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posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 05:47 PM
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After being amazed by marsorbust's EXCELLENT photo of the moon, I figured maybe the other folks here on ATS have some great shots.

Heres one I took. I don't have a telescope, so none of mine will be as fantastic as marsorbust's, but one day!

This is the milky way over my next door neighbor's house, taken in my backyard. The exposure time was a little over 3 minutes, so it was much darker outside than it looks. You can see clearly that the ISO was at 1600, haha! The aperture on this was probably around 3.5-4.5, I can't remember, and it was never recorded.





posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 08:31 PM
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Here's a couple of my latest images:
Jupiter, with Europa closest to Jove and then Io


And this one of M27 I'm particularly happy about since it's my first test of autoguiding, which allowed me to do a 2.5 and then even a 5 minute exposure, something that would have been downright impossible before. Up until now I've been limited to about 1 minute exposures, but with autoguiding the sky's the limit. I only stacked two exposures of the above lengths to make this image since it took me most of that night to work out the kinks in the autoguiding program's settings (which ironically is called "Push Here Dummy" and is supposed to be a foolproof one-touch program. Ha.) Future images will involve many, many more exposures and be far less noisy.


Both images were taken with an 8" LX200 Classic Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. For the first image I used a Meade LPI camera, the second image used a Canon XTi.

One more, just for fun. Clavius Crater 5 image mosaic. Taken with a B&W Meade Electronic Eyepiece:


[edit on 6-10-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 08:53 PM
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That picture of Jupiter is absolutely incredible. Congrats.

I used to have a Galileo telescope (no clue what it was anymore), which would be sooo useful now. But I went to college and it was large and heavy and took up space, so it went on ebay. Perhaps next summer i'll try and get a steal online or something.



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 09:04 PM
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Originally posted by Schmidt1989
That picture of Jupiter is absolutely incredible. Congrats.

I used to have a Galileo telescope (no clue what it was anymore), which would be sooo useful now. But I went to college and it was large and heavy and took up space, so it went on ebay. Perhaps next summer i'll try and get a steal online or something.

Thanks! I remember an old Galileo telescope we used to have at the public observatory I worked at. It was in tough shape though and the mount was infuriating. There are some great scopes out there, and one or two that can be had for relatively little. If you could snipe something like this at this price it'd be well worth it:
cgi.ebay.com...



posted on Oct, 8 2009 @ 06:11 AM
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Just took this last night, M27 again with about 35 minutes more light collected than before. I shot for about an hour until the battery on the camera died and then used the best 35 minutes of 5 minute exposures to add to the frames I shot before.

*edit to repost a slightly brighter version of the same image.

[edit on 8-10-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Oct, 8 2009 @ 12:38 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Thats awesome!

Even without a telescope, I think I am going to buy a remote trigger for my Olympus evolt e500. I can go up to 60 minutes exposure on the bulb setting, but it's just too hard to hold the cameras button down for that long, especially without moving.



posted on Oct, 8 2009 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by Schmidt1989
This is the milky way over my next door neighbor's house, taken in my backyard. The exposure time was a little over 3 minutes, so it was much darker outside than it looks. You can see clearly that the ISO was at 1600, haha! The aperture on this was probably around 3.5-4.5, I can't remember, and it was never recorded.




Thats not the milky way. That is Ursa Major Constellation aka the big dipper. It is way far away from the milky way.

[edit on 8-10-2009 by whiteblack]



posted on Oct, 8 2009 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by whiteblack
 


Thanks, but it was a typo. Believe me. At least you pointed it out to me, thanks.



posted on Nov, 18 2009 @ 10:11 AM
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Been gone (busy) for a while, here's the reason why:

Took a while to image and assemble this 2 image mosaic.

[edit on 18-11-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Nov, 18 2009 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


That's absolutely amazing.

Nuff said.



posted on Nov, 18 2009 @ 11:31 AM
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to the op, I took a picture just like that a few weeks ago, i saw a green object zoom up from behind the trees in the distance, the shoot off with in milliseconds. Unbelievable, ill get pics up soon



posted on Nov, 19 2009 @ 07:12 AM
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i want to know the type of telescope's yall use.

i want to see jupiter..lol
actually i want to see the moon to like that one also.

But i got no idea what to go buy.
do i buy that cheapO at walmart ?
and cheapest one i can go buy that i can see jupiter with?

Oh can i buy a telescope i can see the ISS with?

all great pic's guys



posted on Nov, 19 2009 @ 07:47 AM
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Originally posted by TheAmused
i want to know the type of telescope's yall use.

Here's the current equivalent model to the telescope I use, though mine is an earlier version made prior to the GPS and ACF versions:
www.optcorp.com...


i want to see jupiter..lol
actually i want to see the moon to like that one also.

