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Record Hoard Of Ancient Gold Found In Field

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posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 07:37 AM
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Record Hoard Of Ancient Gold Found In Field


news.sky.com

12:42pm UK, Thursday September 24, 2009

An unemployed man has unearthed the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found with the help of his metal detector.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 07:37 AM
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I have been lucky enough to see the Sutton Hoo treasure in the British Museum and I think that some of the pieces found in this hoard look remarkably similar, especially the gold and garnet pieces.

It is thought that the Sutton Hoo find was the burial of king Redwald from the 7th century ( about the time of the Beowolf Saga )
This new find is being compared with Sutton Hoo and the Lindisfarne Chessmen in terms of importance - thank god for metal detectors eh?

It does make you wonder how much else lies buried from UKs ancient past.

news.sky.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 07:59 AM
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Let's hope that the guys receive a rewards worth it. I assume the ownership goes to the government automatically but they deserve a huge reward.



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by PsykoOps
 


The smart thing to do would have been to not tell anyone and then eventually sell it off piece by piece over time.


If you come into a large sum of money legally never tell others, especially the government.

On another note I would love to find something like this. I recall as a kid playing with a metal detector hoping to find some riches but the best I ever found was an old axe head.

Raist



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:17 AM
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If you sell it piece by piece changes are that they go to some private collection. I'd love to see this stuff in a museum instead.


+4 more 
posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:25 AM
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Wow! I love stuff like this! I've had a metal detector for years, and only in the past few years had access to a beach where I could find cool stuff. My best find was not worth a lot of money, but was very valuable in its own way. I found a sterling silver toe ring that said 'Aloha' on it, on a Canadian beach. This caused me to think of a friend that I had not e-mailed in a long time, who lives in Hawaii. I e-mailed her a picture of a sunrise that I had taken. The response I got was that she was just ready to 'turn the lights out, forever', but that the sunrise picture had given her hope to live another day. She's doing fine now, several months later. You can call it serendipity, I believe it was God-arranged.



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:29 AM
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It says clearly that the man will receive the hoard's worth in payment after its value is cataloged.

Funny how some here take quicker to recommending "theft" of historic finds, then they do to actually reading a full article.

It is a shame that the human race has lost so much of its dignity and self respect, that the majority takes to stealing before it even considers "history in the making".

And for what? Money...

HUGE booming Boo to you (he who offers advice on become a petty thief instead of historic hero).

Star and flag to the OP. Great story to read early in the morning.



[edit on 24-9-2009 by Mr Mask]



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:31 AM
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Originally posted by Raist
The smart thing to do would have been to not tell anyone and then eventually sell it off piece by piece over time.


No, that would not have been the samrt thing to do. That would have been the dishonest thing to do. He will be amply rewarded and the nation will benefit by having the hoard presented in such a way that it can be studied and preserved.

Regards



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by Mr Mask
 


Where does it say that? It says huge, but I doubt they get the full value.



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:40 AM
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reply to post by PsykoOps
 


From the article-

"Once a valuation and sale of the hoard have been completed, the market value of the find will go to Mr Herbert and the owner of the farmland where it was discovered."

(forgive me, I don't know much about quoting websites with that keen little box.)

It says it right there.



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:42 AM
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Oh, I must've skipped over that bit. 3 times
Let's hope they get what they deserve



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by Mr Mask
 


reply to post by paraphi
 


I was replying to the statement “Hopefully he will get a reward for the find”.

In the case one was not to get anything from it what makes it right for a country to steal what a citizen rightfully found? The man is in hard times (unemployed) I would assume that means he is running low on cash and could use some help. If he was not running low on cash he could have just kept it in a private collection or donated it to a museum.

Yeah it says both men will get a huge reward but is it enough to help the unemployed man? See he has to split that reward with the property owner. Which of course he could have done with the selling piece by piece as well.

I am willing to bet that they are going to get screwed over by the government in this one. This man and his friend deserve to get the full amount of it’s worth or it should not be removed from their possession period. If you want to learn about it fence up some cash so you can study it. The man is unemployed he needs help. A huge reward (how much ever that is) may not be enough to help. They should get full value or be left alone.

Raist



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:48 AM
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reply to post by ironorchid
 


That is awesome! Good for them - I am glad they will get to keep the money, instead of the govt. trying to take it, like they do when ships are found with gold.



