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FBI building system that blows away fingerprinting

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posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 05:05 PM
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*sigh*


They are SO relentless!


The FBI is now on a fast track to build a "multi-modal biometrics" system that is designed to replace the current IAFIS (Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System) database that will vastly improve their abilities to enslave us even more.


news.idg.no...


*sigh*




posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by Historical-Mozart
 


Don't break the law and you have nothing to worry about. I see this as a good thing. The faster and more efficiently they can match finger prints from crime scenes the better off we all are.



posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 05:29 PM
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The technology is not even new, about time they replaced it with more sophisticated products, and then again its already behind the most recent technological breakthroughs.

Well its going to get worse, that's only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to technologies to maintain security, there are actually systems being developed that track your movement, facial expression, emotional state etc, and interprets this data on its own to file you as a suspected criminal or terrorist if you behave conspicuously.



posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by Aggie Man
 


The more complex a system is, the harder it is for the common person to decipher it.
The more elaborate, the more prone to abuse and mis-information.

The point is, they are going to catch, "who they want" regardless of guilt or innocence.

I hope they don't abuse the system, like I know they never have in the past.


[edit on 10/14/2009 by reticledc]



posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by Aggie Man
reply to post by Historical-Mozart
 


Don't break the law and you have nothing to worry about. I see this as a good thing. The faster and more efficiently they can match finger prints from crime scenes the better off we all are.



With all due respect to you Aggie Man, the attitude of "Don't break the law and you have nothing to worry about" is a big part of the problem that we have in America. There are 60 million "laws" on the books and it is almost impossible to not break some law somewhere some of the time as each of us goes about in our daily activities.


And the "laws" are color-of-law (Maritime/Admiralty), not Substantive Law (Organic Constitutional Law), so all these "laws" in the color-of-law system are impossible for anybody to keep track of and far too easy for the color-of-law authorities to use them to trip us up.


America has only 5% of the world's population, but 25% of the world's incarcerated population -- what does that tell you?



posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by Historical-Mozart
America has only 5% of the world's population, but 25% of the world's incarcerated population -- what does that tell you?


It tells me that it's a social issue, not a criminal one. You are right, we have too many laws on the books...because society demanded them. Not because our government is obsessed with imprisoning as many as possible.



posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by Aggie Man

It tells me that it's a social issue, not a criminal one. You are right, we have too many laws on the books...because society demanded them.



Yes, society did demand them, but it also was that the government and the media egged the society on by focusing and sensationalizing the "criminal" issues of drug issues and so on to the point which society -- not knowing a damn thing about this complex issue -- went for the Occam's razor solution, the simplest one, and that was to make tougher laws.


Oregon and Montana had decriminalized possession of small amounts of pot in the '70s and both states later re-criminalized such possessions... why? It was because the revenues from arresting/incarcerating people had dropped to abysmal levels, so the states, in need of revenue, re-criminalized pot. Crazy.


I really don't have any faith left in society in general. They've been unbelievably dumbed-down.




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