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NASA's Apollo DSE "Black Box" Transcripts - revealing the unscripted truth about the Moon & E.T.

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posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by ocker
 

In the shadowed craters the ice should continue to accumulate. That's the point of the mission, to find out how much water is in those dark places.




posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by Luppakorva
 


Hi
yes I believe that water vapor or gas would form a cloud small or large
the cloud would stay close to the surface and not rise to a great height .

it would move with the solar winds until the temp dropped and they(vapours) fell back down as a solid.

I bet we could even get Phage to agree on this.

Ocker



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 01:18 AM
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reply to post by ocker
 


Thanks for the info, I really appreciate it.

And thanks for stepping in to this thread. It just gets getting more and more interesting day by day



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 07:54 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 

Yes, but then, under that Sun, why would the dirt remain dark?

If the difference between dark and bright dirt was the humidity why would it take so long to make it as bright as it was before? And if what we see in LROC images is this darker dirt then it means that it's still darker after all these years, very unlikely to be because of any water mixed with it.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 07:56 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Would it make you happier if I had used some fancy wording like "prosaic explanation", for example, that looks to be the fashionable word at the moment?

Yesterday, at 2 AM, I didn't thought of any fancy words.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 07:59 AM
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Originally posted by ocker
The water would vaporize and be blown by solar winds and with your theory some would land again when the sun went down.
I don't know how much it would be blown away by solar winds, isn't the solar wind coming from the same direction as the sunlight?

If it is, then at noon the solar wind would be blowing the vapour onto the surface again, right?



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


I think you forget the point that it's not always directly into the surface where sun points to, moon's not a straight wall in front of the sun, right? Even if it is towards the moon but there's no atmosphere and very weak gravity ... is that possible? I don't dare to say more since I simply don't know.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by Luppakorva
 

I didn't forgot it, I just oversimplified the situation.


Considering the angle of the sunlight, if the solar wind "blows" the hypothetical (I say hypothetical because I think nobody has ever detected water vapour over the Moon) vapour then in the morning it would be blown in the direction of the sunset, at noon it will be blown against the surface and at sunset it will be blown back to the start.

I don't know how things work, but maybe it works like that, I don't think that's too far fetched.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 09:50 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by ocker
The water would vaporize and be blown by solar winds and with your theory some would land again when the sun went down.
I don't know how much it would be blown away by solar winds, isn't the solar wind coming from the same direction as the sunlight?

If it is, then at noon the solar wind would be blowing the vapour onto the surface again, right?


Hi ArMap

Well I was trying to get a hypothesis on the theory that Phage posted
why dont you ask him. he suggested this theory



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
If it is, then at noon the solar wind would be blowing the vapour onto the surface again, right?


So your saying it's a closed loop? All these millions of years and not a drop escapes? Hmmm maybe gravity is higher than we thought



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 11:44 PM
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Phage is correct in that we have only detected water on the surface of the Moon... But this is exactly why Zorgon may be right! We simply don't know if the water is rising up from below the surface or not.

quote from www.space.com...


Previous research has uncovered some water trapped in minerals deep inside the moon, Crotts said. According to his model, this water is likely to travel up through fissures to the lunar surface along with other gases that are escaping the pressure of the moon's dense interior.

"We now know that there's water in the interior," Crotts told SPACE.com. "There's no particular reason to think that it doesn't get out."





[edit on 10-10-2009 by fieryjaguarpaw]

[edit on 10-10-2009 by fieryjaguarpaw]



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 01:06 AM
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Originally posted by fieryjaguarpaw
"We now know that there's water in the interior," Crotts told SPACE.com. "There's no particular reason to think that it doesn't get out."


Hence the long NASA list of TLP's showing 'out gassing events'




posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:16 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Hi Zorgon

Nasa is being forced lately to share their discovery's that they have not published publicly to the media before.
what we are seeing now is just the start it will interesting to see what else they will disclose when they release their so called data from the lcross impact.

thanks

Ocker



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:20 AM
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interesting article on Space.com if anyone cares to read it.


It's Official: Water Found on the Moon



"The isotopes of oxygen that exist on the moon are the same as those that exist on Earth, so it was difficult if not impossible to tell the difference between water from the moon and water from Earth," said Larry Taylor of the University of Tennessee,



"The Deep Impact observations of the Moon not only unequivocally confirm the presence of [water/hydroxyl] on the lunar surface, but also reveal that the entire lunar surface is hydrated during at least some portion of the lunar day," the authors wrote in their study.

