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NASA "Moon Bombing" mission -- DISAPPEARS

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posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by LordBucket
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 




www.newscientist.com/article/dn17951-spacecraft-kamikaze-s mashes-into-moon.html


That's an interesting article you linked, Soylent. let me quote you a few lines from it:


"NASA puzzles over 'invisible' moon impact"

"immediately after the scheduled impact time, there was no obvious sign of the spectacular explosion that many were expecting."

"visual camera apparently did not detect the event"

"Several major observatories were also watching for signs of impact, including the Keck and Canada-France-Hawaii telescopes on Mauna Kea, neither of which saw a plume."

"I think we're all a little bit disappointed that we didn't see anything," David Morrison, director of NASA's Lunar Science Institute"


Yes, you are correct --

-- however it has been already established way back in this thread that the plume was a disappointment, and that many Earth-based telescopes that were expecting to see it did not.

(or am I missing some specific point of interest in those quotes that you posted?)

I don't understand why some people think that just because an experiment had unexpected results, that there must be something "fishy" going on. Scientists get unexpected results all the time. It's there job to deal with those results. The only difference here is that the "average person" had a front row seat to this experiment (while most of the time, the average citizen never cares to see an experiment.)


The interesting question that NASA scientists need to work out now is exactly why the plume was not high. That's what scientists do. It's not a conspiracy -- it's science.



[edit on 10/9/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]




posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by defcon5
Oh the other thing I found weird, was that when everyone was cheering after the impact, the guy in the front row turns around to high-five the guy behind him. The guy in the back gets up, rolls up his equipment, looks down at the guy in front, says something to him, ignores his hand, then walks out of the room like he is PO'ed about something. The guy in front puts his headphones back on, never having gotten his high-five returned.


[edit on 10/9/2009 by defcon5]


That's exactly why i'm saying this was staged... the guy was probably thinking to himself...

" we should be ashamed of ourselves for faking this, the world should really know what we're doing to our ET friends up there, i'm mad had as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore"

someone should find this man... and interview him, I be he'll spill the beans on NASA!!! FIND THIS MAN>>>



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by OneNationUnder
 


Come on, no one cares of what is going on on the moon or with NASA apart from some ATS users and some astronomers.
Ask how many people knew about this.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by butcherguy
Soylent Green, do you by chance do PR work at NASA? Seems like a possibility, looking at your posts.



... funny I was reading his posts here and thinking the exact same thing.

If this is not the case Soylent Green then perhaps you may want to check out that possibility. I have it on good authority that Nasa is could use some help in this area



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:00 PM
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Does anyone know how many jobs could have been created with the

money waisted on the moon missions.

Anyone know how many bridges could have been repaired (some before

collapsing)?

how many highways could have been built?

how many battery powered cars could have been made?

how many pot holes repaied?

how many people fed, clothed, housed and educated?

The moon is more important than the earth and the people on it.

How sad.

[edit on 9/10/09 by John Matrix]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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Which observatories saw the plume?

CNN) -- NASA said Friday's rocket and satellite strike on the moon was a success, kicking up enough dust for scientists to determine whether or not there is water on the moon.
An artist's rendering shows the LCROSS spacecraft, left, separating from its Centaur rocket.

An artist's rendering shows the LCROSS spacecraft, left, separating from its Centaur rocket.

"We have the data we need to actually address the questions we set out to address," said Anthony Colaprete, principal investigator for the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, mission.

It will be awhile before all the data from the satellite can be analyzed to determine if there is water on the moon, according to LCROSS project manager Dan Andrews.

Andrews said that "the spacecraft performed beautifully."

NASA crashed the rocket and a satellite into the moon's surface on Friday morning in a $79 million mission.

NASA televised live images of the LCROSS as it crashed into a crater near the moon's south pole.Video Watch as NASA reacts to "successful" crash »

Minutes before its impact, the satellite guided a rocket into the Cabeus crater in an effort to kick up enough dust to help the LCROSS find whether there is any water in the moon's soil.
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The Centaur upper-stage rocket impacted the moon shortly after 7:30 a.m. ET, and the satellite followed it four minutes later.

