It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Fireball over Holland(w/ pic!)

page: 1
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 01:36 PM
link   

Fireballo ver Holland(w/ pic!)


www.nos.nl


In the Netherlands people leave a "fireball" or meteor from the sky would have fallen. Some people heard and explosion and saw flashes. On Twitter runs throughout the country to storm reports on the phenomenon.

The air of Schiphol has messages from people saying anything they have seen and the coastguard and police calls rains. Especially between 19.00 and 19.30 hours arrived at the Coast Guard calls from across the country.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.astroforum.nl
i37.tinypic.com
www.geenstijl.nl
www.nu.nl


www.nu.nl...
[edit on 13-10-2009 by cappuccino]

[edit on 13-10-2009 by cappuccino]




posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 01:36 PM
link   
Crappy google translate...

The story is the following: around 19:00h local time a lot of people saw a large fireball over holland and heared loud bangs and even felt rumbling. Imagine how close it must have been. And it was not even dark yet. The dutch shockblog Geenstijl.nl is the first one to report about this, but now offical news sources report it too.

The unfortunate thing is: Holland is not that big. I missed it.

Geenstijl.nl has a really cool pic posted by a guy on twitter.

www.nos.nl
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 13-10-2009 by cappuccino]

[edit on 13-10-2009 by cappuccino]



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 01:39 PM
link   
Update: Also in belgium they saw the fireball... www.urania.be...



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 01:46 PM
link   
According to a totally UNreliable source (fok.nl) the meteor crashed in sea and might have caused a tsunami. I think this is total BS, a bad joke.

I am a bit jealous that I didn't see it. It looks beautiful and very bright.




posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 01:59 PM
link   
I saw that once when I was kid. Never forget it, a huge ball of fire goin thru the sky still light out too. Looked pretty similar to that one, and was headed toward the ocean as well...dunno where it landed, but never heard a thing about it.



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 02:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by liquidsmoke206
I saw that once when I was kid. Never forget it, a huge ball of fire goin thru the sky still light out too. Looked pretty similar to that one, and was headed toward the ocean as well...dunno where it landed, but never heard a thing about it.


But now we have Twitter. Best news invention since homing pigeons. people were reporting about it as it flew over. Search for #vuurbal on twitter....



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 02:20 PM
link   
reply to post by cappuccino
 


yeah the internet rules....don't ever vote for anyone who would try and censor it....if only they had it when I was a kid. I bet every 9 year old has a camera on him these days too...I coulda got a killer picture of it. Oh well. Maybe next time.



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 02:31 PM
link   
A similar event ocurred over Ontario, Canada on 25 September. More details here: Space Weather dot com

Meterorites are possible for anyone in the area to look for.

WG3

[edit on 13-10-2009 by waveguide3]



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 02:32 PM
link   


No sound with that one.
Possible Foo (see 1943 sigthings in Germany, from feu French
for fire similar in language to fuego in Spanish)?

UFOs do not make noise so ether they backfire now
or a comet went across the sky.



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 02:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by cappuccino
Update: Also in belgium they saw the fireball... www.urania.be...

The article just below the one of today on the Urania website is almost identical to this one, it refers to similar sightings on august 15: both mention a bright fireball, green in color with an orange tail. Only difference is its brightness: magnitude -8 today versus magnitude -5 in august.
Urania is a public belgian observatory, by the way.

Anyway, it's a pity I missed it...



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 02:53 PM
link   
satellite decaying from orbit?

I know Iridium's satellites are dropping like flies and is part of the reason they went tits up.



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 03:35 PM
link   
It was LCROSS returning home after missing the moon! Just kidding. Nice find and excellent pic



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 07:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by cappuccino
around 19:00h local time a lot of people saw a large fireball over holland and heared loud bangs and even felt rumbling. Imagine how close it must have been.


Probably no closer than 30-50 km.

Even "larger" fireballs, up to around the size of a house (this one was probably not quite that big) for an asteroid of average density, are rapidly slowed down when they hit the lower and much denser layers of atmosphere. Usually they just explode, showering the ground (or water) below with meteorites, which is likely what happened here.

In many cases, it is the surviving fragments of just such an event that penetrate the lower atmosphere, where sound waves can propagate, that cause the booms, rumbling and shaking that people experience. Although they are no longer traveling fast enough to cause the emission of light that makes meteors appear to be luminous, they may still be going fast enough to break the sound barrier and create sonic booms. Only in extreme cases, would an object be large and dense enough to penetrate our lower atmosphere, and cause damage via an impact or tsunami.

