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Muscadine grapes

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posted on Sep, 19 2009 @ 06:10 PM
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This is more of an observation than anything else. As it is about a 'nature' food, I thought that this category was as appropriate as any other.

In North Carolina, Muscadines (native grape) ripen in roughly mid-August, with some adjustment for altitude. However, here in the Foothills, they have only ripened in the last week or so. Curiously, we have been picking persimmons for over two weeks. (I have never found the 'frost required for palatability' wives' tale to be accurate.) Both the Muscadine and Persimmon 'crops' seem very heavy this year, as are the mast crops. Perhaps the relatively wet and mild summer contributed. There is no conspiracy seen here, as noted, merely observation of Nature's 'U-Pick' opportunities.

There is something satisfying about taking the kids out into the woods and teaching them what to look for to find the 'free' foods.




posted on Sep, 19 2009 @ 10:54 PM
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Being in NC myself, I enjoyed your post. It was nice to read of your peaceful experiences with your children. The lack of mystery and conspiracy was a nice surprise. Peace to you and yours from a fellow North Carolinian. Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina.



posted on Sep, 19 2009 @ 11:04 PM
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ANOTHER CAROLINA BOY HERE! AND YES, THE GRAPES ARE PLENTIFUL. I HAVE SCUPPERNONG VINES AND THEY ARE LOADED. NOT A CLUSTER GRAPE, THERE ARE LITERALLY GOBS OF GRAPES ON THE VINES. IT IS EITHER THE MILD AND WET WEATHER, OR WE ARE IN FOR A ROUGH WINTER. NATURE GENERALLY TAKES CARE OF ITS OWN, AND BASED ON MY COUNTRY WAYS, THE SIGNS ARE THERE... A COLD WINTER.



posted on Sep, 19 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by Viking04
 


Mmmmm, muscadine wine....love the stuff! I make some very good wine with these grapes, and I could eat them all day! Going out to get them is a lot of fun, and you are right, they are in abundance this year!



posted on Sep, 19 2009 @ 11:20 PM
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Oh! I just finished eating a big bowl of these!! They are truly loaded in NC this year, you're right! I bought some from a grower nearby, and they are some of the BIGGEST and best I've ever had..


Bitter cold winter ahead??..

I'm already wrapped up!

- Mea

[edit on 19-9-2009 by Veritas Lux Mea]



posted on Sep, 19 2009 @ 11:31 PM
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There was a time when pecan trees were planted along roadsides in Georgia. The trees were there for the passers-by and maybe others in the neighborhood.

Sadly, some people got greedy. Took more than their share and started selling them. Farmers got angry. Local gov. decided to cut all the trees down. No more free pecans.

In days of old, it was a rule that whatever hangs over the fence belongs to the passers-by. It would be nice if we could return to that again. If people would respect it and not become greedy. If all would cooperate so that these principles could be used as they were meant to be.

Just think what it could be like if everyone planted even just one type of vegetable in a 4 by 8 spot in their front yard. Or a crop of peas or squash to trail up and over the fence. Can you imagine a neighborhood where everyone does this and shares with each other?

Muskadine grapes. Yes, I remember them fondly. But be careful. There are usually yellow jackets around!



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 06:04 PM
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Around North Alabama the fig trees are booming.

That, and my neighbor's okra plants won't stop producing.

She got so tired of her nonstop zucchini and yellow squash that she uprooted them.



posted on Sep, 20 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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Mmmmm. I ♥ muscadine jelly.

I remember my grandfather's friend used to share some every year. I wish I knew more about canning and such.

I agree with the poster above - cold winter - and I'll add, with an early frost.



[edit on 20/9/2009 by kosmicjack]



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 02:41 PM
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Gotta admit that I didn't know what a muscadine was until I lived in the greater Charlotte NC area a number of years ago. Good Stuff.

When I lived in the mountains of central VA I was shown a prime and highly secret area to pick wild blueberries. Those things were nearly the size of my thumb tip. We just had to be on constant black bear watch when we were picking. They love them too!!



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 07:01 PM
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I agree with the posters above that this winter will likely be a rough one here. The 'signs' seem to indicate it. I don't have any scientific basis to back this up, but our grandparents and those who came before them spent more time out of doors. (Even in some of their homes, they were practically outdoors.) Also, they had more time to observe their surroundings, as well as less 'noise' distracting them, as this internet thing distracts us.

Kosmicjack, if you are interested in canning, you may want to contact your county Extension office. They are generally thought of as agriculture and horticulture only, but many still have what were called 'Home Extension Agents'. They can teach canning, freezing, as well as food savings and preparation. I know that many of my posts sound like ads for the Extension service, but they are a wealth of hands on, teaching and printed information, particularly useful for various levels of survival. Also, the Extension office often also acts as a clearing house for clubs, Homemaking (canning, quilting), Gardening, Bee-keeping, Husbandry, as well as the 4-H (GREAT for the kids). Check them out, the info we want and need is there for the asking.



posted on Sep, 21 2009 @ 07:07 PM
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Acorns are everywhere. The amount of acorns this year that was produced has been the most I've ever seen. My mother said this is a sign of a hard winter coming. I don't know if that is a old wise tale or not. She might be right.



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