The LCROSS carried spectrometers, near-infrared cameras, a visible camera and a visible radiometer to help NASA scientists analyze the resulting plumes of dust -- more than 250 metric tons' worth -- for water vapor.

But immediate NASA images of the crash produced no sign of the plumes, which were expected to rise six kilometers from the moon's surface, said John Marmie, LCROSS deputy project manager.

"Everyone was like, 'What's happening here?' " Marmie said. "But that doesn't mean we don't have good data there."

Observatories on Earth did confirm they saw plumes after the crashes, Marmie said. Video Watch as a mission official explains the importance of finding water »

The orbiting Hubble Space Telescope and NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter photographed the impacts. Meanwhile, hundreds of telescopes on Earth focused on the moon, hoping to catch a glimpse of two plumes.

The Cabeus crater lies in permanent shadow, making observations inside the crater difficult.

NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, who watched at a public event at the Newseum in Washington, noted the great interest in the NASA mission.

"We had families ... literally coming in off the street" to watch, Garver said on NASA TV. iReport: Did you watch?

NASA had encouraged amateur astronomers to join the watch parties.

"We expect the debris plumes to be visible through midsized backyard telescopes -- 10 inches and larger," said Brian Day at NASA's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California, before the strike. Day is an amateur astronomer who is leading education and public outreach for the LCROSS mission.

Ames -- which led the mission -- hosted an all-night event featuring music and food before the broadcast of NASA's live transmission of the lunar impact.

Other science observatories and amateur astronomy clubs across the country hosted similar events. Video Watch CNN's Jeanne Moos ask if lunacy is behind the moon "bombing" »

"The initial explosions will probably be hidden behind crater walls, but the plumes will rise high enough above the crater's rim to be seen from Earth," Day said.
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Data from previous space missions have revealed trace amounts of water in lunar soil. The LCROSS mission seeks a definitive answer to the question of how much water is present. NASA has said it believes water on the moon could be a valuable resource in the agency's quest to explore the solar system.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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Heh, just had a funny thought. Maybe we didn't get a plume because it just impacted the shell of the death star
.

Damn alien ships masquerading as dusty balls of inert moon rock!



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by wakinup13
 


No -- I've been very active on ATS since 2006, and although my area of interest is space exploration (I'm a space exploration fan), by checking my post history you can see that my posts have been in many various topics (non-NASA topics).



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by JimOberg
 


Hmmm maybe the ET's enclosed the orbiter in a hyperspace bubble and sent it through the moon to the other side and destroyed it????



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:05 PM
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I'm telling you guys, think about it: this whole mission was most probably staged to TRANSPORT certain load to the moon, not blast it. The white capsule (which everyone presumed to be a bomb), in reality could have served as a vessel for something else.

The question is: WHAT WAS IN THAT WHITE CAPSULE?

If you think about it, it becomes much clearer, why nobody saw any 'plume'.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:07 PM
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Originally posted by John Matrix
Does anyone know how many jobs could have been created with the

money waisted on the moon missions.

[edit on 9/10/09 by John Matrix]


Jobs were created with this Moon mission. Who do you think built the rockets, refined the fuel, designed the mission, ect. ect. ect.

Boo Hoo Hoo




posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
reply to post by John_Q_Llama
 

In my opinion, it may be because the Moon isn't as scientifically interesting as Mars. One of NASA's missions is to look for the possibilities of life elsewhere, hence NASA's whole "Follow the Water" approach to Mars exploration -- the whole reason to "follow the water" is to look for life.

I don't think they see the Moon as being a good prospect for finding life. Not as good as Mars, and not as good as Saturn's moons Titan and Enceladus -- the other bodies being observed closely be NASA at the present time.

If NASA's quest to find life has a limited budget, they don't want to spend a whole lot of that budget on the Moon.


I agree that the Moon may not seem as interesting from a scientific perspective. Heck, it doesn't even look as interesting to a layperson such as myself! And I agree that there's most likely not going to be life on the Moon.

