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Learn the way of the sword in books

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posted on Oct, 19 2009 @ 09:01 AM
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Hi,

I want to learn to use a katana properly. But, i cant find any good books/video of techniques. Do you have any ideas? I want a book with techniques, well explained with pictures and/or videos.

Thanks




posted on Oct, 19 2009 @ 09:03 AM
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nothing to do with military weaponry.

this is a conspiracy forum not a self help section. please try again...somewhere else



posted on Oct, 19 2009 @ 09:19 AM
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reply to post by _damon
 

Before you do anything get " The Book of Five Rings" by Musashi. Check out the local martial arts groups in your area and see if there are any Kendo classes. Just go to a class and check it out, they usually have them at the local university recreation center.



posted on Oct, 19 2009 @ 09:52 AM
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For something so intricate as learning the art of Swords no book is going to be adequate for learning it to a high enough mastery.

I'd suggest looking for classes for either Kendo, Bushido or Akido. All of which handle sword fighting and sword fighting techniques to some degree plus will also give you the added structure of disapline with your new found skills.



posted on Oct, 19 2009 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by _damon
 


read the book of five rings(Go Rin No Sho) as a philosophical guide to the art of the sword.
There is nothing like actual instruction though.
I taught myself the five rings style, after reading the book many many times and watching japanese soap operas about myamoto musahi's life.
But the five rings is about how to cut the opponent, and proper cutting is the very basis of learning the sword.
That being said, the five rings philosophy cannot be adapted to playing with a sword. It doesnt work if you dont strive to actually cut the enemy.
There can be no checking your swing or not following through in the five rings philosophy.
, because you dont cut the opponent.

For structured instruction find a kendo club. but it is sport fencing, not sword fighting.
Mushashi codified his style and it is known as Niten-ryū.

The most important things learn are the grip, the stance and footwork.
Oh and arms inside elbows close, arms stuck out get chopped off.



posted on Oct, 20 2009 @ 08:06 AM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


Thanks. I will get the book of five rings. About training in a dojo, i can't coz its out of range. You may find it childish but i wont explain myself about this. I will probably master the techniques way slower than in a dojo, fine with me i got a lot of free time to practise.

What i would like to get are books with all kendo techniques/katas, im sure there must be some best sellers. Any ideas? do you recommend me a certain author?



posted on Oct, 20 2009 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by _damon
 


Be very careful learning the Way of the Sword by yourself. Its best to have a mentor or instructor. You can end up cutting yourself. Or do the techniques incorrectly that may cause unwanted harm.

Do what other posters have said. Seek your local martial arts school. But make sure they are a fluid martial arts, not rigid.

By fluid, I mean an adaptive martial art that keeps up with modern techniques.



posted on Oct, 20 2009 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by guppy
 


Nobody starts with a a real sword, always start with wood,
and dont start with a kendo shinai, it is very different in size and feel from a real katana, unless you are going to take up kendo.

The greatest swordsman ever gave up steel in combat and used only wooden sticks.



posted on Oct, 20 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by _damon
 


You also have to decide whether you want to learn sport fencing(kendo),
a codified practice system, the techniques taught in most marshal arts, or you want to real sword combat.
And like I said the five rings method is about real combat, and it makes it very hard to spar with other people, because you HAVE TO CUT THE ENEMY.



posted on Oct, 20 2009 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


I usually train with a bokken. I train with a real katana (paul chen) but only to get stronger arms and better speed, simple moves. A sword is a tool to cut, harm, kill, imo. I usually visualize opponent when i train so i put strenght in my moves to cut and not only "move a piece of metal".

What i want to learn for now? Using a sword, parry, moves, katas, get a stronger body by practising and more speed. So any books that could help me PLZ?



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 04:24 AM
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You're not going to learn how to use a sword from a book. Like many others have sad, find a dojo and someone that can teach you how to use one.

The same goes for pretty much any weapon.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 03:18 PM
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Originally posted by _damon
reply to post by punkinworks
 


I usually train with a bokken. I train with a real katana (paul chen) but only to get stronger arms and better speed, simple moves. A sword is a tool to cut, harm, kill, imo. I usually visualize opponent when i train so i put strenght in my moves to cut and not only "move a piece of metal".

What i want to learn for now? Using a sword, parry, moves, katas, get a stronger body by practising and more speed. So any books that could help me PLZ?



hi, _damon,

You should U2U member, "Hanslune", he has formal training in Niten-ryū, he might be of some assistance.


One thing that I found, for myself anyway, that since I was really interested in combat training, doing the forms of the newer styles was kinda boring for me.
And since its a deadly game to full speed spar, even with a bokken, it made it very difficult to adequately practice, if you are truely trying to cut there is not way to check your swing.
So I gave it up, and put all my attention to my racing.



When I was 11 I was out thrashing around on my bmx bike during summer break, and I happened upon fencing store that was closing down and bought a foil with a russian grip for $10.
I had no idea at the time it was a lefty grip but it was all good.
I played with the thing a little but it sat it my closet for 25 years, then a fencing school opened and I joined.
I was lucky that the instructor was a former world champion and olympic medalist, (saber and foil) from hungary.
Of the three weapons, foil saber and eppee, the eppee is by far my favorite.
You cant get any closer to real dueling than with the eppee.
Its not as rigid as the foil or saber, weapons that have target zones and right of ways.
In eppee the whole body is a valid target not just the front of the torso and the mask as in foil, or the upper body in saber.
And in those weapons there is a "right of way", when a combatant makes an offensive move first, the opponent is obligated to defend firts, then counter attack , even if you can beat them to the touch on a counter attack. It was very counter to " The Way", and it was frustrating.

The eppee on the other hand, is a modern adaptaion of a dueling weapon, and the whole body is a target, from the tip of the toe or finger all the way up and around.
And there is no right of way, its just like dueling.

anyway U2U hanslune



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by Doc Tesla
 


If I remember correctly wasn't the sword always a military weapon (or a weapon of war if my wording is incorrect)? I'm pretty sure that a sword counts as a military weapon / Weapon of war.

[edit on 21-10-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Oct, 25 2009 @ 07:08 AM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


Thanks. I u2u but no answer yet. I found this, a set of video but dont know anything about the master.

LINK

What do you think?



posted on Oct, 26 2009 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


Well of course you use a practice sword when learning. But when learning sword movements, you may cause long-term damage if done incorrectly. Or you may find yourself doing the form not quite right.

Plus, its best to have a teacher who knows what to do to critique your form. There's a lot of things you can be doing wrong without an actual teacher to see. All martial art forms have a purchase. Foot, leg, arm, and hand placement can be critical with each placement meant for a specific purpose in combat.



posted on Nov, 2 2009 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


No answer. Anyway what u think of these videos?



posted on Nov, 4 2009 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by _damon
 


I agree with most posters saying you really need to go to a Dojo, learning to use a katana is not as easy as it looks. You could do yourself some serious damage if not used properly.
Are you a student or an adult? If you're a student, you could attend a class during your school/college breaks and practice what you've learnt.
Also you've mentioned speed a few times, using a katana fast requires skill and accuracy, which can only be learnt from practicing slowly and learning how to control the balance and grip before trying to break any speed records.
Is your katana a practice sword? If it's a display sword the blade can shatter or even come loose from its Tsuka (hilt), a professional katana used incorrectly can also be easily damaged.

So as not sound to negative, you could try watching basic Iaido and trying to learn some control before finding a class.




[edit on 4-11-2009 by Kurokage]



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 02:56 AM
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This is the weapon you want to train with. Its unsharpened and very heavy. It will work every muscle you have.
www.starfireswords.com...



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