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Should Morbidly Obese Kids Be Taken from Their Parents?

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posted on Oct, 20 2009 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


Then why is America more over weight than every other country? Are you meaning to tell me that we're the only place where this predisposition is found? If so elaborate on your thesis of how Americans can be so over weight (at about the rate of 61% of adults), when the rest of the worlds highest obesity rate only hites 50% of adults(this is only in Russia)? So clearly there is a trend in America that seems to be "spreading" to other countries. Sorry it's no disease, but be my guest thats the easiest way out.

[edit on 20-10-2009 by NoJoker13]




posted on Oct, 20 2009 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by L.HAMILTON
Used to be if you wanted to eat healthy, it was one of the cheapest grocery bill buying nothing but vegetables and food that is good for you. Now the tables are reversed, if you want to go on a diet it will cost twice as much as it used to. In today's economy people have no choice but to feed their families the cheaper more fattening foods. No, if we are looking at who to blame, I would say the FDA, allowing food Co. to add more fat and non healthy ingredients to their food products.


That is simply not true. If you want to go on a diet, simply buy less processed foods.

I have 3 kids (4 in about a week) with a single income and we eat stable and healthy meals on between $125-$175/month. If both parents work, you may not hit all the sales, but the key is moderation.

Buy the materials rather than the hyper-processed stick-in-the-oven lasagna. It's cheaper and much better for you. If you have time on Saturday to make tomato sauce for the week, do that.

Perhaps start your own garden. Because we live in a land of easy credit, which means consumption in a demanding infantile way to define us as people, and have been inundated with "let us do all the work for you" services and products doesn't mean that is our only options.

I suppose it's a tad late to suggest ingenuity and private enterprise.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by KrazyJethro
 


I understand what you're saying. However, you did find your way to this website in a search for knowledge so it's only predictable that you would research all you can to further improve your health. Not everyone has that drive. You're in the minority.

Considering the amount of nutritional/health information in bookstores and on the net, how does one make a final choice as to what's the healthiest advice?

Even nutritionists and dietitians have a huge misunderstanding of biochemistry and nutrient biology. Who do you believe if you're venturing into the confusing world of nutrition science for the first time?

-Dev



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 12:33 AM
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Originally posted by NoJoker13
reply to post by DevolutionEvolvd
 


Then why is America more over weight than every other country?


Because of our Dietary Habits.


Are you meaning to tell me that we're the only place where this predisposition is found?


I neither sad that nor implied that. So, no, this can occur in any individual barring those of whom have genetic predispositions that would otherwise override the other.


If so elaborate on your thesis of how Americans can be so over weight (at about the rate of 61% of adults), when the rest of the worlds highest obesity rate only hites 50% of adults(this is only in Russia)? So clearly there is a trend in America that seems to be "spreading" to other countries. Sorry it's no disease, but be my guest thats the easiest way out.


It's been very well established through epidemiological data that the "western diet," or the westernization of other country's diets, is responsible for most of the diseases of civilization, including Obesity.

Wanna guess what the main difference is between the "western diet" and all others is?

-Dev



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 01:14 AM
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I would call a parent with a very morbidly obese child mentally unstable but not neglectful. You obviously aren't neglecting your kid if they are getting that much food. I have no problem with these kids getting taken from their parents.

Kids get taken away from being starved, why not if they are being fed to death.

It disgusts me how being obese is almost a norm now in America. Get your # together people.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 02:16 AM
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reply to post by rollerboogie
 


Obesity is NOT caused by overeating. It's not that simple. Fat cells are not dump trucks. Extra calories don't just get shoved into them.

-Dev



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 02:21 AM
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well i read alot of post and i wish i could get that cheap with food a month its cheaper ware i live to buy the prepackaged stuff then it is stuff to make something bu scratch



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by DevolutionEvolvd
reply to post by KrazyJethro
 


I understand what you're saying. However, you did find your way to this website in a search for knowledge so it's only predictable that you would research all you can to further improve your health. Not everyone has that drive. You're in the minority.