But let's set that aside for a moment. Consider how much money is spent on these missions. Billions of dollars which have come, in large part, from taxpayers. Now, I'm all for scientific research and I'd love to learn if there's life elsewhere in the Solar System. But why rush? Why not take advantage of the Moon more than they have so far? Testing rovers and rover technology in the extreme environments on Earth is only going to provide so much expertise. The Moon could provide excellent opportunities for technological refinements, gaining knowledge about how to deal with technical issues, and just getting a better understanding of what we're doing. Maybe we'd discover a breakthrough in testing methods, or realize that there's a much more reliable way to communicate with the rovers, and so on.

If there's life or water on Mars, it's not going anywhere (unless one of those craft we sent there winds up contaminating the environment). And if we do find some microbes, what exactly is that going to do for us? I'm not trying to put a damper on such a significant discovery, but the payoff in finding some microscopic organisms simply doesn't seem worthy compared to the value of what could be learned on the Moon. But that's just my opinion.


Now that the payload has been thrust into the surface of the Moon, all we have are some pictures and video to analyze. What if they had put a rover in the same area before the impact? It could be gathering the debris and doing a much more detailed, reliable, and redundant testing.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by unexplainedtruth
I think the ebe's stopped it before impact. The same way they disable our nukes.
It is bad enough we bomb our own planet, but they have bases on the moon..

"stop throwing your toys at us"


You see, this is why everone thinks we're ALL crazy on ATS. Some things, whether a possibility or not, you just don't say. That being said............................We all know it was a higly advanced Yeti race cross-bred with fallen angels and relocated to the moon 80,000 years ago.The lack of buildings still baffles me. There I said it!


[edit on 9-10-2009 by Phenomium]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:11 PM
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That was the WORST video I have ever seen, what did NASA do? Strap a Seven 11 security camera to a SCUD Rocket and blew a hole in the moon? We spent 79 million dollars on this project! They should have used some Hollywood cameras , or better yet used that money to stimulate the economy.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:17 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:17 PM
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Damn, next time they should use one of these 50 Megaton thermonuclear impactors. That would kick up some dirt.




By the way, does anyone remember NASA's DEEP IMPACT probe from 2005? This impactor was more dramatic:




The impact on the comet changed it's trajectory by a measurable amount. That means we now have the technology to "nudge" a comet or asteroid and hit the earth, say some unfriendly part of the earth.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:19 PM
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This mission was definately a bomb alright.

A total stinker.




posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by John_Q_Llama
...If there's life or water on Mars, it's not going anywhere (unless one of those craft we sent there winds up contaminating the environment). And if we do find some microbes, what exactly is that going to do for us? I'm not trying to put a damper on such a significant discovery, but the payoff in finding some microscopic organisms simply doesn't seem worthy compared to the value of what could be learned on the Moon. But that's just my opinion.


There is no "Payoff" per se. However, finding life on Mars totally independent of life on Earth would be very scientifically meaningful. If life arose TWICE independently on two planets in the same solar system, then that could mean that life is not only abundant, but downright common, in the universe. It could mean that life is potentially everywhere. That is the "payoff".

However, determining if that life really did form independently from life on earth may be easier said than done. Perhaps life on earth came from mars (in a "Mars meteorite" 3.8 Billion years ago)...

...Or, perhaps life was transported from Earth to Mars in the same way -- via a meteorite that originated on Earth...

...Or, perhaps our early solar system was full of comets that were already seeded with life (potentially peices of a larger comet), and those comets rained down on ALL of the forming planets and moons -- seeding them with life. In that case, life on Earth, Mars, Europa, Ganymede, Titan, and wherever else we may someday find life all came from one common ancestor.

Perhaps in that last model of life in our solar system, our potentially life-filled solar system is unique, and life elsewhere in the universe is still extremely rare.

Who knows?


[edit on 10/9/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by Phenomium
 


I suppose you're being sarcastic, because most people would know my screen name is from a classic science fiction movie from 1973 -- and if you don't, then I'm sorry, because my screen name also spoils that movie for you.

EDIT TO ADD: and my avatar follows the theme of my screen name.

[edit on 10/9/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Bacteria seems to able to survive in the vacuum of space. When the Apollo 12 crew brought back parts of the Surveyor 3 probe which landed 2 years earlier, they still found living bacteria on it.

link: en.wikipedia.org...

So bacteria may be everywhere in space, seeding the planets. Of course this raises the question of where did the bacteria originally come from or was it "designed" by somone and where did that someone come from etc etc



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