If you want to see Jupiter and the moon any decent beginner scope will show you both, but not all beginner telescopes are well-made or easy to operate, and most telescopes will not show these objects in quite as much detail. "Lucky imaging" is used to pull out details even the human eye can't pick up. Here's a clip of the raw video used to make the image of Jupiter seen above:
www.ustream.tv...
That's what you can basically expect to see by eye, and you'll start to see a little more detail than that once you've trained your eye. Also, here's some raw video of the moon shot with the same camera that made the moon mosaic above:
www.youtube.com...
Again, this is a good representation of what you can expect to see by eye. Astrophotography is required to reveal more detail, and a good telescope with tracking motors is required for astrophotography.


But i got no idea what to go buy.
do i buy that cheapO at walmart ?

Noooo, avoid the cheap stuff like the plague. It'll only lead to frustration. Binoculars are more enjoyable if you're on a tight budget.


and cheapest one i can go buy that i can see jupiter with?

This is the absolute cheapest telescope I would ever consider buying:
www.telescope.com/control/product/~category_id=reflectors/~pcategory=telescopes/~product_id=09541
*sorry, ats eats the link

If at all possible though, I would recommend no less than this telescope:
www.telescope.com/control/product/~category_id=reflectors/~pcategory=telescopes/~product_id=08942
*sorry, ats eats the link
The second one is similar to a telescope I had and used for years with great enjoyment.


Oh can i buy a telescope i can see the ISS with?

I've seen guys track ISS by hand and use video cameras to record it with telescopes like the last one I linked to, but I've never been any good at the hand tracking method, and if you want to see it visually in the eyepiece you'll need the telescope to automate the tracking for you. That's really advanced stuff and requires a telescope basically no less capable than the first one I linked to which is like mine. You could probably do it just as successfully with an LX90 like this, but the computerized tracking is a must in order to really "see" it:
www.optcorp.com...


all great pic's guys

Thanks!

[edit on 19-11-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Nov, 19 2009 @ 07:53 AM
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Originally posted by ngchunter
Been gone (busy) for a while, here's the reason why:

Took a while to image and assemble this 2 image mosaic.

[edit on 18-11-2009 by ngchunter]


Oh wow! showing people more images like this would do wonders to get people looking up! Absolutley beautiful!



posted on Nov, 19 2009 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by ngchunter
Been gone (busy) for a while, here's the reason why:

Took a while to image and assemble this 2 image mosaic.

[edit on 18-11-2009 by ngchunter]


That is just bsolutlly stunning. I havnt a clue what or where it is, but the picture is amazing.

Please can you tell us how you took these pictures?

Gareth



posted on Nov, 19 2009 @ 12:24 PM
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Originally posted by gareth01422
That is just bsolutlly stunning. I havnt a clue what or where it is, but the picture is amazing.

Please can you tell us how you took these pictures?

Thanks! It is the Orion Nebula, also known as M42, located right in Orion's sword in the constellation Orion. I used a Canon XTi dSLR attached directly to an 8" LX200 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope (no lenses or eyepieces in between the two). I attached a second smaller LPI camera, which is basically a glorified webcam designed for astronomy, directly to the telescope's viewfinder so that my laptop could monitor a nearby star and send guiding commands to the telescope to keep the image perfectly still. I took a series of 30 second exposures and a series of 5 minute exposures and averaged them together in two groups for each image in the mosaic (upper and lower) for a total of 4 stacked images. Then I used a free program called Qtpfsgui to take the 30 second and 5 minute image stacks and create an HDR image where both the very bright center of the nebula and the very dim outer limits are properly shown without over or under exposure. Finally, I layered the HDR images back over the original 5 minute stacks to make it more natural and then stitched the upper and lower images together with another free program called Autostitch.



posted on Nov, 19 2009 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by gareth01422
That is just bsolutlly stunning. I havnt a clue what or where it is, but the picture is amazing.

Please can you tell us how you took these pictures?

Thanks! It is the Orion Nebula, also known as M42, located right in Orion's sword in the constellation Orion. I used a Canon XTi dSLR attached directly to an 8" LX200 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope (no lenses or eyepieces in between the two). I attached a second smaller LPI camera, which is basically a glorified webcam designed for astronomy, directly to the telescope's viewfinder so that my laptop could monitor a nearby star and send guiding commands to the telescope to keep the image perfectly still. I took a series of 30 second exposures and a series of 5 minute exposures and averaged them together in two groups for each image in the mosaic (upper and lower) for a total of 4 stacked images. Then I used a free program called Qtpfsgui to take the 30 second and 5 minute image stacks and create an HDR image where both the very bright center of the nebula and the very dim outer limits are properly shown without over or under exposure. Finally, I layered the HDR images back over the original 5 minute stacks to make it more natural and then stitched the upper and lower images together with another free program called Autostitch.


If i believed there was a heaven I thing it look something like your picture.

I have also messed around with HDR's too

here are 3 I did last year. Ok so they are not space but hey still HDR.

i247.photobucket.com...

i247.photobucket.com...

i247.photobucket.com...

Gareth



posted on Nov, 19 2009 @ 01:09 PM
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Very well done all around guys.

Ngchunter's M42 is good as any you will ever see.

You got it all in! That took a lot of time and work on your part.

Fantastic job! Really nice. Congrats!

Stars all around! Definitely flagged!

Mob




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