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Lasers Used for Propulsion

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posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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You can tell this clip is pretty old, but i have never heard or seen anything quite like this before, i don't know if this technology took off or not, but the lack of publicity causes me to wonder if it hasn't been picked up primarily by the military.



Something else eh?



[edit on 10/4/2009 by Alaskan Man]




posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 03:41 PM
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very cool tech here, looks alot like UFO tech



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 04:03 PM
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Really enjoyable stuff. I'm going to be reading up on this further.

s+f



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 04:16 PM
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a dead end,
the amount of energy required to lift the model with a laser far exceeds that of a chemical rocket required to lift the same mass.

[edit on 4-10-2009 by punkinworks]



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by Alaskan Man
 


WOW


They haven't made any advancements since the late 80s early 90s?

That's when I first saw these tests. Somebody should be funding these guys.



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


It has advanced, they are now using an inert solid as a propellant, the laser vaporizes the material to provide thrust.
the whole system has several limitations,
one is the vehicle has to stay absolutely directly above the laser, any variance leads to an uneven exhaust pulse, and in the several minutes it takes to reach orbit the ground station will have moved many miles in relation to the vehicle.



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 05:56 PM
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Back in the day I saw pictures of the capacitors they used to help generate the laser pulses for this program in a newspaper, they were about half the size of a truck. According to the article they reused them for the SDI program.



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 

that whole trailer building complex in the video is the laser
and thats to lift just a few grams of mass



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 07:45 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks
reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 

that whole trailer building complex in the video is the laser
and thats to lift just a few grams of mass



that was 20 years ago tho, imagine if they some how (i don't believe this just use your imagination lol) got the power source drastically reduced in size and managed to some how calibrate the laser to only effect air molecules at a short distance, then it could be mounted on some sort of vehicle and used as the propulsion... (out there i know haha)



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 10:39 PM
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well the military always had this advantage. to be able to see technologies the other ppl will learn about many years later



posted on Oct, 5 2009 @ 04:39 AM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


B.S. An airspike will allow speeds exceeding Mach 12 within the atmosphere. The G-force alone will be enough to turn the pilots into scrambled egg. They will have to be immersed in a fluid.

You should really do your research before posting ignorant quippets.



posted on Oct, 5 2009 @ 08:55 AM
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Scientists have been working on this form of propulsion for years, not yet viable, because the laser used to power the video in this thread chews up power at an unbelievable rate.

There is currently a competition at the collegiate level to get supplies into orbit cheaply, a few of the teams are working with laser powered elevators, check out the site below.

spaceelevatorgames.org



posted on Oct, 5 2009 @ 09:03 AM
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I'm not going to search for the source, you can do that... but this was a local story here a couple years ago.... this was a team working down in Whitesands Missile range to develop a replacement for the NASA space shuttle... It was all very impressive the local news showed lots of footage and it all seemed very Buck Rodgers ....

Sadly they didn't make the cut... Lockheed Martin got the contract so their going with something more traditional Shuttle replacement



posted on Oct, 5 2009 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by Matyas
 


what the F are you talking about,

all i said was that it uses so much more energy to do it the way they are doing it in the video, than to use a chemical rocket.
you cant get enough thrust from hot air alone for anything larger than aa small model.



posted on Oct, 5 2009 @ 11:58 AM
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Originally posted by ARNETT 187
There is currently a competition at the collegiate level to get supplies into orbit cheaply, a few of the teams are working with laser powered elevators, check out the site below.

spaceelevatorgames.org



Thanks for the interesting link!

The OP presents another interesting way to convert laser power into mechanical energy, so also relevant in that regard.



posted on Oct, 5 2009 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


Well they show an airspike in the video too which would work at a given speed like a ram or scram, it is not just a laser. A powerful magnetic field is necessary, and a maser would chew up a lot less power in that configuration.

Get the F up on your research dude and stop kicking everything to the curb because it doesn't fit your ideas right from the start. If everyone did what you just did there would be no science, invention, innovation, or progress, but fortunately we live in a world where not everyone marches to the same drummer...



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 01:05 AM
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reply to post by Matyas
 


Ok
when i watched the video, I didnt see tha last 2 minutes of sci fantasy, the video was locking up.
That bing said that last little bit is in the realm of science fantasy right now.
There is no way at this point in time to even come close to a lighter than air craft that could sustain the stresses of the velocity needed to achieve orbit.

And the space elevator concepts being tried by the university contest are very different from a free flight vehicle.

So my WTF was premature but it doesnt change the fact that the concept in the last couple minutes is not within the realm of current engineering capabilities nor is it in the near future.



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 03:58 AM
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reply to post by punkinworks
 


O-K I'll give you lockup 'cause its 'puters &crap which are oh-so advanced, but even as far out as it seems no one has thought of trying it out on the ground first...which makes more sense by removing many objections...and no it isn't the same as the space elevator business, which is a whole 'nuther area I'll touch on sometime later.

I think we can do superconductive electromagnets, an we got masers before lasers, so why is it so science fictionish to set up an airspike ahead of some superconducting electromagnet on a rail powered by a maser say three hundred or so miles away? Is it because the English are so much better at science and engineering that all we can do is scratch our butts and dream?

In that case it is really science fictionish and you may continue being premature for the next hundred years because I know for a fact it will not happen in that case.

Speaking of which, back in the day I would take characters like you out to the mountains with a case of beer, and when we came back there was consensus. Didn't matter who was right, there was consensus. Domestication ruins everything. Its refreshing to have a good healthy fight ever so rarely. And it builds comradery. But I suppose the world has gone soft.



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