Asteroids of the size of the Holland event probably hit us upwards of 30 times a year (we are still trying to figure out exactly how much), but most of them occur over sea or wilderness where there is no one to see or hear anything for hundreds of miles around.



6. Can a fireball create a sound? Will the sound occur right away, as you watch the fireball, or is their some delay?

There are two reported types of sounds generated by very bright fireballs, both of which are quite rare. These are sonic booms, and electrophonic sounds.

If a very bright fireball, usually greater than magnitude -8, penetrates to the stratosphere, below an altitude of about 50 km (30 miles), and explodes as a bolide, there is a chance that sonic booms may be heard on the ground below. This is more likely if the bolide occurs at an altitude angle of about 45 degrees or so for the observer, and is less likely if the bolide occurs overhead (although still possible) or near the horizon. Because sound travels quite slowly, at only about 20 km per minute, it will generally be 1.5 to 4 minutes after the visual explosion before any sonic boom can be heard. Observers who witness such spectacular events are encouraged to listen for a full 5 minutes after the fireball for potential sonic booms.


Source: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Fireballs and Meteorite Dropping Fireballs - The American Meteor Society



Update: Also in belgium they saw the fireball...


It's not surprising since meteors first start to become visible at about 100km altitude, so if it's dark enough, a bright fireball can easily be visible for many hundreds of miles, and over half a continent.



No sound with that one.
Possible Foo (see 1943 sigthings in Germany, from feu French
for fire similar in language to fuego in Spanish)?

UFOs do not make noise so ether they backfire now


Actually that one did produce sonic booms, and it shook houses too, not to mention dropping meteorite fragments that were later recovered. Here is the thread:

UFO - meteor like object with sonic boom above Dallas and Austin Texas!


Not all meteors, make sound though! In fact the vast majority of fireballs don't make any sound. I've seen fireballs as bright as the full moon (and even a few times brighter), that have not made a sound. Many of these brighter fireballs were members of well known cometary meteor showers, with the occasional bright sporadic fireball from an unknown source, although I have not seen one that comes close to the brightness of some of cometary meteors I have seen.

I have yet to see any "foo fighters" or "orbs" for that matter in over a decade of observing meteors.


or a comet went across the sky.


Some bright fireballs are caused by cometary fragments and dust (that is how we get meteor showers). What was thought to have been a large cometary fragment exploded over Tunguska in 1908 flattening 2,150 square kilometres of forest.

Even small comets are huge, and would likely be spotted before hand. It would likely be extremely bright in the night sky if it got close enough to "buzz" earth at the speed that is apparent in that clip.

Comets do not look like that! It's classic footage of a daylight meteor, that as I said above dropped meteorites that were recovered, and found to be asteroidal in origin.

Comets are made of much less dense material than asteroids, which is one of the main reasons why none has ever been recovered from a cometary fireball - it simply vaporises in a bright flash due to the high relative velocity with our atmosphere (upwards of 25 km/s or 67,000 mph at the lower end of the scale) in many cases.


The article just below the one of today on the Urania website is almost identical to this one, it refers to similar sightings on august 15: both mention a bright fireball, green in color with an orange tail. Only difference is its brightness: magnitude -8 today versus magnitude -5 in august.


And?

-8 is the brightness of a fairly thin crescent moon. These probably occur multiple times on a daily basis, most of them unseen and/or un-reported.

-5 is only 2.5x brighter than the brightness needed to qualify as a fireball. Hundreds of meteors of this magnitude bombard us every day, and many more during the busy times of year.

Spend a couple of nights out at this time of year, and you will probably see at least one fireball of at least -4 magnitude (about as bright as Venus gets).

The brightness of the Holland event was probably not much brighter than the full moon (around -12). In extreme cases very bright fireballs can exceed the brightness of the sun.

For comparison, this bolide photographed on the 21st of January 1999 by a European Fireball Network Camera located in the Czech Republic was around -18 magnitude (Source: METEOROBS)


Source: APOD


satellite decaying from orbit?


That's always a possibility in cases like this, but usually you can tell from the way the object breaks up in flight that it is man made, and the photograph looks more like a single object, than a stream of debris.

