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What Is Gallium At 110 ppm Doing In Phoenix Air Samples

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posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 09:26 AM
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The latest Phoenix air analysis is finding Gallium in high concentrations. Gallium?

Gallium is very odd to find in ambient air, it is not actually found in the natural environment...

Not only that but other elements are way above healthy levels.
What the heck is going on in Phoenix?

Phoenix Air Particulates Lab Report - 2009
d1027732.mydomainwebhost.com...

What is Gallium and what is it used for?

Gallium is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol Ga and atomic number 31.

A rare, soft silvery metallic poor metal, gallium is a brittle solid at low temperatures but liquefies slightly above room temperature and indeed will melt in the hand.

It occurs in trace amounts in bauxite and zinc ores.

An important application is in the compound gallium arsenide, used as a semiconductor, most notably in light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

Elemental gallium is not found in nature, but it is easily obtained by smelting.
Here's a wikipedia entry on Gallium: en.wikipedia.org...

Would you be surprised to learn that amongst other things, it is used in cloaking technology?

Don't take my word for it, please read the Berkley research paper on it:

An optical cloak made of dielectrics
xlab.me.berkeley.edu...

Lots more on Gallium and cloaking technology here

What else can it be used for?

Because of it wide liquid temperature range gallium finds uses for high-temperature thermometers. It is used as a wetting agent in tin-lead solders, which also decreases the solders susceptibility to oxidation.

Gallium is used as an electron carrier in silicon semiconductors. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is used as a semiconductor and in rectifiers that operate at temperatures to 316°C (600°F). Gallium arsenide is capable of converting electricity directly into coherent light. It is also used in lenses in CO2 laser systems.

As an alloying agent to reduce the melting point of the alloy.

Magnesium gallate containing divalent impurities such as Mn2+ is finding use in commercial ultraviolet activated powders phosphors.

Gallium selenide (GaSe) and gallium triiodide (GaI3) are used on electronic applications.
www.azom.com...

Some side effects of Gallium exposure:

While not considered toxic, the data about gallium are inconclusive. Some sources suggest that it may cause dermatitis from prolonged exposure; other tests have not caused a positive reaction. Like most metals, finely divided gallium loses its luster and powdered gallium appears gray. Thus, when gallium is handled with bare hands, the extremely fine dispersion of liquid gallium droplets, which results from wetting skin with the metal, may appear as a gray skin stain.

Source

Funny enough...

According to the USGS.GOV website

Gallium is not produced in the United States, and demand is satisfied by imports, primarily high-purity material from France and low-purity material from Kazakhstan and Russia.
minerals.usgs.gov...

So why is there more Gallium found in Phoenix than most other places?




posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 09:33 AM
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Lasers and cloaking?

Interesting.
*



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 09:41 AM
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I think your last citation may provide a clue. Although some may gravitate to the more 'exotic' explanations, my guess is that this is residue from a manufacturing process --- if not locally then possibly coming from Russia carried on high altitude air currents. Given the relatively lax environmental controls in Russia they could be spewing huge amounts of this material into the atmosphere.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 09:52 AM
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Originally posted by jtma508
I think your last citation may provide a clue. Although some may gravitate to the more 'exotic' explanations, my guess is that this is residue from a manufacturing process --- if not locally then possibly coming from Russia carried on high altitude air currents. Given the relatively lax environmental controls in Russia they could be spewing huge amounts of this material into the atmosphere.


Yes, but this article discovered high levels of gallium in ARIZONA, not the entire continental United States. If it were found everywhere in the same concentration your theory might work.

Edited yet another typo.

[edit on 18-9-2009 by Hazelnut]



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 09:58 AM
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Originally posted by Hazelnut

Originally posted by jtma508
I think your last citation may provide a clue. Although some may gravitate to the more 'exotic' explanations, my guess is that this is residue from a manufacturing process --- if not locally then possibly coming from Russia carried on high altitude air currents. Given the relatively lax environmental controls in Russia they could be spewing huge amounts of this material into the atmosphere.


Yes, but this article discovered hight levels of gallium in ARIZONA, not the entire continental United States. If it were found everywhere in the same concentration your theory might work.


I agree. This is an interesting find.

You know the old saying, "Where there is Gallium in the air, there is something unique flying locally".

Okay... that's actually a new saying.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 10:02 AM
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If I knew where the air samples were taken I might be able to rule out the local maufacturing businesses.
The businesses by law (1986 community right to know act) have to file a Tier III (chemical inventory report) and they send a copy of it to the local emergency response center (and state). Find them and ask them. If they can't tell you because they have no record then suspect someone doing backyard smelting or a Gvn't coverup.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 


Maybe. But that can only be ascertained if we could compare air sample reports from all over the western U.S. taken at roughly the same time. The fact that Phoenix showed elevated levels doesn't mean other areas did not. Just sayin.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 10:24 AM
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S/F as a pack my bags leaving Phoenix.


