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A move to Alaska

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posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 07:50 PM
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Hi kids. With a recent medical issue,my dearest wife and I have talked about a career change for me. I had hoped to enter the world of politics here in Utah, but financial issues, familial issues stood in the way. With encouragement from my little bride, I have given my CV to the Alaskan Tribal Consortium. I'd be doing some travel from place to place in Alaska, (via seaplane, snow-mobile, and single engine aircraft) with Anchorage being my base.

The Tribal Consortium is kinda giddy at having me, and it looks like I may have to make a decision in a week or so.

Do any of you fine folks live in AK? I would honour your input and insight in the last frontier.

Mike
AKA Cheesecake Larry

ps, started this in a BTS thread, but thought it might garner more attention on ATS as well. Apologies if there is an issue, mods.




posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 07:51 PM
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I lived in Alaska for 4 years. Left a year ago. Feel free to ask any me any questions you have!

[edit on September 25th 2009 by greeneyedleo]



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by greeneyedleo
 


Cost of living, we'll be negotiating salary next week. What's it like there?

Weather? We live in northern Utah, how much of a change?

Buy? Rent? What should we expect?

Schools, our son is 6 he'll be going there, home school?

What can we expect?

I make mid 60's here. Will be moving to a higher position there. What could/should I expect?

My wife is from central Illinois, she adapted ok to Utah, will AK be a shock to the system?

Gun laws? Conceal/carry? I've got firearms in Utah. What do I need to do with them? Sell?



yeah, just a few questions. . . .



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by mikerussellus
 



I was at Elmendorf AFB when I was in the service. I hated it.

Anchorage sucks! Constant grey skies! Huge mosquitoes!!!

Perhaps you can enter politics in AK. Their Gov. bailed.




[edit on 25-9-2009 by whaaa]



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 11:21 PM
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Originally posted by whaaa
reply to post by mikerussellus
 



I was at Elmendorf AFB when I was in the service. I hated it.

Anchorage sucks! Constant grey skies! Huge mosquitoes!!!

Perhaps you can enter politics in AK. Their Gov. bailed.




[edit on 25-9-2009 by whaaa]


I was at Eielson AFB in Fairbanks. Anchorage is 1000% better than Fairbanks! Seriously



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by mikerussellus
 


Dude!

I was in "O" Company, Arctic Rangers, 75th Infantry based just outside of Anchorage, and I've always longed to get back.

It's been a while since I've been there, but once you get the lowdown on the COL and wages, which are and must be higher than in the Lower 48, the rest is all good.

Anchorage and the surrounding country is beautiful. The temperature is more moderated in Anchorage than say Fairbanks, since Fairbanks is much more inland, and Anchorage is on the water.

It's a hunter/fisherman's paradise. The people are good people, independent, and friendly.

In the Ranger Company, we were always out and about the state, from Point Barrow, to Little Diomedes, to Bethel, Nome, Sitka, and Kiska.

You will love it.

Folks don't seem to get as sick in Alaska, especially in the cooler regions, whether from proximity to the Arctic Circle or at higher altitudes.

If you'll be traveling, you'll likely be able to work up some trade with the Inuit. I traded rifles, pistols, and ammunition for furs, ivory, and jade. A ton of jade just north of Nome.

It works better in some of the more remote areas that are more difficult to get to. You get a good network going, and you can double your income without much effort.

Nothing like putting on a parka late at night when it's really snowing, and taking a walk. There is a complete absence of sound.

It's big, and it can be lonely a bit for a woman left behind a lot, but the country is quite a companion in of itself.

If you climb one of the mountains just outside Anchorage, on a clear day, you can see Mt. McKinley in the distance.

Glacier-fed streams, with water so cold that you'll never need a cooler while camping.

Chip out some ice from the nearby glaciers, and you're using ice from snowfall that fell tens of thousands of years ago.

If you go up there to do well and enjoy the country, you'll really enjoy it.

If you go up there and you like staying indoors playing scrabble, you won't like Alaska.

Go.

See the country. Enjoy it.

Make friends.



[edit on 25-9-2009 by dooper]



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by dooper
 





Nothing like putting on a parka late at night when it's really snowing, and taking a walk. There is a complete absence of sound.