Usually someone would know that a satellite or large piece of junk was close to de-orbiting, and warnings would be issued beforehand, so it's not a likely possibility IMHO.



[edit on 13-10-2009 by C.H.U.D.]



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 07:31 PM
link   
To be honest, that looks like the reflection off of a shiny airplane. I can't quite make out which way the sun is pointing, but at just the right angle you could get that bright flash happening.

The other photos and videos look a little more convincing though, IMHO. And yeah, I doubt it's some sort of space junk de-orbiting. Unless of course it's something they didn't want us to know about.....


[edit on 13/10/09 by SkEpTiCiSM]



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 09:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by SkEpTiCiSM
To be honest, that looks like the reflection off of a shiny airplane. I can't quite make out which way the sun is pointing, but at just the right angle you could get that bright flash happening.


I can see why it might look a bit like that, but IMHO it's definitely not a reflection off a plane... look at the roundness of the head (the brightest part of the meteor). Then look at the tail... what part of the plane would the meteor's tail correspond to? It's not a lens-flare/spike, and it's certainly not motion blur since the the head would be equally blurred...

Here's the image blown up a bit:


I suppose it might resemble a sun dog like this one here, but to me it looks much like other photographs of daylight meteors I have come across.

A couple of examples:

Source: International Space Science Institute

Source: Spanish Fireball Network



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 11:07 PM
link   

Originally posted by SkEpTiCiSM
To be honest, that looks like the reflection off of a shiny airplane. I can't quite make out which way the sun is pointing, but at just the right angle you could get that bright flash happening.

[edit on 13/10/09 by SkEpTiCiSM]


To take away the question about the plane. The KNMI (Royal Dutch Meteoligical Institue) has readings with which they can confirm it was a meteorite that exploded into 3 pieces. The path was from northeast to southwest.

They ask people and companies with security camera's to send in their footage.

Source: www.nu.nl



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 11:15 PM
link   
when i read fireball i was picturing a firey ball in my mind. looks more like a glowing light though. :x



posted on Oct, 14 2009 @ 01:33 AM
link   
And some additional pics.... Pretty f***ing amazing!



posted on Oct, 15 2009 @ 02:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by platipus
when i read fireball i was picturing a firey ball in my mind. looks more like a glowing light though. :x



Actually platipus, you are not that far off the truth...

"Fireball" is just a term that could mean almost anything, and the same goes for the term "meteor":


A meteor is an atmospheric luminous phenomenon. It can then be the rainbow, a luminescent cloud, or a "shooting star".

Source: IMCCE

People often call meteors "fireballs" since they resemble glowing balls of light, and "fire" obviously is one of the ways in which light is produced.

The trouble is, that at the altitudes at which most meteors are luminous, there is little oxygen (comparatively to down here at sea-level), and certainly not enough to sustain combustion! Meteors actually produce light by a completely different mechanism, but one that most people are familiar with, even if they don't realize it.

When a meteoroid slams into our atmosphere at speeds ranging from 11-71 km/s, the kinetic energy from collisions with air molecules, causes both the air and the material that is stripped away from the meteoroid to form a glowing plasma. Effectively, it is not the meteoroid that is emitting light, but the air (or rather plasma) around it. This is one of the reasons we often see a tail.

Much the same process happens in fluorescent tubes, and the energy saving light bulbs we have today, the only difference being that electricity is the form of energy being used to drive the process, versus kinetic energy in the case of a meteor.

So there is no actual fire in a "fireball", but the term is still widely used. "Plasmaball" might be a better term in the case of meteors



posted on Oct, 15 2009 @ 04:45 PM
link   
Is it just me or is there any thinking we will see an influx
of low altitude high speed meteors in the near future.

These ships can turn on a dime and have great speeds
with great bright light as any star. The faster they go
the brighter they are so the shoe fits. Going slow in the
day is not an option. Night time fire lanterns going slow
as the wind can be done with the telltale static they can't
get ride of even in a hover at times.

I don't believe this meteor dis info cause a fire ship can
do the same and there is MORE of the ships than METEORS
flying around at low altitude.

Just another unsubstantiated phenomena like cattle autopsy's
and damaged crops in a circle with no answers.
No answers because of the insidious capture of technology.
No one dares to prove the cartels are wrong when you are up
against a wall of collusion.



new topics

top topics



 
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join