NASA photos show moon strike created plume

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posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 10:38 AM
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SMART-1 was about one metre across, and lightweight in comparison to other probes. Its launch mass was 367 kg or 809 pounds, of which 287 kg (633 lb) was non-propellant. SMART-1 impacted the Moon's surface as planned, on September 3, 2006 at 05:42:22 UTC, ending its mission. Moving at approximately 2,000 m/s (4,500 mph), SMART-1 created an impact visible with ground telescopes from Earth. It is hoped that not only will this provide some data simulating a meteor impact, but also that it might expose materials in the ground, like water ice, to spectroscopic analysis.


The impact images for smart 1 are here www.esa.int...


LCROSS was designed to watch as the launch vehicle's spent Centaur upper stage, with a nominal impact mass of 2,305 kg (5,081 lb), struck the crater Cabeus[3] near the south pole of the Moon.


The impact velocity was projected to be over 9,000 km/h (5,600 mph);[13] at the time of the event, impact was calculated as over 10,000 km/h (6,200 mph).[6]


The impact images for lcross are here www.nasa.gov...

centaur/lcross was heavier and travelling faster at impact and these are the only images they can come up with, it stinks.






[edit on 18-10-2009 by remymartin]




posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 10:40 AM
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That's not even close to a high res from this distance. It could've been 10 years ago. The camera in the probe was more than enough for the job. You can clearly see landscape features and the impact itself. If think you can do better feel free to start your own company or something. Some people can never be satisfied.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 10:50 AM
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Hi! Yes I am wondering how the hubble telescope can capture such elegant photographs, and we the tax paying public get fed the worst
unfocused garbage images regarding searious newsbreaking science. I am older so I can say liar, liar pants on fire!
I had a genius brother who tested out of an entire year at Purdue, then received two engineering degrees. I was told I would have to worry where my toliet paper came from. Ha! Well he now lives in the slums and has been jobless 6 years. These people who are smart think the rest of us are stupid, and they think they deserve a free lunch paid for by all of us at the tune of $79,000,000. The information paid for by the public should be 100% public domain. How are we to advance as a humanity with a few feeling so entitled to all the information? It is evil. Everyone is entitled to have toliet paper if you work for it.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 11:27 AM
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ATS should start to start a fund to raise money for that poor, poor, poor Nasa so they can buy newer and better cameras.
Make very, very sad commercials for that fund, as if they were a starving nation in Africa.
Just to agitate and provoke Nasa.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 02:10 PM
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Download the LCROSS Scientist photo that is found at the official NASA web site. Now zoom in on the photo that is on the table in front of Anythony Colaprete You may have to rotate the picture to the right. What looks like a symetrical structure is at center of impact site? I cross referenced that photo to the NASA TV Coverage of LCROSS Impact photos and it does look like the site. I am not sure how to upload the picture if anybody can help out it would be greatly appreciated. Any thoughts on what this could be?

www.nasa.gov
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 02:18 PM
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Those are marker in my opinion. There's an arrow and those squares are probably marking the spot of the impact for zoom / crop.




posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by RecentlyAwaken

Originally posted by PsykoOps
reply to post by Rikhart
 


I hope you're joking. Show me even one of those amateur photos. With scale thank you.
People don't seem to understand the magnitudes involved in here, they expect to have high resolution shots of every grain of dust.



OK, PsykoOps, here ya go: ncarboni2.home.att.net...

This guy took this photo with a Canon EOS-20D (unmodified), connected to his Meade LX200 GPS UHTC 10" Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope via his 2x Televue Powermate (a focal length doubler, similar to a teleconverter, which also serves to mate his camera to the 2" telescope eyepiece tube). Effective focal length was 5000mm f/20.

Now look at that photo and tell me why, if he can shoot that HI RES from the earth, with a digital camera and a telescope, why the crap can NASA not out do him when they have a $18.686 billion dollar budget this year alone!!?? And are approx. 237,000 miles closer to the dang thing!

Copy of NASA's FY2010 Budget release can be found here:
www.nasa.gov...