There is nothing like it. Gawd, I love the wilderness, and the mountains



posted on Sep, 26 2009 @ 01:21 AM
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Lets see... Mosquitoes... big ones.... HUGE ONES

By the MILLIONS...

OH and did I mention MOSQUITOES?



Alaska Report
borealkraut.blogspot.com...






posted on Sep, 26 2009 @ 03:03 AM
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Hi, I've lived in Alaska all my life and I can easily say that there is no other place like it on earth.
I live on the Peninsula, and it is only now beginning to cool off, winters have become much milder then they used to be. We are experiencing global warming like no other place on earth.
My wife and I are homeschooling our daughter, my father works for ANTHC, there is no permit required for open, or concealed firearms, and there is no permitting required.There is no such thing as excessive ammunition, I say this having talked to a trooper the other day when I had my .45 on the dash loaded with six clips in my bag, and a British .303 with 40 rounds. As for cost of living, I have found it cheaper to live here, but then the pay is also better, the PFD that we got last year was $3200.00, and this year it $1305.00 The economy is crap here just like everywhere, but with the position that you have with the tribe you're set. Since you're in Anchorage you have a lot at your disposal, just bear in mind the distances that you will have to travel for work. For me, it's a little over 300 miles to get to Anchorage, and that makes me happy, I think it's 900 to Fairbanks.
What you gain by leaving the lower 48 is an excessive amount of freedom, freedom to do whatever you want. Most people can't take it and end up moving back to the states to rejoin there fellow oppressed. It takes strength to move to Alaska, it takes determination to stay, and after a time you never want to leave. My Grandfather is 93 and he did a mile each morning up until 90. He founded the Alaska Marine Highway System, we are a founding family. I like many Alaskan take trips to the backyard (Hawaii) and the prices are tailored for us. Right now I can go into town and pick up a round trip for $160.00 with a two week stay. There are many perks to living here, and although many try living here the land itself makes the final judgment. You should do fine, just keep your eyes wide open and take in your surroundings, it's a different world here. Where many in the states would call reverence for the earth "hippy" here it is part of the tribal and social dynamic, if you can't show a modicum of sensitivity you will step on peoples toes. Which brings up another issue, I being Alaskan Native (Aleut) can say that working for the tribe you will need to show respect in order to earn it, you're working for a sovereign nation at that point and the dogmas and social standards that you think may be important in the setting that you are in, have no value whatsoever there. It's a different dynamic all together. I and many others here in Alaska feel a warm disconnectedness with the United States, living here is like being in another country. It is still the norm that if you get a flat tire someone will pull over before you can change it. Also, if you see someone walking on the side of the road during the winter, state law says that you have to pick them up. Different place, different time.............



posted on Sep, 26 2009 @ 05:04 AM
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Originally posted by zorgon
Lets see... Mosquitoes... big ones.... HUGE ONES

By the MILLIONS...

OH and did I mention MOSQUITOES?



Alaska Report
borealkraut.blogspot.com...





LOL Excellent !!! I neeeded that.

You neglected the most important question...

Why did you leave AK?



Oh wait, that was just answered by Zorgon.



posted on Sep, 26 2009 @ 08:18 AM
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reply to post by EliyahuHaNave
 


Wow. Thanks for the info. I can't wait to move there. My wife (her idea, mind you) is having second thoughts but is still excited. She also got a job with the Tribal Consortium, (she's an RN) but will travel much less than I.

Right now we're waiting to hear back in terms of salary, expenses, reimbursement for the move, that sort of thing. My wife wants to be there in a month, before real winter sets in. Heck, here in Utah they're looking at snow next week.



posted on Sep, 26 2009 @ 08:42 AM
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Thank you all for the information. I'm humbled by the general consensus for Alaska.

Believe it or not, it's input like this that will help seal the deal.

My humble and sincerest thanks to you all. . . .



posted on Sep, 26 2009 @ 08:55 AM
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Anyone know of the opportunities for nurses in Alaska?



posted on Sep, 26 2009 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by Zosynspiracy
 


My wife is a nurse. Big oppourtunities there.







 
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