I hadn't heard about this but I can promise that this has something to do with Luke Air Force Base



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 10:42 AM
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news.uns.purdue.edu...

Is ASU or the 'Pheonix Project' following Purdue's research on hydrogen production?

Just did a quick search but didn't find anything that was up to date.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 10:45 AM
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We have a lot of Semiconductor and Electronics manufacturing in the Phoenix Metro Area. To name a few, Intel, On Semiconductor, Freescale, Sun, AMD, Maxim, and quite a few other really large manufacturers of Semiconductors and circuit boards of all sorts. That would be my "rational" guess but I could be wrong seeing as how I don't know any of the science behind it. I do know that a lot more people here have respiratory problems than other places I have been. Don't know if that is one of the causes or not...



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 10:50 AM
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Originally posted by geo1066
news.uns.purdue.edu...

Is ASU or the 'Pheonix Project' following Purdue's research on hydrogen production?

Just did a quick search but didn't find anything that was up to date.


I found this amazing statement in your link.



"This technology is feasible for commercial use," Woodall said. "The waste alumina can be recycled back into aluminum, and low-cost gallium is available as a waste product from companies that produce aluminum from the raw mineral bauxite. Enough aluminum exists in the United States to produce 100 trillion kilowatt hours of energy. That's enough energy to meet all the U.S. electric needs for 35 years. If impure gallium can be made for less than $10 a pound and used in an onboard system, there are enough known gallium reserves to run 1 billion cars."



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 11:14 AM
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Maybe this is why all the people drive crazy down here?


I have been here for 3 years and I am not a big fan of the area...what do the other residents think?



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by Hazelnut
 


Good catch!
I like it when people bother to read linked content.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 11:31 AM
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There are diode-producing factories in Phoenix.
phoenix-az.yellowusa.com...
but Gallium is not harmless , so it should be solved.
books.google.co.il...,plant&source=bl&ots=45EIzDNnLl&sig=yIw8Fe9G66zuW2IDCod_vrunlTc&h l=iw&ei=26uzSurNG8b5_Ab9_cDBDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5#v=onepage&q=gallium%20waste%2Cplant&f=false



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by warrenb
 



3rd generation Phoenix native ... Motorola 52 St. and McDowell Rd. uses tons of the stuff [Ga] ... diagionally across the street is the Az National Guard.

Top secret underground command and control structures 6 stories that I am aware of ... maybe more now.

08NOV73 7:05 MST I broke my left leg on the "deepest" excavation where there was a wall with 12" dia elec. stub outs, 30 to 40 of them. I was stripping ceiling forms when I went down through the scaffold and got to watch my left leg do a 360 around the bottom rung of the scaffold when all the plywood that was above me hit. Luck of the draw ... I had an excellent orthopedic surgeon ... he saved my leg ...

Motorola has several more secret and not so secret sites in Tempe and Mesa also ... would you like to know about the many hundreds of gallons that they pumped into the Phoenix aquifer ... why has the EPA covered all this contamination up ??? $$$ talks ... bs walks ...

You should explore the other "exotic" elements that Motorola has dumped into the Phoenix environment ...

If you want a real thrill ... take a giger counter into Fry's Food Market or Basaha's Food Stores [Mormon connection] and walk up and down the isles. You may get a real supprise.

In 1982 I took a "dumbell physics" class at ASU ... from the late Rata Roy ... amoung other things he tought us how to make radioactive things non radioactive ... we tested the background radiation in Tempe at 17 to 18 counts per minute ... some one should check that level again ... he he ha ha ...

2nd line ... Corporate NAZI AmeriKa gets away with what they want because they have the $$$ and of course it is a "National Insecurity Issue"!!!



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by digitus impudicus
 


Correction ... hundreds of thousands of gallons of trichloroethylene ...

2nd line ... help I do not know how to go back into a response and correct typos and grammer ... like The Wizzard of Oz said to Dorthy ... "I don't know how it works"!!!



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 05:19 PM
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Wow. Thank goodness for you - pointing this out.
I'm up on the latest air sample that they completed and it IS extraordinary - I hadn't learned yet about this particular chemical.
Thanks again!



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by digitus impudicus
 


wow, glad they could save your leg

thanks for the details on the base!



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 05:45 PM
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I am amazed, and jaw dropped at this find; excellent job w.b.

Now I am reading about the secret installations in Phoenix??? I demand a debunker come forth to call us all nuts!!!


This echoes Military Industrial Complex. I just wonder whether this is simple careless pollution, or orchestrated chemical testing. My answer of course would be orchestrated testing on the human populace.

S&F



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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Is there a semiconductor manufacturer in Phoenix? I would look for manufacturers first who are polluting the air.



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