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Litle Black "Thing"

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posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by Devino
 


Sorry... have to work for a living .. and couldn't post till now.

I do understand your point and it was my first thought. But when you see an image from it behind a planet that makes it very strange.
I strongly believe that Nasa as been doing home work. On the 26.10.2009 Nasa did the 2nd satellite rotation. The first was just a correction so that we couldn't see it... the last one was at leest 270º rotation. Now if they did that the flaw should be in a different position shouldn't it ?

Also when you see an image from a planet reflecting Sun light.. many times in the image you see a strip of light. Like this..

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

Now take a good look at todays images..

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

Can you see a strip of dark Light, a strip shadow ??

What about Its position after rotatin ..??

I do not believe it to be a flaw... maybe it is.. but.. something isn't right.




posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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Originally posted by Lastone
Now if they did that the flaw should be in a different position shouldn't it ?

Depends on whether or not the electron trap is intrinsic to a certain group of pixels. If it is then it will tend to appear in the same location.


Also when you see an image from a planet reflecting Sun light.. many times in the image you see a strip of light. Like this..

That's called blooming coupled with wells that do not completely unfill as they're read off, another common CCD artifact in CCDs without anti-blooming gates. Most scientific CCDs lack blooming gates intentionally.
faulkes-telescope.com...
Basically, as the wells of the CCD are read off, strong signals can leave behind trails as they migrate towards the reader.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 02:41 PM
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This is very interesting..Id sure like to know for sure if it was a flaw..

You are showing many floods around the world..well right here in the US we are having very unusual weather..Im in Missouri..and it has rained for over a week straight..I told my son we need to build an Ark..I mean..I guess if we were in Ireland..it wouldnt be abnormal..but Missouri?



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Yes... I know that.. you're right about it.

quote:

"Basically, as the wells of the CCD are read off, strong signals can leave behind trails as they migrate towards the reader."

So are you saying that this is caused by a strong signal ???

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

Because if you are... that isn't a flaw... do you see my point ?



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by Yummy Freelunch
 


I do understand you.. because that is the big problem.. the question..

Is it a flaw.. ??' I do not believe it to be.. can I prove it without any dought ?

No... not now.

But recent events ... changes... all connected to stereo observations makes me thing.. a lot.




posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by Lastone

So are you saying that this is caused by a strong signal ???

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

Because if you are... that isn't a flaw... do you see my point ?

I'm afraid I don't see your point; a signal is a signal as far as a CCD's readout trail is concerned. A CCD doesn't care if the signal (positive or negative) is genuine or the result of an artifact like an electron trap, it'll act the way it always does regardless.

Electrons try to migrate from above the electron trap to the readout, they hit the electron trap and a portion remain as the wells are not being properly completely cleared with each migration, plus some stay stuck in the trap itself causing a dark streak. Make sense?

[edit on 28-10-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


No it doesn't. Not to me.

Not trying to explain this situation.

Because if it was a flaw .. and using your explanation you wouldn't be able to see the "flaw" behind a planet... it wouldn't show. The light refleted from the planet would make it impossible to see the "flaw".

Take a look at this sequence.

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

If I'm wrong ..sorry. Do explain it to me.

And Thanks .



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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Sorry... on the 26.10.2009 it was 360º roll maneuver.

SOHO News

Solar and Heliospheric Observatory

SOHO Spacecraft Roll Maneuver
SOHO will perform a special 360-degree science roll maneuver on 26-Oct-09 between 13:50 and 23:50 UT. The roll comprises 10 segments (10
degrees, 8 x 45 degrees, -10 degrees), after which SOHO will be back in its nominal roll attitude. During the manuever, images and movies will also appear
rotated. The next quarterly 180-degree roll maneuver is scheduled for 7-Nov-09.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by Lastone
 


Astroether maybe? Was there any planet alignments when that black artifact appeared? Like sun -venus-mars? At least 3planets alignment?



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 06:55 PM
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Not that I can tell.

I've been watching it and also the planets locations. As I see it, the first time that it realy started to make big changes on the solar sistem was on the 26.01.2009.

And as i see it, jupiter was aligned with "it" and the Sun. A huge blast from jupiter
They found a new black spot on jupiter 4 months after. They say if was the result of a meteor impact. I don't think so, but I'm just a guy looking at the sky and at information. I do not have the knowledge to make statements. I'm just giving my opinion about it....talking about it.
If anyone can confirm this it would be great.

Let me show you.... I believe it to be jupiter. See what happens.

from 26.01.2009 till 01.02.2009

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...

Amazing isn't it ..???



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 08:35 AM
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Originally posted by Lastone
reply to post by ngchunter
 


No it doesn't. Not to me.

That's unfortunate. I don't know how to explain the principle of electron traps leaving streaks as pixels migrate to the reader any simpler than that.


Not trying to explain this situation.

Because if it was a flaw .. and using your explanation you wouldn't be able to see the "flaw" behind a planet... it wouldn't show.

I didn't say that. That would depend on the strength of the electron trap.


The light refleted from the planet would make it impossible to see the "flaw".

Take a look at this sequence.

I see a single column of dead pixels running the length of the CCD when the planet sits on the electron trap (which is not a flaw, it's an electron trap - a flaw implies a permanent problem, electron traps can be cleared by bakeouts). Single columns of dead pixels are extremely indicative of a CCD issue, not a real object. I'm amazed you thought it was a real object because of a dead column.

[edit on 29-10-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by Lastone

And as i see it, jupiter was aligned with "it" and the Sun. A huge blast from jupiter

That's not a blast, that's a lens flare. It happens every single time a sufficiently bright object enters or leaves the heliospheric imager frame.


They found a new black spot on jupiter 4 months after. They say if was the result of a meteor impact. I don't think so, but I'm just a guy looking at the sky and at information.

It was, trust me. Amateur astronomers were looking at Jupiter in the days before the impact and saw nothing, in fact one saw it only hours before the impact; there was no spot there, it was not from a blast from Jupiter, which is something that also didn't happen. I remember debunking that "blast" when it supposedly happened months ago.

[edit on 29-10-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Nov, 24 2009 @ 02:34 AM
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A little off topic butt...can anyone tell me what the big black spots are on stereo cor1. Thanks.

Ahead

stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov...



posted on Nov, 24 2009 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by xrc12000
 


Looks like dead pixels from an over-exposure. Even the occulting disk has "pixel noise" in it when it should theoretically be pitch black if the CCD had no natural noise level. This black streak thing is just dead, not even background noise.



posted on Nov, 24 2009 @ 12:48 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Thanks for the info.

2nd line



posted on Feb, 7 2012 @ 08:48 PM
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Just found your post.

I know what your little black thing is-A black hole!!!! or sometimes it is called a Black Sun and you are right, the black thing doesn't move as it the anchor to our Solar system. The Sun moves around it.

A book called 'Doomsday Ahead' tells us it is a Black hole and that is how I know what it is.

This has been kept a secret by ancient societies and now NASA. Black and white tiles on Church floors.

MS15 is one of its names given by Inigo Swann
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Look on this video you can see the Black thing/hole/Sun in the Antarctic;



Hope you see this post.




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