The findings of all three spacecraft "provide unambiguous evidence for the presence of hydroxyl or water," said Paul Lucey of the University of Hawaii in an opinion essay accompanying the three studies. Lucey was not involved in any of the missions.

The new data "prompt a critical reexamination of the notion that the moon is dry. It is not," Lucey wrote.



There are potentially two types of water on the moon: that brought from outside sources, such as water-bearing comets striking the surface, or that that originates on the moon.

This second, endogenic, source is thought to possibly come from the interaction of the solar wind with moon rocks and soils.

The rocks and regolith that make up the lunar surface are about 45 percent oxygen (combined with other elements as mostly silicate minerals). The solar wind — the constant stream of charged particles emitted by the sun — are mostly protons, or positively charged hydrogen atoms.

If the charged hydrogens, which are traveling at one-third the speed of light, hit the lunar surface with enough force, they break apart oxygen bonds in soil materials, Taylor, the M3 team member suspects. Where free oxygen and hydrogen exist, there is a high chance that trace amounts of water will form.


www.space.com...




yes there is water on the Moon and some things might need a drink of it once in a while...








posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:33 AM
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reply to post by easynow
 


Hi Easynow,

the 2nd picture, where is that from? Thanks for these pics you're posting
. There's quite a few what I have not seen so far.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:42 AM
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reply to post by Luppakorva
 




Hello Luppakorva,

that version of the tower or shard was posted by John Lear a few years ago. i didn't say that in the post because i didn't want people to start arguing about Mr. Lear. glad your enjoying the pics that are being posted


here is a link you might like

www.bibliotecapleyades.net...

here's one from that collection i find interesting...




posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:45 AM
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reply to post by easynow
 


Hi Easynow
still laughing from other day


on a serious note


"The Deep Impact observations of the Moon not only unequivocally confirm the presence of [water/hydroxyl] on the lunar surface, but also reveal that the entire lunar surface is hydrated during at least some portion of the lunar day," the authors wrote in their study.


Now if we just can get everyone to concur that during the lunar sun, parts of solid water on the surface turns into a gaseous state (water vapor) forms a cloud that blows around a little collects some more sun turning parts it into protons and hydroxyl ions and they disperse into the never never. Come the end of day the rest fall back down to rest before a new day.

there you go.

Ocker



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:56 AM
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reply to post by easynow
 


Ah ok, Lear's stuff. I actually have a lot of respect towards Mr Lear, he's honest, open and genuinely behind every word he says. Which reminds me from that I listened some radio show few nights ago where he said that nowadays he thinks Americans never went to the moon.

Anyways, that paperclip is very interesting indeed, what also puzzles me is that it seems to "reflect" light as you can see white areas in both sides or is there just something very reflecting behind?

What are your thoughts about that castle pic, I have been wondering that picture for a long time.




This enigmatic object from frame AS10-32-4822 is literally hanging some seven miles above the Lunar surface. This side by side comparison is from 2 different versions of the same Apollo 10 photographic frame, one obtained by Hoagland and the other by another researcher. In fact, Hoagland has now identified some nine versions of this photo in various archives around the world. Evidently part of "power winder" sequence of photo's taken by the Astronauts, this allows for positive verification of the reality of this object.

Not only does the "Castle" change position relative to the spacecraft - exactly as a real suspended object would - strange, glass-like "panes" evidently pass between the spacecraft and the "Castle". This is strong confirmation of a "glass" dome in the Sinus Medii region of the Moon. Note also in the enhanced image on the right a "cable" passing thru the tip of the "Castle". It droops under the weight of this object, precisely as a real suspension cable would. The unenhanced version on the left corroborates the cellular structure of the "Castle".


I would love to see these 9 versions as well..



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 06:04 AM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Ok
.

My thoughts are it would still "leak" into the space, slowly but for sure it would. That would need moon to be able to form new water particles from practically "nothing".

It's very interesting though, if there's water even in our moon.... I think that tells us it's pretty common in the universe ..and water = first steps towards life, right?



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 

Not really, it's just an interpretation of what may be happening.

And I don't have any idea if the Moon's gravity would be strong enough or not.



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