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Superheavy Element 114: Confirmed

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posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 10:16 PM
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(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been able to confirm the production of the superheavy element 114, ten years after a group in Russia, at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, first claimed to have made it. The search for 114 has long been a key part of the quest for nuclear science's hoped-for Island of Stability.


Link

I can hear Bob Lazar now, "#!*& only one more element to go before they figure out I'm full of crap!"


The legendary "island of stability" has been pushed back until perhaps element 126, which is a little disappointing. Besides research purposes, these elements probably won't find a use until they make it ashore the island, when they do I'll be very curious to see what can be done.

[edit on 9/24/2009 by ZombieOctopus]




posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by ZombieOctopus
 


Bob Lazar is right.
You will find out 2013.
I know where you can find some Element 115.
Papoose Lake, Nevada.

------------------------------------------

Look at it this way.
What's the difference between depleted uranium and
weapons grade uranium?
One is completely harmless. The other is not.


[edit on 24-9-2009 by Eurisko2012]



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 01:29 AM
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Originally posted by Eurisko2012
Look at it this way.
What's the difference between depleted uranium and
weapons grade uranium?
One is completely harmless. The other is not.


So depleted uranium is completely harmless? Maybe you should do a little research before you make such statements. Depleted uranium is radioactive and is a toxic metal. Toxic does NOT equal harmless.



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 10:08 AM
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Originally posted by Angus65

Originally posted by Eurisko2012
Look at it this way.
What's the difference between depleted uranium and
weapons grade uranium?
One is completely harmless. The other is not.


So depleted uranium is completely harmless? Maybe you should do a little research before you make such statements. Depleted uranium is radioactive and is a toxic metal. Toxic does NOT equal harmless.


Ummmm........


Depleted uranium is a heavy metal that is also slightly radioactive. Heavy metals (uranium, lead, tungsten, etc.) have chemical toxicity properties that, in high doses, can cause adverse health effects. Depleted uranium that remains outside the body can not harm you.

A common misconception is that radiation is depleted uranium's primary hazard. This is not the case under most battlefield exposure scenarios. Depleted uranium is approximately 40 percent less radioactive than natural uranium. Depleted uranium emits alpha and beta particles, and gamma rays. Alpha particles, the primary radiation type produced by depleted uranium, are blocked by skin, while beta particles are blocked by the boots and battle dress utility uniform (BDUs) typically worn by Service members. While gamma rays are a form of highly-penetrating energy , the amount of gamma radiation emitted by depleted uranium is very low. Thus, depleted uranium does not significantly add to the background radiation that we encounter every day.


Source

Do you plan on ingesting it? If not then yes it is harmless...

[edit on 25-9-2009 by DaMod]



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by Eurisko2012
reply to post by ZombieOctopus
 


Bob Lazar is right.
You will find out 2013.
I know where you can find some Element 115.
Papoose Lake, Nevada.



It's not looking like 115 will be stable anymore. Back in 1989 when Lazar was spinning his tale, physics was pointing to the island of stability coming much sooner down the line, Lazar's story is a victim of the times. If he tried to pass it off today, he would probably say it was 125.

When 115 comes and goes, will you still believe?



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by ZombieOctopus
 


Wait...Wait....Wait!!!

I can positively verify and support a stable nuclear weight sample of 115 WITHIN a positronic stability wave matrix plasmatic effect field....

Hang on....I got the patent somewhere.....

Nah!!!! Joking.

BUT....it was once posited that a person would DIE if they moved faser than 50 MPH......

Science.....ahhhhh.....always expanding research.....



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 02:45 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
reply to post by ZombieOctopus
 

BUT....it was once posited that a person would DIE if they moved faser than 50 MPH......

Science.....ahhhhh.....always expanding research.....



I like to hover around 47MPH for that very reason, no point in tempting fate imo.



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by Angus65

Originally posted by Eurisko2012
Look at it this way.
What's the difference between depleted uranium and
weapons grade uranium?
One is completely harmless. The other is not.


So depleted uranium is completely harmless? Maybe you should do a little research before you make such statements. Depleted uranium is radioactive and is a toxic metal. Toxic does NOT equal harmless.


It is harmless.
I wouldn't eat it if i were you.
I was in the U.S. Navy for 10 years.
We had a Close In Weapon System on board.
It fired 3,000 rounds per minute. It fired
depleted uranium bullets.
Our technicians had a supply of uranium bullets 5 foot high.
They would lay on top of the bullets and read magazines
during lunch.
I guess it could still give you heavy metal poisoning like mercury.
Don't eat it.


