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NASA "Moon Bombing" mission -- DISAPPEARS

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posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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Originally posted by tyranny22
I don't know why everyone is so upset.

You've been taking this crap from NASA for over 40 years. Doctored moon photos. Ice particle anomalies. UFO codewords. They've practically served feces on a silver platter and people have gobbled it down and asked for seconds.

Don't worry - by this time tomorrow they'll have a full course meal ready for all of you. And I don't doubt that whatever they say, most people will eat it up like it's Thanksgiving dinner.

Desert anyone?


No truer words ever spoken!




posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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Oh the other thing I found weird, was that when everyone was cheering after the impact, the guy in the front row turns around to high-five the guy behind him. The guy in the back gets up, rolls up his equipment, looks down at the guy in front, says something to him, ignores his hand, then walks out of the room like he is PO'ed about something. The guy in front puts his headphones back on, never having gotten his high-five returned.

Anyway, I don't know what to make of this, and I am usually the guy who sticks up for NASA on this kind of stuff. Could all be nothing, but I do find those two things odd. Normally I find all of the moon anomaly stuff to be ridiculous, but I would like to know what it was I saw this morning.

[edit on 10/9/2009 by defcon5]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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Soylent Green, do you by chance do PR work at NASA? Seems like a possibility, looking at your posts.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:30 PM
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I just got this insane idea: WHAT IF THIS WAS A DELIVERY MISSION?

I mean, SOMETHING had to be delivered to the moon. They created this half-baked 'water ice search' legend to cover up for the shipment operation, which would have been tracked by observatories anyway. Some plausible excuse was needed.

No plume on the impact - because there was no impact: the load was delivered safely, securely and in one piece, and further transported.

End of story. We now cut to obama nobel speech.

[edit on 9-10-2009 by mysteralex]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by mysteralex
 




Have you even bothered to read mission parameters? The detonation plume (cloud of debris) was estimated to be 4 km high. A DUST CLOUD FOUR KILOMETERS HIGH.


Whoa...suddenly now it was only supposed to be four kilometes? yes, I've read the mission parameters, and I'm getting tired of linking them Here they are.

Please note the lcross.arc.nasa.gov URL of the source .ppt file.

The mission summary says, very clearly:

"LCROSS Shepherding S/C (S-S/C) accurately directs the 2000 kg EDUS into a permanently shadowed region at a lunar pole, creating a substantial cloud of ejecta (~60 km high, >200x the energy of Lunar Prospector) "

60 kilometers is 37 miles.

And yet, over the past few days I've been watching people report smaller and smaller numbers.

Where are you getting your 4 kilometer figure?



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:31 PM
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For me, against the predictions, this was very odd. It is rare that experiments of this type, with all the publicity around it, go quite so spectacularly pear shaped.

Lots of unanswered questions. Lot of unanswered questions being asked by big media organisations... fun ahead.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by Raider of Truth
reply to post by mnmcandiez
 


that's the thing mate... all the observatories have stated they saw nothing.. and even the mighty hubble didnt see anything.

this stinks big time!


Kitt Peak Observatory in New Mexico saw the impact flash, and their spectral analysis of the flash indicated the presence of sodium -- which is consistent with the spectrometer data from LCROSS.
www.newscientist.com...

The last I heard, Hubble had not yet downloaded the photos of the impact, but perhaps my news is old...can you find me a link to the story about Hubble?



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by defcon5
Oh the other thing I found weird, was that when everyone was cheering after the impact, the guy in the front row turns around to high-five the guy behind him. The guy in the back gets up, rolls up his equipment, looks down at the guy in front, says something to him, ignores his hand, then walks out of the room like he is PO'ed about something. The guy in front puts his headphones back on, never having gotten his high-five returned.

Anyway, I don't know what to make of this, and I am usually the guy who sticks up for NASA on this kind of stuff. Could all be nothing, but I do find those two things odd. Normally I find all of the moon anomaly stuff to be ridiculous, but I would like to know what it was I saw this morning.

[edit on 10/9/2009 by defcon5]


Very astute observation. Very, very astute. You can tell something was irking him. Then look at the two guys on the bottom of the screen. The guy in the black shirt says something to the guy in the red that just got dissed, like, "wtf is his problem?" and you can see a convo takes place. Then the guy in the black shirt looks back at man that is in a huff and eyes him. Very odd as you say.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by LordBucket
 

I've never heard anything about 4 km. I have consistently been hearing that it was supposed to be 10 km or 6 miles...

...except for that mission summary you linked that states 60km! That's way different than what I have been consistently hearing.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:37 PM
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I was not surprised. They need excuses to continue spending our money and as far as we know it was a sucess - The camereas might not have even looking in the right area!



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:38 PM
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...


NASA's gunpowder astronomy.


Major-General Sir Richard William Howard Vyse.

Anyone?

Gunpowder Archaeology.

en.wikipedia.org...


