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Car companies and symbolism

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posted on Oct, 12 2009 @ 10:25 PM
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I was on youtube an came across this Video very Interesting specially the DODGE!!!



[edit on 12-10-2009 by 2kni3]

[edit on 12-10-2009 by 2kni3]




posted on Oct, 12 2009 @ 10:29 PM
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Your youtube link doesn't connect to the video.



posted on Oct, 12 2009 @ 10:31 PM
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Originally posted by daddyroo45
Your youtube link doesn't connect to the video.


there fixed it!!!



posted on Oct, 13 2009 @ 01:06 AM
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symbolism


This video points out the fact of symbolism, but doesn't seem to address any meaning. I recommend people do some basic reading on heraldry before getting up in arms about the fact that company logos are using symbols. For example, the video spends an entire minute from 1:20 to 2:20 pointing out various shields, but the Escutcheon, or "sheild" on a coat of arms is one of the most common and basic elements of traditional heraldry. The coat of arms itself is intended to announce identify. On a field of battle, it was useful to be able to identify the family of origin of soliders, and the shield has evolved into modern use. The fact of the shield itself should not be any cause for concern. Brandishing a coat of arms as an identifier is no more sinister than mounting your family name on your mailbox so people know it's yours.

It's what depicted by the heraldry that's significant.

For example, in the video, many shields are shown bearing animals, which are extremely common heraldric device. Lions are the most common, but horses, griffons, and dragons are also used a great deal.

Let's look at a couple from the video. For example, both the Stuttgard shield on the Porsche logo depicted at 2:00, as well as the Ferrari logo have horses on them. First, we notice that both horses are facing left. But that would be facing right when viewed from the perspective of the person bearing the shield. That orientation would be considered dexter and is generally indicative of a "positive" intent.

But what's the significance of the horse? Well, traditionally, the horse itself is associated with the idea of readiness for king and country. However, in this case, it happens that something unusual is going on. Let's focus on the Porsche logo for a moment. You'll notice that the horse is on a smaller shield contained within the greater shield of the Porsche logo. In heralrdry, this arrangement is known as an inescutcheon It may be used to indicate possession, or it may simply be a charge.

You'll also notice the word "Stuttgard" on the logo, and if we look it up we'll see that Stuttgard is the German city that Porsche's corporate headquarters is in.

And, if you look at the wiki page for Stuttgard, you'll see that the coat of arms of the city of Stuttgard is that same horse depicted in the Porsche logo.

There's nothing mysterious or sinister about this. And we find the origins described on the wiki page for Ferrari, which also bears a similar horse:



Content from external source:
The city's name derives from Stutengarten, an ancient form of the German word Gestüt, which translates into English as stud farm and into Italian as scuderia. Porsche also includes the Stuttgart sign in its corporate logo, centred in the emblem of the state of Württemberg. Stuttgart's Rössle has both rear legs firmly planted on the soil, like Baracca's horse, but unlike Ferrari's cavallino.


The Ferrari horse, while similar, has a slightly different story behind it:


Content from external source:
"On June 17, 1923, Enzo Ferrari won a race at the Savio track in Ravenna where he met the Countess Paolina, mother of Count Francesco Baracca, an ace of the Italian air force and national hero of World War I, who used to paint a horse on the side of his planes.

Ferrari chose to have the horse in black (as it had been painted as a sign of grief on Baracca's squadron planes after the pilot was killed in action) and he added a canary yellow background as this is the color of the city of Modena, his birthplace.


Quite a trail, but essentially this particular piece of heraldric symbolism is simply a nod to the histories of the companies involved.

Of course, there are other interpretations. There's much to heralrdic symbolism. For example, as one of the wiki quote above mentions, while both the Ferrari and Porsche logos share the Stuttgard horse, they have different heraldric attitude.

Specifically, the horse on the Porsche Stuttgard shield is depicted with both hind legs touching the ground, and the horses body is oriented at less than 45 degress. This position is known as salient suggesting that the horse is leaping.

Compare to the Ferrari horse, with only one foot on the ground, in the position known as rampant.

These different attitudes could be interpreted to imply, for example, that the horse on the Porsche logo is leaping forward, striving for excellence. While the Ferrari horse is slightly crazed and uncontrollable. Different attitudes to suggest different personalities for company and vehicle.

But not a conspiracy to take over the world.


[edit on 13-10-2009 by LordBucket]



posted on Nov, 28 2009 @ 09:12 PM
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I think this is proof that some people just have way too much time on their hands. Is there no intelligent conspiracies left to talk about?



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