL).

T-2 Intelligence, established on 1 July 1945, began the move toward a balanced integration of engineering and intelligence. The administrative offices of T-2 moved to Building 262 in Area A (today, part of the Air Force Materiel Command headquarters building). A July 1947 T-2 study articulated a three-fold mission for air technical intelligence:

On 21 May 1951, the United States Air Force established the Air Technical Intelligence Center (ATIC) as a field activity of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence. After ten years, on 1 July 1961, ATIC was inactivated and the Foreign Technology Division (FTD) established. The 1950s, then, provided the backdrop against which ATIC performed its mission.

As part of its service-wide reorganization, the Air Force established the Air Force Intelligence Command (AFIC) on 1 October 1991.


www.afisr.af.mil...


HISTORY - NASIC traces its heritage back to 1917 at McCook Field in Dayton, Ohio. The Foreign Technology Division (FTD) marked the beginning of NASIC history in 1961. The Air Force redesignated the unit as the National Air Intelligence Center (NAIC) in October 1993 and the National Air and Space Intelligence Center in February 2003. NASIC unitized into groups and squadrons on 15


Mods are you going to tag this thread a hoax? Because it's a satire, not real.



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