Adventures In PRIME NUMBER Land !!! ... (A Dummies Guide to Prime Numbers)

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posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 12:50 PM
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Cool stuff. I played around with primes a few times, as a computer programmer, it's always been one of those pissing contests that newbies and oldies alike have, fastest sieve, and other prime based challenges. the 6n+- relationship was one that astounded me first time I saw it, I always wanted to tie it into some of the other optimizations I had on basic sieves, but it seemed to be best left alone, bolting more 'tricks' on after that always seemed to make things worse for me, not better!

Whenever I start to learn a new programming language, doing a few sieves is always part of that first experimentation to find the idioms and and basic features.

I wish I could really understand some of the more complex methods, and more about primes in general but it tends to get into elbow patch and long beard territory pretty quickly.

Thanks for the post, it had me in about equal parts "Aha!", and then lots of head scratching.




posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 01:13 PM
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Great thread, Even I could understand it. AMAZING!

thanks for posting.

p.s.
Probably just a typo, but should this be Circle 71, Ray1?

Lets use the following prime numbers to illustrate this effect ... 41, 1009 and 10007.

1. 41 x 41 = 1681
2. 1681 / 24 = 70.0416666666666 (repeating)
3. 70 + 1 = 72
4. 0.0416666666666 x 24 = 1

Therefore, 1681 (41 squared) is on Circle 72, Ray1



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 02:55 PM
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Intresting thread took me a second to figure out what you were talking about with rays & 24. I believe it will help me in the future.
I'll be sure to read all the rest of your posts later.
Math really isn't that big of a pain to learn.

[edit on 20-9-2009 by Brsn90]



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 03:29 PM
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Every 33rd note in the Pythagorean musical scale increases in pitch by a factor of 24, where
33 = 1! + 2! + 3! + 4!
and
24 = 1x2x3x4.

24 is the 10th overtone, where
10 = 1 + 2 + 3 + 4
is the sum of the first four integers and
24 = 3 + 5 + 7 + 9
is the sum of the first four odd integers after 1.

The number of non-zero roots of the superstring gauge symmetry group E8 is
240 = 24x10 = 1x2x3x4(1+2+3+4).
1680 = 7x240 = 3 + 5 + 7 +...+ 81
is the sum of the first 40 odd integers after 1, where
40 = 4x(1+2+3+4) = 4 + 8 + 12 + 16
is the sum of the first integers that start with 4 and are 4 units apart.

There are 168 primes below 1000, where
1000 = (1+2+3+4)(1^3 + 2^3 + 3^3 + 4^3) = (1+2+3+4)^3.

If you want to understand the significance of the numbers 168 and 1680 in relation to superstring structure and dynamics, how they are embodied in sacred geometries and are connected to the Pythagorean musical scale, study the 51 research articles (downloadable PDFs) at
smphillips.8m.com...

It's the "Area 51" of sacred geometry.



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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Hi man, I like the work you've put into this. I was testing it out however, by trying random numbers to use instead of 24, and found that 8 may be a better number. The reason is that using the differences in primes you can create the entire 8th ray (8,16,24,32), and that it also includes 3.

ie. 24n becomes 8n. plus it works out better for the lower numbers, 3^2 - 1^2 = 8, 5^2 -3^2 = 16, etc. that don't actually work with 24.

These are just my thoughts so far, when I have more time to look at other aspects of the idea I'll post them.

Peace for now



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 05:36 PM
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finding unknown primes can also be pretty lucrative


I wonder if your system would help find some of these...



EFF Cooperative Computing Awards
$100,000 to the first individual or group who discovers a prime number with at least 10,000,000 decimal digits
$150,000 to the first individual or group who discovers a prime number with at least 100,000,000 decimal digits
$250,000 to the first individual or group who discovers a prime number with at least 1,000,000,000 decimal digits



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 05:54 PM
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That all looks very intreasting.Now lets see why the number 297 is very unique. Lets take the number 132 13+32+23+31=99
99 99+99 =198
198 19+98+89+91=297
297 29+97+79+92=297

In this formula with any number between 11 to 999 you will always end up with the number 297.Does anyone know why this occures like this.I discovered this over 10 years ago.

[edit on 20-9-2009 by GORGANTHIUM]



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 06:00 PM
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I have been playing around with your idea and just thought I'd point out something I noticed.

Ray '1' and Ray '13', (the same line continuing through the center of the circles) appear to contain ALL the so called "Star numbers". (Both Prime and Non-Prime)

Although, I have only checked up to the 452nd circle (10837)... infinity is a bit too far for me!



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 06:47 PM
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Very well done. I must turn you towards a video called "The Secret Of the Universe." Its a very well done vid explaining Ed. Leedskanlin's Mysterious Coral Castle and the codes he left behind. It has to do with Prime numbers and prime Sequence. Thanks again for the post.

The Universe can be describes simply as 110100100101000100101011001.......



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by bonaire
Does all this apply to only the base-10 number system or can the circles be transferred to octal, hexidecimal or other base number systems? Also, consider base-24 and see if it works there too.


Thats a very interesting question and truthfully, it never even occured to me to consider the possibility of using different base number systems.

Primes are obviously a base-10 phenomena and I'm not even sure if there's a "prime number equivalent" in any other base ... now you've got me thinking ... well done !





Do primes correspond to anything such as the golden mean or golden ratio? Just wondering how prime numbers can help humanity better understand ourselves.


As far as I know, there's no direct link or correspondence.
If anyone can supply further info indicating that there is in fact a link, I'd be very interested in reading up on it.



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by MickC
 




Probably just a typo, but should this be Circle 71, Ray1?