...
..
.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by defcon5
Oh the other thing I found weird, was that when everyone was cheering after the impact, the guy in the front row turns around to high-five the guy behind him. The guy in the back gets up, rolls up his equipment, looks down at the guy in front, says something to him, ignores his hand, then walks out of the room like he is PO'ed about something. The guy in front puts his headphones back on, never having gotten his high-five returned.

Anyway, I don't know what to make of this, and I am usually the guy who sticks up for NASA on this kind of stuff. Could all be nothing, but I do find those two things odd. Normally I find all of the moon anomaly stuff to be ridiculous, but I would like to know what it was I saw this morning.

[edit on 10/9/2009 by defcon5]


He was probably disappointed that the plume did not reach as high as expected. That was quite a let down for a lot of people who wanted to see the plume glistening in the sunlight.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:44 PM
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Something about this just doesn't sit right, and I'm not talking about the plume or the dust or any of that. What bothers me is that we've been sending rovers to Mars for a while now, but have they ever put one on the moon to do the same sort of work that Spirit and Opportunity have done on Mars? The moon would be the perfect place to not only gain invaluable experience with unmanned missions without having to wait months for the landing, a way to learn about the moon without putting lives at risk, as well as helping the scientists to develop more reliable machines for future use. I'd much rather see that then dropping a payload into the surface, which is just a one time thing with an extremely limited window in which to gather data.

[edit on 9-10-2009 by John_Q_Llama]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:45 PM
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Our President winning the Peace Prize and the NASA news at the same time is no coincidence folks. Why do you think he won at the very time of this moon mission?

It's a nice diversion. Conspiracy 101.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:49 PM
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Originally posted by HrdCorHillbilly
Someone posted this video in another thread. Check out the infrared images. There appears to be flashing in the dark red areas. Check the video around these two times 0:43 (top left) and 3:57 (top middle)



[edit on 9-10-2009 by HrdCorHillbilly]


I don't understand why they are clapping, as if something happened. This is success? It was more like 79,000,000 (79 million) dollars spent on less than a firecracker show. We are in a recession and this is progress? I have seen more action watching a tick suck blood on a dog's back. Wonder what 79 Mil could have done for people here on earth regarding housing and food and jobs..............screw health care anyway.....sick of hearing about it, who can afford anything at all let alone health care. I am just saying, they literally shot our country's money into a dirt hole and nothing happened but a "heat signature"...........where did that come from MAYBE AN EXPLODING ROCKET????? I hate NASA so much, they are right up there with the International Bankers.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 




www.newscientist.com/article/dn17951-spacecraft-kamikaze-s mashes-into-moon.html


That's an interesting article you linked, Soylent. let me quote you a few lines from it:


"NASA puzzles over 'invisible' moon impact"

"immediately after the scheduled impact time, there was no obvious sign of the spectacular explosion that many were expecting."

"visual camera apparently did not detect the event"

"Several major observatories were also watching for signs of impact, including the Keck and Canada-France-Hawaii telescopes on Mauna Kea, neither of which saw a plume."

"I think we're all a little bit disappointed that we didn't see anything," David Morrison, director of NASA's Lunar Science Institute"



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by John_Q_Llama
 

In my opinion, it may be because the Moon isn't as scientifically interesting as Mars. One of NASA's missions is to look for the possibilities of life elsewhere, hence NASA's whole "Follow the Water" approach to Mars exploration -- the whole reason to "follow the water" is to look for life.

I don't think they see the Moon as being a good prospect for finding life. Not as good as Mars, and not as good as Saturn's moons Titan and Enceladus -- the other bodies being observed closely be NASA at the present time.

If NASA's quest to find life has a limited budget, they don't want to spend a whole lot of that budget on the Moon.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:51 PM
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I think the ebe's stopped it before impact. The same way they disable our nukes.
It is bad enough we bomb our own planet, but they have bases on the moon..

"stop throwing your toys at us"



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by OneNationUnder
 




It's a nice diversion.


I've actually been wondering something similar. Because of this event, all major observatories, and probably most hobbyist astronomers with telesopes were looking at the location of this non-event.

What would they have seen if they had been looking elsewhere?



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


Very strange, I just re-watched and the body language was very tense to watch. The other guy in the dark shirt sitting next to the one who tried to high-five the guy packing up and leaving says something about it to the wanna-be high-fiver (assumption, but he's looks at him while he's talking supposedly talking about him) and watches him continue to pack up his stuff like he's interested in any additional actions he might make. The guy who tried to high-five then puts his hands over his head after throwing his clasped hands in front of him like he was trying to brush it off acting like he wasn't affected by it ("meh, no big deal").

The guy leaving does seem like he's a bit perturbed about something. He didn't have a smile on his face or any kind of look of feeling accomplished. I mean, I suppose he could have had an important engagement that he was in a hurry for but it only takes a second to high-five someone.

Purposefully not high-fiving someone is just as bad, IMO, as not shaking someone's hand. It's a statement and usually not a very good one.

It could have absolutely nothing to do with the mission though and only to do with the relationship between these co-workers. Who knows. Man! I really wish we knew what he said to that guy. Was it something like, "Shove that high-five up your yahoo"?


[edit on 9-10-2009 by nunya13]



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