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NASA To Bomb The Moon Friday

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posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:08 AM
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As I understand it a minimum of 350 TONS is going to be ejected.....


So where is the Dust and boulders going to go? I understand it is supposed to be mostly dust...but what is the chance of a lunar boulder reaching escape velocity and hitting earth?

Is it possible?

Even remotely?




posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:12 AM
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Originally posted by titorite

Even remotely?



Pun intended there?

Or not?

I am sure that NASA has it all figured out, we have the world completely in control right now. If theres nothing to worry about down here, nothings going to go wrong up there.



[edit on 9-10-2009 by XXXN3O]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by XXXN3O
 


I am a Pun master! That one was UN-intentional...

And I do not think anything E.L.E. will happen...But if their is even a chance why not use probes like others already have rather then taking the Easy Way...especially if the easy way might Back fire..

I mean if this dust Does fall into earth orbit can you see the threat it would pose? To Satellites, Shuttle missions, The International Space station?

I do not like this easy way NASA is taking..... The Space Agency needs to be re-organized.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:34 AM
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reply to post by XXXN3O
 

Nothing worse than happens with the dozens of equal natural impacts which occur each year. Or the stronger natural impacts that happen with somewhat less frequency. Or the other various spacecraft which have hit the Moon. Including the Saturn boosters during the Apollo program. They hit at about the same speed but carried 7.5 times the mass.
www.physorg.com...



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:37 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I hear you.

I have been doing some reading and if this is the case its nothing to worry about.

All I am saying is that theres enough problems here without moving on to the moon.

If the moon is continuously chipped away for resources, it is not infinite is all.





posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 04:30 AM
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is anyone going to watch this live?


...whether it's standing outside, or watching it on NASA's website?

it starts in 45 minutes, though i can't imagine it'd get interesting until around 15 minutes before impact.

...i'm tempted to take a nap before the show...



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:27 AM
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Last I checked, the moon has alot to do with the tides, magnetism and protecting us from space projectiles. Who the [snip] do NASA think they are to be able to bomb the moon? Is it their moon? This shoulda been more publicised. Where's Mr. Kubrick?

 


Removed censor circumvention

[edit on 9/10/09 by masqua]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:41 AM
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I just watched it. It looks like it was a success.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:42 AM
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Well that sure was uneventful. I liked how the one guy who seemed to be in charge packed up his bags and left literally SECONDS after the collision and then denied a high-five to one of the younger guys.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:42 AM
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Watched it - doesn't seem anything happened.

Even the NASA people discussing it right now - seem a little confused, if something actually happened.

Saw dust when the craft hit - but saw nothing from a bomb!

Did something stop it?



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:44 AM
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In principle it sounds cool



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:45 AM
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Originally posted by rgrthat
Well that sure was uneventful. I liked how the one guy who seemed to be in charge packed up his bags and left literally SECONDS after the collision and then denied a high-five to one of the younger guys.


Yep, I wondered EXACT same thing.......odd.

Perhaps we'll get better images. I mean they supposedly (cough) were able to show
Apollo lander remnants right?



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:46 AM
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Originally posted by rgrthat
Well that sure was uneventful. I liked how the one guy who seemed to be in charge packed up his bags and left literally SECONDS after the collision and then denied a high-five to one of the younger guys.


yea i saw that too lol

best part of the whole show, unfortunately...


btw, at 10am EST they're supposed to air a post-impact news conference...

[edit on 9-10-2009 by adrenochrome]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:46 AM
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Originally posted by questioningall
Watched it - doesn't seem anything happened.

Even the NASA people discussing it right now - seem a little confused, if something actually happened.

Saw dust when the craft hit - but saw nothing from a bomb!

Did something stop it?


Yeah, I didn't see anything at all.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:49 AM
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Yawn, I woke up for that. Heck, "the data will be coming in shortly" but those talking heads forgot to mention we won't be sharing any with you.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:50 AM
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I watched it live and saw absolutely NOTHING. The NASA blokes on the radio seemed rather confused too, although they reckon they were detecting something in thermal view.

Apparently the LRO was orbiting 50km above taking happy snaps and the data will be downloaded in about 2 hours. When, and if, they post these images to the web I will post them here. Hopefully they will show something other than NOTHING!



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:56 AM
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On second thought there was something, how the heck does the temperature vary so much in so little area. I wish I could review the thermals but it seemed like in the middle of the crater was a deep red spot.

One would think that the temp would gradually change into the unlit areas. I'm not speculating anything just as this point trying to figure out why such sharp thermals.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:58 AM
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reply to post by EarthFallingApart
 


I think the red spot you are referring to is the rim of the little crater directly above the impact site - the crater rim is higher than the outside of the impact crater rim and therefore catches all of the sunlight that would otherwise end up in the crater.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 07:04 AM
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How is the mission a success?

I was under the impression that a good chunk of the objectives was to analyze the dust plume and debris that went 10km+ above the surface. They were supposed to analyze all that and try to detect ice or water.

Then the other part being the craft crashing into the impact crater to analyze that, on the surface.

So... a partial success?? No such thing. It's either a success or failure.

Also, that guy packing his stuff up and leaving as soon as they started clapping was funny, but a little strange. Everybody seemed confused..



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 07:09 AM
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reply to post by Kryties
 



I understand that but what i'm trying to say is from what i can remember seeing it was VERY distinct, maybe I didn't see it properly, who knows. What i'm trying to say is that its very hard for a general source of heat(sun) to distinctly heat specific areas.


General moon:

www.telegraph.co.uk...

Human body (produces heat):




See the difference is external heat, heats evenly, internal heat is very distinct.

Anyways like I said, not implying anything yet, just trying to remember what I saw and understand.

Edit: One more picture, This is what i mean, there's no deep red that goes to blue/purple




[edit on 9-10-2009 by EarthFallingApart]






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