[edit on 25-9-2009 by Eurisko2012]

[edit on 25-9-2009 by Eurisko2012]



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 04:23 PM
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The legendary "island of stability" has been pushed back until perhaps element 126, which is a little disappointing. Besides research purposes, these elements probably won't find a use until they make it ashore the island, when they do I'll be very curious to see what can be done.
[edit on 9/24/2009 by ZombieOctopus]

Not necessarily, the element 114 produced had only 176 neutrons, the 114 that was predicted to be in the island of stability would have 184 neutrons. Until we can find a way to create an element with the requisite number of neutrons, we can't expect stability.

The fact that element 114 with 176 neutrons was unstable was not a surprise, what was a surprise was that it was as stable as it was, taking around a half second to decay rather than milliseconds or microseconds.



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by Nookster
 


I realize that in the bigger picture when we're talking artificial elements, a half second is "fairly stable", but fairly stable doesn't equate to useful outcomes beyond research of fairly stable atoms.

114, to me, is interesting from a milestone point of view, but these elements need to find real world uses before I get really excited and for that they need to be stable for years.



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Not by scientists, though. The myth about 50 mph or faster being lethal was really the class of opinion that gets thrown about on ATS all the time.



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by Nookster
 


It's all true.
Bob Lazar gave us about 95% of the truth.
He left out the Gravity Wave Caterpillar Drive.
Element 115 powers the matter/antimatter warp reactor.



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 08:02 PM
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[edit on 25-9-2009 by ghaleon12]



posted on Sep, 29 2009 @ 08:26 PM
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It is harmless.


No it isn't. That's like saying that a gun is harmless.

If used, a gun is certainly not harmless, and when used, neither is a tankround with a DU penetrator rod.

Upon impact, up to 70 percent of the DU penetrator rod is dissolved into a cloud of dust containing particles of DU which is then ingested by people and animals, causing lungcancer and tissue damage from radiation. It also sticks to clothes, brick and even metals. IAEA found high levels of radiation near destroyed iraqi armoured vehicles after gulf war II, and high levels of lung cancer, thyroid cancer and other deceases caused generally believed to be caused by radioactive fallout after DU was used by US forces. The same was found after the US had used A-10 to attack serbian armoured vehicles in the former yogoslavia, and also In Ukraine and Belorussia after the chernobyl incident in 1986.

So it is harmful.

[edit on 30-9-2009 by aaa2500]



posted on Sep, 29 2009 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by aaa2500
 


Bullets and knifes cause harm.

Depleted uranium is harmless.
No radiation.



posted on Sep, 29 2009 @ 09:43 PM
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reply to post by Eurisko2012
 

Yep , Bob s explanation of the gravity overlapping the heavy molecule and thus being able to be amplified always sounded true to me . Very interesting . Oppps heavy atom , that is)

[edit on 29-9-2009 by bluemooone2]



posted on Sep, 29 2009 @ 09:50 PM
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Originally posted by bluemooone2
reply to post by Eurisko2012
 

Yep , Bob s explanation of the gravity overlapping the heavy molecule and thus being able to be amplified always sounded true to me . Very interesting . Oppps heavy atom , that is)

[edit on 29-9-2009 by bluemooone2]


The key is the wave guide through the center.
I'll be glad when Element 115 and Artifical Gravity is installed
in a new and improved NASA Space Shuttle. No more floating
around when they achieve orbit.
The aliens must be laughing at us.
Why are they floating around on the space station?

Like my Avatar?



posted on Sep, 29 2009 @ 10:00 PM
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reply to post by bluemooone2
 


If you want gravity, you need static torque potentials, conversely,....

HADES



posted on Sep, 29 2009 @ 10:48 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
I can positively verify and support a stable nuclear weight sample of 115 WITHIN a positronic stability wave matrix plasmatic effect field....

Hang on....I got the patent somewhere.....

Nah!!!! Joking.


As bizarre as that sounds, it still sounds more credible than "It came from a galaxy far, far away where the laws of physics that apply here don't apply" or whatever the story was.


10 years seems like a long time to duplicate the Russian experiment so I'm guessing it's not easy to make this stuff.

If they ever figure out how to make this stuff stable, it sounds like it will be even denser than depleted uranium! Why are weapons the first applications we always seem to think of for new materials and technologies?



posted on Sep, 29 2009 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by Eurisko2012
Element 115 powers the matter/antimatter warp reactor.


Uh huh, if you had matter anti-matter available to you, why would you need anything else, that doesn't make any sense. That would be like using a fission reactor to power a hydro-electric dam.



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