If you want to review their budgets for the last 5 yrs or go you can also go here: www.nasa.gov...

Tons and Tons of Mission Statements, Budget outlines and Mission details all for the wonderful sheeple to read. (Which I'm sure you won't).

Before you bash, me or another ATS member for KNOWING we're being lied to, or stating that our expectations of an approx. 20 billion dollar a year agency, THAT OUR TAXES PAY FOR by the way, were unrealistic, lets spend a few moments and check our facts, shall we?




Wow, that's a great pic, it even shows the true color of the moon. Things that make you go...HMMMMM.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by tc842senior
 






There you go.



posted on Oct, 18 2009 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by tc842senior
 


That is a very good catch
I am not sure what it is, but to my unproffesional eye it looks very strange. Almost artificial.



posted on Apr, 12 2010 @ 12:54 AM
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Did anyone notice the strange tracks near the lcross impact zone?

Picture here:





They are approx 10 kms long

[edit on 12-4-2010 by Havick007]



posted on Apr, 12 2010 @ 12:58 AM
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reply to post by PsykoOps
 


Although a marker does not cause a shadow on the lunar surface



posted on Apr, 12 2010 @ 01:19 AM
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Originally posted by PsykoOps
Those are marker in my opinion. There's an arrow and those squares are probably marking the spot of the impact for zoom / crop.




Interesting theory.

Have you been able to verify it?



posted on Apr, 12 2010 @ 02:46 AM
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I said it was an opinion, you'd need the original with the marker in high resolution to verify. My opinion is based on the fact that there's plenty of markings on the pics frame so it's not a final print. Also it looks exactly like the markings I'd make if it were me. Maybe someone can email the people in the photo and ask?



posted on Apr, 12 2010 @ 03:07 AM
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Originally posted by PsykoOps
Those are marker in my opinion. There's an arrow and those squares are probably marking the spot of the impact for zoom / crop.



I overlooked this one - doozy of an effort there! Amazing stuff - what the heck is it?! Looks like a structure to me!



posted on Apr, 12 2010 @ 03:41 AM
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i watched it live there was no ploom.



posted on Apr, 12 2010 @ 03:45 AM
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Link to AP article doesn't not exist, broken link!



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by LifENcircleS
So why is it that everything around it is white out? With all the technology that we have as individuals you would think the government would have better right? With that said why didn't they ask to borrow my amazing digital camera from a little known company Olympus and stick it on a telescope in someone's back yard that they made on their own so they could have given us a better photo?


YES of course they should have done that, YOU HAVE NOT GOT A CLUE like most that make comments like that!



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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Originally posted by Rikhart
reply to post by PsykoOps
 


I hope you are joking? Dude let me just tell you, I have seen amateur photos from someones backyard telescope with a digital camera that AT LEAST rival the photos from the sattelite SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED TO MAP OUT THE MOON, called clementine. Do you think this is normal? Photos taken by amateurs, FROM EARTH, are not much worse than NASA´S, FROM A MOON ORBITING SATTELITE? Can you see the distance difference there? So we should accept that maybe nasa equiped clementine with a worst camera than the one used by those amateurs?

ARE YOU OUT OF YOUR FREAKING MIND? This is complete and utter bull# they are feeding us, no other word for it!


Well lets see a link to these amatuer pictures then, as the Hubble can only resolve objects about 300ft across on the Moon lets see these magic pictures taken from Earth.

I WONT HOLD MY BREATH to be on the safe side



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:12 AM
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Originally posted by Rikhart
reply to post by PsykoOps
 


Sure, go ahead and check the third and fourth pictures @

thelivingmoon.com...

I hope you realise this proves nasas images are complete and utter BS.
The average earth to moon distance is 384,403 kilometres.

The clementine sattelite was orbiting at 1250 kms.

Now come back to me, and tell me thats the best they can do. WAKE UP!


WHY dont you shut up because can you say why this seems a lot better than you claim.



Thats from the Clementine browser!!!!





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