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by Mr Mask
 


Okay in this case I retract my original statment.

I could care less for the state. I simply was thinking the two men should get the full value, I guess I missed that part.

Raist



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:50 AM
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Well the cash money is hardly the "only reward" to be had by this man.

Howard Carter went down in history and shall always be known by history and mankind for what he found.

The money will be nice indeed...but the legacy acquired, the feeling of self accomplishment and the end-all mother-of-all-discoveries-

Now THAT'S a reward.

That guy must see this as the greatest adventure in his life...if not the happiest.

I bet he can die satisfied the day the reaper comes collecting.



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by Mr Mask
 


Well speaking as a father and a husband I can say legacy is okay but it is money that puts food in my families belly.

If I were without a job and hoping to find some stuff worth money to feed my family I would be more concerned with feeding them than becoming well known for a find. That was the reasoning for my original statement. That and seeing how often the state screws over the little guy.

Raist



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:56 AM
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Originally posted by Mr Mask
It says clearly that the man will receive the hoard's worth in payment after its value is cataloged.

Funny how some here take quicker to recommending "theft" of historic finds, then they do to actually reading a full article.

It is a shame that the human race has lost so much of its dignity and self respect, that the majority takes to stealing before it even considers "history in the making".

And for what? Money...

HUGE booming Boo to you (he who offers advice on become a petty thief instead of historic hero).

Star and flag to the OP. Great story to read early in the morning.



[edit on 24-9-2009 by Mr Mask]


"theft" means that someone owns it and you stole it from them...this was no theft. this treasure was long ago lost, hundreds of years have gone by. the land where it was found, is now in clear title owned by someone else. if England wants it in their museums, they should pay the going rate.

and how can anyone tell who owned it. maybe at one time it was owned by royalty, but maybe that same royalty sold it to someone else for something, or gave it away for some reason. there can be no trace of ownership, unless there is documented proof of ownership year after year up until the present day.

and as far as "history in the making" F that...the wealthy have conned, coerced, and simply taken treasure themselves all down through history.
if the wealthy lords of that day wanted to take small pieces of gold or silver from peasents, they took it at the end of a sword by the use of their personal armies. F this royalty crap, nobody owes them anything.

[edit on 24-9-2009 by jimmyx]



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 08:57 AM
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The man is unemployed he needs help. A huge reward (how much ever that is) may not be enough to help. They should get full value or be left alone.


Again...let me be very clear with you. The article states-

"Once a valuation and sale of the hoard have been completed, the 'market value' of the find will go to Mr Herbert and the owner of the farmland where it was discovered."

Assuming you have no idea of gold's market value (since you mistake it's worth being "worth stealing" and trading in your morality for profit...let me assure you, this man will now be very very rich.

So...yeah...still a big huge booming BOO to your lack of morals and quickness towards advising theft over "adding to the human race's history".

won't begin to lecture you on the depravity it takes to rob "humanity as whole" the grand pleasure of seeing this in a museum.

As you said...you don't care about "the state"

I can't expect you to care about the entire world...or its history.

Never-mind your own worth over that of money.



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by Mr Mask
 


Well you should see my post right below the one you quoted.

But with what is said here I feel it is safe to say you have never been on hard times yourself? As for the ownership it belongs to the two men the one that found it and the land owner on which it was found. No one else is entitled to anything in this case aside from the two gentle men involved. No one else found it and it is on no one else’s land not mine or yours. Neither of us should get a right to say what happens to the find especially the government.

It belongs to no one else aside from those two people. What is on my land is mind and no one else’s unless they find it in which case it belongs to both of us.

Again though I covered that I missed they would get full value in the post below the one you quoted, I even retracted my original statement over it. But when it comes to survival of my family over the state gaining I am going to choose my family surviving to do otherwise is simply stupid.

Raist



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 09:14 AM
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good for him. this kind of thing is not a total surprise, especially given the region's long history.

reminds me of incidents of people finding gold, etc in the Florida/Bahamas region that was buried by pirates.

p.s.

it takes away from the information that the OP gives and the comments of responders to the thread when people start commenting on other poster's morales and values. personal judgements and attacks on others isn't what this board is supposed to be about



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