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BBC defends Humpty Dumpty decision

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posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 05:51 AM
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BBC defends Humpty Dumpty decision


uk.news.yahoo.com

The BBC has defended a decision to change the ending of nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty.

A version used on the CBeebies channel was altered so rather than "couldn't put Humpty together again" all the King's horses "made Humpty happy again".
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 05:51 AM
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I just thought I'd chip in an example of the 'political correctness gawn mad!' genre. Often these things are dismissed as apocryphal or scaremongering, but they do happen.

What I find interesting is the pitifully desperate way that the BBC have tried to spin this. The reasoning they've given for changing the ending of the Humpty Dumpty rhyme - which is, as everyone knows, "couldn't put Humpty together again" - due to, wait for it, the sake of 'creativity'. Personally, I think the excuse is farcical. If the BBC wanted to be creative why not actually come up with a new rhyme of their own? I mean, it's traditionally only sang as a single verse it's hardly a Anglo-Saxon epic.

Of course these kinds of rhyme have always been changed, particularly by 'sensitive' Victorians and Edwards who also put an end to a lot of the folklore tradition in much the same sanitising way, but given the BBC's desperation to provide racy and popularist television - how many people are killed off on 'family' shows like East Enders? - it seems a nonsense.

Humpty's appearance in 'Through the Looking Glass' is brought to mind too, given that his dialogue with Alice has a focus on changing usage and meaning, often for no real purpose. I very much doubt the people behind this change are actually aware of this though.

uk.news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:02 AM
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It goes far deeper than political correctness. The real message they're trying to change is that 'all the kings horses and all the kings men" (read government) was powerless. Think about the implications of that...



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:05 AM
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OMG, this is a complete joke yes?

Political correctness going way over the top.

This is what our Licence Fee pays for, cuckoo idiots making decisions like this.

Completely digusting.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:07 AM
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Well I am glad Humpty Dumpty is happy now, but the yolks on us



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:11 AM
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reply to post by whatukno
 


Lmao thanks for that you just made my day!

Star for you !!!



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:12 AM
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I couldn't care less if the BBC changed it. As long as there not telling people to change it. Then again what do you expect from the BBC.

Tsom87



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:17 AM
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You could not make this stuff up !!!!!!!!!!!

But after reading 1984.....it seems that the BBC are slowly turning into the Ministry of Truth - who's job it is to tell lies, alter the truth in the name of Political Correctness (code word for social / mind control) remove it from any historical records so that new generatons live in a "new" reality - created upon their twisted agenda.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:21 AM
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It all sounds rather silly but that simple rhyme conveys an important lesson to children in its original form and that lesson is lost with the change. If you smash an egg then no amount of power in the world is going to put that egg back together, once it is smashed it stays smashed. That rhyme is supposed to teach children that sometimes things just can't be fixed, that once they are broken they stay broken and that is a lesson that small children need to learn.

It is also rather sad that the BBC, with their all-encompassing politically-correct soppy-mindedness have either failed to understand this very simple rhyme and the lesson that it conveys or don't believe that children need to learn such things and will all grow up in a fluffy-bunny world where nothing ever goes wrong.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:26 AM
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4 & 20 blackbirds baked in a pie......

1 steroid fed battery farmed chicken.


Then the thought of jamie oliver's chicken show popped in my head.

Here's how they make pies, kids.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:34 AM
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What a poor show by the Beeb.
But then again, for me the sad reality is I am not surprised.. So do we really expect differently from them!



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:46 AM
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Originally posted by mythatsabigprobe
It goes far deeper than political correctness. The real message they're trying to change is that 'all the kings horses and all the kings men" (read government) was powerless. Think about the implications of that...


I honestly don't think it was weighted as that. I genuinely believe that this was a misguided and warped decision made within the children's department rather than anything that's actually come from above.

I also disagree with the idea that "all the King's horses and all the King's men" is signifying 'government', if only because it's generally only outside of the UK that people tend to think in those terms. People over here are generally very conscious of the fact that, despite the conspiracies about our Lizard Queen owning half the globe and the leaders of the world dance to her tune, that the monarchy and the government are pretty much different entities.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:52 AM
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I believe as warped as some here in the US to trying to block Romeo and Juliet because it perpetuates the supposed myth about only heterosexual lifestyles.

No, our world is so fracking stupid, it boggles the mind.





edit to add supposed before myth

[edit on 10/18/2009 by endisnighe]



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:54 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


What was Humpty doing on the wall in the first place?

Shouldn't he have been doing productive labour for the state?

S&F just because I don't want to offend. . . . Being PC and all, don't want you to sue.




posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:55 AM
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That simple little nursery rhyme was one of those that had a huge permanent effect on me in a very literal sense. I was always paranoid any and every time I had an occasion to find myself perched on top of a wall. I thought of ol' Humpty Dumpty every time -- and still do.

Nursery Rhymes can have a powerful and long lasting influence on a child's mind. The BBC has rendered this one into pointless fluff.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:57 AM
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Originally posted by skjalddis
It all sounds rather silly but that simple rhyme conveys an important lesson to children in its original form and that lesson is lost with the change. If you smash an egg then no amount of power in the world is going to put that egg back together, once it is smashed it stays smashed. That rhyme is supposed to teach children that sometimes things just can't be fixed, that once they are broken they stay broken and that is a lesson that small children need to learn.

It is also rather sad that the BBC, with their all-encompassing politically-correct soppy-mindedness have either failed to understand this very simple rhyme and the lesson that it conveys or don't believe that children need to learn such things and will all grow up in a fluffy-bunny world where nothing ever goes wrong.


I've got a good Puffin book of Nursery Rhymes from the very early 1960s which has about ten variations of the rhyme, most of them British regional variations as well as an American one and a German language one. I don't know how old the American one is but that's the one that seems at odds with the others and refers to Humpty tearing his gown rather than having his body broken.

What all the rhymes do have in common though is exactly what you point out, that 'lesson' that there's a finality the situation. Once it's broke, it's broke.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 06:59 AM
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Lets not overreact. This is claerly a needless bit of pandering to any kind of fear the BBC has of hurting the kids senseitivites. The BBC is a public body and is funded by us, therefore they are constantly afraid of upseting the people (us) who pay their wages.

Clearly this is overkill, but it may be a reaction to the last year or so with the Jonathan Ross incident and more recently the stuff with Strictly Come Dancing. I for one would like to see the BBC (TV) to become a bit bolder and defend itself a bit more against cricticism.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 07:01 AM
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Humpty Dumpty may not have been an egg but a cannon.

Humpty Dumpty

It's amazing what you can learn on ATS.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 07:07 AM
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Originally posted by mikerussellus
reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


What was Humpty doing on the wall in the first place?

Shouldn't he have been doing productive labour for the state?


One of the supposed and now debunked theories as to what he was doing on a wall, was that Humpty referred to a cannon. If that was the case, then if the King was involved then it was probably to stop a parliament or state from existing in the first place.



S&F just because I don't want to offend. . . . Being PC and all, don't want you to sue.



I feel violated and you will hear from my lawyer.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 07:51 AM
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did he really fall or was he pushed ?




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