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E.Coli Can Be Used to Clean Up & Recycle Nuclear Waste

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posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 11:46 AM
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Well, this is big!

Although we have had the process since 1995, it relied on materials that were far more expensive than the Uranium and there was little reason to use it. Now that the process has been adapted using cheap inositol phosphate and E.Coli bacteria, it is not only cheap but practical. Considering there has become an extreme shortage of Uranium, and Nuclear Waste has been the bane of Nuclear Energy for decades, this is a boon.

Using Waste to Recover Uranium



Using bacteria and inositol phosphate, a chemical analogue of a cheap waste material from plants, researchers at Birmingham University have recovered uranium from the polluted waters from uranium mines. The same technology can also be used to clean up nuclear waste. Professor Lynne Macaskie, this week (7-10 September), presented the group's work to the Society for General Microbiology's meeting at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.

Bacteria, in this case, E. coli, break down a source of inositol phosphate (also called phytic acid), a phosphate storage material in seeds, to free the phosphate molecules. The phosphate then binds to the uranium forming a uranium phosphate precipitate on the bacterial cells that can be harvested to recover the uranium.


Although I'm not sure how comfortable I am with people playing around with E.Coli on that large of a scale.

However, if the alternative is to leave irradiated and polluted materials seeping into our groundwater and environment for the next 12 million years, it seems like a viable alternative. And since the process is now cheap...why not?




posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 11:50 AM
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Wasn't this theory came up with by a 14 year old student, I think it was it's an old thread on here posted a couple O times if I remember right.



posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 11:53 AM
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What a choice..
E coli to clean up nuclear waste to aid in the process of making more nuclear items.
Are we not just shape shifting?
The mental picture is almost too much to bear.
Controlling this environment would lay in the hands of whom??

Poison for poison.


Namaste

ZM



posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by fraterormus
Although I'm not sure how comfortable I am with people playing around with E.Coli on that large of a scale.

However, if the alternative is to leave irradiated and polluted materials seeping into our groundwater and environment for the next 12 million years, it seems like a viable alternative. And since the process is now cheap...why not?


This process does not clean up contaminated waste, it just serves in the recovery of the commodity of uranium ore. Which conceivably will be refined into higher grade plutonium and the like.

The materials in contact with the original uranium will still be contaminated with radiation until it dissipates to safe levels.



posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 12:01 PM
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Originally posted by Doc Holiday
Wasn't this theory came up with by a 14 year old student, I think it was it's an old thread on here posted a couple O times if I remember right.


The original process discovered back in 1995 very well might have been.

What makes this new discovery so vital, however, is the discovery that inositol phosphate and E.Coli is potentially six times more effective as the original process, as well as being a cheaply obtained waste material making the entire process economically viable.

You'd think that despite the higher cost of the original process discovered in 1995 we would have been utilizing it. However, uranium had been so cheap that it wasn't an issue. Now that world+dog is developing Nuclear Energy to reduce carbon output and reliance on foreign oil, uranium is sky-rocketing in price and becoming more difficult to come by. It's sad that it comes down to a matter of economics, but cleaning up the environment by reducing irradiated waste is just an after-thought only when it's convenient and economically viable.



posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by clay2 baraka
This process does not clean up contaminated waste, it just serves in the recovery of the commodity of uranium ore. Which conceivably will be refined into higher grade plutonium and the like.

The materials in contact with the original uranium will still be contaminated with radiation until it dissipates to safe levels.


Actually it can clean up contaminated waste water and soil according to the presentation of the research team that this article is about.

Microbial Biomineralization Processes (pdf)



Microbial bioremediation of nuclear and industrial wastes
Some micro-organisms can accumulate heavy metals and this may be of use in the remediation of contaminated streams and soils. We are looking at the underlying biochemical and chemical mechanisms of this, and using immobilised cells and biofilms for biodegradation of wastes and pollutants.



posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 12:09 PM
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Thats all we need ... radioactive bacteria.


Another helpful suggestion : Add E. Coli to your favorite beverage, for a delicious and nutritious drink !!!!



posted on Sep, 22 2009 @ 02:19 PM
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I'm sure everyone knows this but you all know you have butt loads of E. Coli in your stomach and intestines right now right? You do know you couldn't survive without em right?

Just checking!



posted on Sep, 23 2009 @ 12:55 PM
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Originally posted by Doc Holiday
Wasn't this theory came up with by a 14 year old student, I think it was it's an old thread on here posted a couple O times if I remember right.


Pretty sure that was about a bacteria that breaks down plastic. Also pretty revolutionary.

Or about the kid who invented 100% more effective solar panels. Take your pick



posted on Sep, 23 2009 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by fraterormusAlthough I'm not sure how comfortable I am with people playing around with E.Coli on that large of a scale.


E. coli is the main type of bacterium populating your lower intestines. You will, at any given time, have untold trillions living inside your body. Only a few specific strains have any infectious properties. All human beings will have been colonized by E.Coli bacterium by the time they're about two or three days old. It's very natural. If you kill off your body's bacterial fauna, such as when taking strong antibiotics to treat some specific illness, your overall wellness can suffer, as you have a sort of symbiosis with the many bacterial organisms that live in your body (you can live without them, but they help you break down food, as well as other stuff).

Essentially: it's mostly harmless stuff, and the harmful strains have to be ingested for them to do anything.

Moral: even if this stuff mutated to become infectious after exposure to ionizing radiation, unless you have a habit of eating radioactive waste, it's probably not a problem for you.



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