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Baltimore Cop uses 'Perps' as ATM

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posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 02:11 PM
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Poor guy. A four year veteran of the Baltimore PD was busted by one of his own that was posing as a drug dealer. The cop had apparently been 'shaking down' folks and helping himself to their cash.

www.baltimoresun.com...


Michael Sylvester, 29, was arrested Thursday morning after he stole $70 from the undercover officer in the 3900 block of Carlisle Ave. in Northwest Baltimore as part of what the department refers to as an integrity test, according to Anthony Guglielmi, the department's chief spokesman....

Sylvester, a four-year veteran, had been recently transferred from the Central District's Pennsylvania Avenue task force after police received numerous complaints that he was stealing cash from suspected drug dealers, Guglielmi said. The area is regarded as one of the largest drug marketplaces on the East Coast.


Ok...just to be a pain in the rump on this one...take a look at this quote:


Guglielmi said rooting out corrupt officers is a top priority of Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III.


And then this tidbit...


n August 2008, city Officer Jerome K. Hill was acquitted on charges of assault stemming from an incident in which he punched an undercover internal affairs detective during an integrity test in January 2008. Circuit Judge John C. Themelis said he could not second-guess the instincts of the officer and that he might have had good reason to act aggressively.


The judge says he couldn't really 'second-guess' the cop and why he would hit an undercover internal affairs officer during a previous 'ethics test.' He was acquitted and let back in to his job of ripping people off.

So, it took them a while, but they finally got him off the force....well for now. Who knows if he will be acquitted of these charges too and back in a couple weeks making withdrawals from the fine citizens of Baltimore.




posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 02:26 PM
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When the police make rooting out corrupt officers a top priority that is a very good thing. It goes to show you how deep the rabbit hole really goes, but acknowledging the problem and taking proactive steps to regain integrity is something that does need to be applauded.

Unfortunately, just as Teachers suspected of sexual misconduct with their students, all a LEO discharged for breaking the law has to do is apply at another precinct in another county or state to get hired back doing what they were doing, and it is business as usual for them.

I always thought that LEOs were not above the law, that if found guilty of wrong-doing that the same laws applied to them, not just the administrative sentences of their superior officers and Internal Affairs. Why isn't the District Attorney bringing charges against them?

I applaud the Baltimore PD's attempt to root out corruption in their precinct. However, their response is only making their corruption problem become someone else's corruption problem, rather than truly solving the problem by making examples of these bad apples and throwing the book at them and tossing away the key.



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 03:02 PM
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reply to post by fraterormus
 





I always thought that LEOs were not above the law, that if found guilty of wrong-doing that the same laws applied to them, not just the administrative sentences of their superior officers and Internal Affairs.


I find myself wondering this same point often. When probation for stealing 200 thousand bucks, or two weeks vacation for lying that results in someone's death, or false imprisonment is the standard fare for cops, there is pretty big line between the 'justice' that a citizen is subject to and that which a LEO is.

Seems a bit unbalanced to me.



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 11:55 PM
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Originally posted by KSPigpen
reply to post by fraterormus
 





I always thought that LEOs were not above the law, that if found guilty of wrong-doing that the same laws applied to them, not just the administrative sentences of their superior officers and Internal Affairs.


I find myself wondering this same point often. When probation for stealing 200 thousand bucks, or two weeks vacation for lying that results in someone's death, or false imprisonment is the standard fare for cops, there is pretty big line between the 'justice' that a citizen is subject to and that which a LEO is.

Seems a bit unbalanced to me.


That's the whole entire point of having a police state.

Make the state better for the corrupt police.



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