True, I think many of us are. However, objectively, are those who do not seek knowledge to improve their lives necessary to the future of the species?

It used to be that people with diabetes or other ailments (AIDS) died. These days we keep them alive in relative perpetuity, enabling them to reproduce and multiply the disease. While I would never suggest we devolve health care to allow them to die or anything associated with it, it does have parallels in many debates as to the root of some of our issues.


Considering the amount of nutritional/health information in bookstores and on the net, how does one make a final choice as to what's the healthiest advice?


You could research how to research. Personally, I started with studying biology and botany (although I have a long way to go). Then you can easily parse through the abundance of garbage health info we have.


Even nutritionists and dietitians have a huge misunderstanding of biochemistry and nutrient biology. Who do you believe if you're venturing into the confusing world of nutrition science for the first time?

-Dev


The best approach (not trying to teach you) to me would be to believe no one.

I agree that the American health industry has no more interest in you staying healthy than the banks have in you actually paying off your debt. It's perpetual industry.

That is a far more complex issue than how stupid many of the nutrition information out there these days is.



posted on Oct, 21 2009 @ 09:56 AM
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Originally posted by xenchan`
well i read alot of post and i wish i could get that cheap with food a month its cheaper ware i live to buy the prepackaged stuff then it is stuff to make something bu scratch


It's only cheaper if you completely disregard the nutritional information. Of course Top Ramen is cheap, but it's also practically nothing but starch, MSG, and sodium. Pretty much ok for young people to eat sometimes, but a disaster for most.

The more processed a food is, the worse it is for you. Also, you must not be looking too hard.

Trader Joes is awesome.



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 05:36 AM
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reply to post by KrazyJethro
 


I can't disagree with you, Jethro. However, the percentage of the population that just won't/can't research this field is staggeringly high.

In any case, shouldn't we be able to trust the professionals that offer advice without worry so that we don't have to focus so much of our time on such an important, yet complicated subject?

-Dev



posted on Oct, 22 2009 @ 05:42 AM
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reply to post by NoJoker13
 


The predisposition I'm speaking of is outlined in this recent abstract:

Nutritional programming of the metabolic syndrome


The primary markers of the metabolic syndrome are central obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension. In this review, we consider the effect of changes in maternal nutrition during critical windows in fetal development on an individual's subsequent predisposition to the metabolic syndrome. The fetal origins of obesity, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance have been investigated in a wide range of epidemiological and animal studies; these investigations highlight adaptations made by the nutritionally manipulated fetus that aim to maintain energy homeostasis to ensure survival. One consequence of such developmental plasticity may be a long term re-setting of cellular energy homeostasis, most probably via epigenetic modification of genes involved in a number of key regulatory pathways. For example, reduced maternal–fetal nutrition during early gestation to midgestation affects adipose tissue development and adiposity of the fetus by setting an increased number of adipocyte precursor cells. Importantly, clinically relevant adaptations to nutritional challenges in utero may only manifest as primary components of the metabolic syndrome if followed by a period of accelerated growth early in the postnatal period and/or if offspring become obese.


In other words: Maternal Malnutrition during fetal development may affect an the child's predisposition to Metabolic Syndrome.

-Dev



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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This applies, I think.



www.timesonline.co.uk...

Two children considered to be at risk of abuse because they are severely obese have been removed from the protection register after scientists discovered that they carry a newly identified genetic abnormality that explains their weight.

Evidence from a ground-breaking study has convinced social workers that the children’s obesity was not caused by parental neglect or deliberate overfeeding but by a missing segment of DNA. The cases of another two children on the at-risk register have also been placed under review, after research showed them to have the same genetic deletion.


There have been several similar stories in the news lately, and I think it's very important we take a step back and ask ourselves very seriously if the state should have this much power. It's a scary, scary thing.



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