Darn !!! Yes, it IS a typo and you're correct ... just goes to show that no matter how many times I proof read before posting, errors still sneak through


Good catch, MickC



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 08:13 PM
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Originally posted by grizzedram
Hi man, I like the work you've put into this. I was testing it out however, by trying random numbers to use instead of 24, and found that 8 may be a better number. The reason is that using the differences in primes you can create the entire 8th ray (8,16,24,32), and that it also includes 3.

ie. 24n becomes 8n. plus it works out better for the lower numbers, 3^2 - 1^2 = 8, 5^2 -3^2 = 16, etc. that don't actually work with 24.

These are just my thoughts so far, when I have more time to look at other aspects of the idea I'll post them.

Peace for now


Using 8 may work as well and I intend to test it out as soon as I get a bit of time ... will be interesting to compare to the 24 version.

In the meantime, please let me know if you find anything of significant interest.

Also very pleased to see that this thread has started people coming up with related points of interest



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 08:26 PM
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Originally posted by candide
finding unknown primes can also be pretty lucrative


I wonder if your system would help find some of these...



EFF Cooperative Computing Awards
$100,000 to the first individual or group who discovers a prime number with at least 10,000,000 decimal digits
$150,000 to the first individual or group who discovers a prime number with at least 100,000,000 decimal digits
$250,000 to the first individual or group who discovers a prime number with at least 1,000,000,000 decimal digits


Believe me, the thought had definitely crossed my mind !

Obviously you can extend ANY of the 8 rays indefinitely and be GUARANTEED that they will contain primes in EXCESS of 10,000,000 or 100,000,000 or even 1,000,000,000 digits ... that's the easy part.

The hard part comes when you select what looks like a promising prime number candidate from one of those rays and then have to PROVE DEFINITIVELY that is in fact a prime.

But I'll certainly be looking further into this aspect ... after all, SOMEONE has to eventually win one or more of those prizes !



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 08:45 PM
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Originally posted by MickC
I have been playing around with your idea and just thought I'd point out something I noticed.

Ray '1' and Ray '13', (the same line continuing through the center of the circles) appear to contain ALL the so called "Star numbers". (Both Prime and Non-Prime)

Although, I have only checked up to the 452nd circle (10837)... infinity is a bit too far for me!



MickC ... you are doing well !!

I wasn't even aware of "Star numbers" until you mentioned it just now.

I've also done some initial fact finding and tend to agree with you it looks as if "potentially" EVERY Star Number including the Star Primes will ONLY be found along the ray1 / ray13 axis ... now how interesting is that !!!

Got to admit that I find it simply amazing that something I wasn't even looking at (Star Numbers) inexplicably all of a sudden turn up in the work I'm doing on primes ... talk about an unexpected but welcome surprise

Definitely will be looking further into that aspect



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 09:20 PM
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This is my first reply, so I want to make it as best as m I can. This post was great for anybody looking to find real truth that can't be argued. I'm not saying this is it, but at least you are looking, and contributing more than almost everybody. I am not a very smart man(not really sure why I looked at a math thread- but i do love math, just not on anybody intelligent's level), but I do love anything that will help me. I hope to hear anything from you in the future. The graph helped me explain primes to my daughtger and myself! I don't know who you are, but you are a great help to anyone looking. Thank you for your insight into things that have an explanation but not many care about the practical implications thereof.... I do. Thanks again.

Oh yeah,, Star and Flag.


[edit on 20-9-2009 by eazyriderl_l]



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 09:29 PM
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That is very interesting...



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 09:50 PM
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Originally posted by eazyriderl_l
This is my first reply, so I want to make it as best as m I can. This post was great for anybody looking to find real truth that can't be argued. I'm not saying this is it, but at least you are looking, and contributing more than almost everybody. I am not a very smart man(not really sure why I looked at a math thread- but i do love math, just not on anybody intelligent's level), but I do love anything that will help me. I hope to hear anything from you in the future. The graph helped me explain primes to my daughtger and myself! I don't know who you are, but you are a great help to anyone looking. Thank you for your insight into things that have an explanation but not many care about the practical implications thereof.... I do. Thanks again.

Oh yeah,, Star and Flag.


[edit on 20-9-2009 by eazyriderl_l]


Thank you very much for those kind words ... believe me, I certainly do appreciate them


I'm also pleased that in my small way I've been able to help you and especially your daughter to get a better grip on some basic maths concepts. Having 2 boys of my own, I know just how difficult it can be to get kids motivated, let alone interested, in maths ... so every little bit helps !

Prime numbers may not be the "sexiest" maths out there but without them we'd probably not have many things that we take for granted e.g. electronic banking, internet, credit cards, etc, etc



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 10:41 PM
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great thread SNF!!!!

love it and will enjoy reading through it later tonight.



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by SoundTheory
I must turn you towards a video called "The Secret Of the Universe." Its a very well done vid explaining Ed. Leedskanlin's Mysterious Coral Castle and the codes he left behind. It has to do with Prime numbers and prime Sequence.



Interesting video. Too bad it says nothing of how to apply the ideas that it presents.

Simply put, it is a bunch of games, with numbers, but without purpose. No where in the video does it say HOW he built that castle. If I missed it, at what minute & second in the video was it explained HOW he built it? The flywheel did....what? What moved what, where and how did it do it?

SoundTheory, I put it to you that the human mind is so good at finding patterns that when it can find none, it starts to make them up, souring the results.

As demonstrated in that video, and in this thread.

And sorry to the OP, I don't buy the impressive numeric gymnastics.

Nice try, though.



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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1. 41 x 41 = 1681
2. 1681 / 24 = 70.0416666666666 (repeating)
3. 70 + 1 = 72
4. 0.0416666666666 x 24 = 1

Really?

edit:
Nevermind looks like someone already covered that. But awesome post I will have to come back to this again!

[edit on 20-9-2009 by way2slo]





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