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Freemasonry : Concept of God

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posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 04:06 PM
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I'm curious about the Freemason aspect of God, as Freemasons, do you all have to follow some form of popular religious dogma that defines God?

What concept of God does freemasonry teach if any?

I'm not religious in the sense that I believe that the God(s) of men is/are the creator(s) of the universe, but I am developing my own views based on various ancient beliefs that predate monotheism that I am finding many remarkable parallels to what is currently being discovered by the sciences.

I would be called an atheist for lack of belief in the God(s) of men, and with discussing my thoughts with masons on the askamason forum I've been told my views "aren't good enough" so to speak. So, basically is the requirement in need to have a belief in one of the popular mainstream concepts of deity?




posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by sirnex
 


The only real religious requirement in Freemasonry is the belief in a Supreme Being. We won't tell you what to call your god; we're not going to get into pissing matches over who's god is better. Keeping with the idea that an omnipotent force exists and created the universe, we refer to him by the generic term "Grand Architect of the Universe." Why? We figure God at the very minimum created existence. We're not going to waste time debating evolution or whether God has any direct hand in the life of man, or anything like that either. There are plenty of Deists who are Masons, as well as plenty of devout followers of particular faiths and beliefs.

There is no dogma or set of beliefs that Masonry imposes upon its members. It encourages those members who go to church to keep active in their churches. If you personally don't follow any organized religion, that's OK too. Nobody's going to think any less of you.

It is generally accepted in abstract terms that there is some form of afterlife. Again, no specifics. Not our place to tell you where you're going, or the letter of the law required to get you there. We'll suggest ways to be a better man, to lead a life that makes a positive mark on those around you.

I might have more specifics in a bit, but that's the gist.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 04:41 PM
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In order to become a mason you have to believe in a higher power. A person of just about any religion can become a mason. I consider myself buddhist, a lot of masons are christian, and a lot are just "spiritual" or of other religions.


[edit on 16-9-2009 by jeasahtheseer]



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 09:16 PM
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Thing is, the way I've come to understand the universe is that there is no higher intelligent being that created the universe for the sake of mankind.

This has been my largest stumbling block with the people I've discussed this with.

I believe in a prime cause, but not that this cause is intelligent nor caring of mankind. I can't find a way to justify attributing a humanized emotional deity as being the creator when man is error prone in what he thinks he knows. I submit that something must have created the universe, whatever that prime cause just didn't do it out of want or need to lead up to man on earth. It seems too arrogant to believe that much. Yet when I explained my belief, what I view to be truth, I'm told there's no place for me in masonry.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by sirnex
Thing is, the way I've come to understand the universe is that there is no higher intelligent being that created the universe for the sake of mankind.
Who said it had to be for the sake of mankind? Food for thought...



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 11:19 PM
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I understand the concept of deism, however where I think I'm having the trouble with the masons I was talking to was the belief that whatever force was not an intelligent creative force as depicted by most belief systems.

Deists still believe in a one god as the creator of all, but not necessarily in the biblical sense. This is where I differ from deism. I do not believe the creation to be of divinity of any deity, a universe created without a god, but not necessarily either from an atheistic viewpoint.

It's confusing even for myself as I'm still in the processing of learning an developing my musings on the subject. I'm neither die hard religious nor scientist. I take both sides with great skepticism and I pretty much don't believe what either side says about the creation of the universe. I think it's to arrogant to say one can know the answer to that question or to claim what they believe to know is the truth and fact.

For this belief of mine, the masons I talked to said I would have no place in a lodge. That people like me would feel uncomfortable due to the subtle religious undertones of the rituals. Like I said, I'm neither atheist nor agnostic nor spiritualist. I'm not sure how to categorize and label myself at this point.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 11:19 PM
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After reading Pike, Hall and Blavatsky I've come to the belief that the God reffered to by Masons as the Grand Architect is the engineer of what we call reality. He made the plans, drew the blueprint, set the tempo, and continues on as Conductor. Though he conducts the Law of Matter he does not interfere. Would that not show dout in his Laws?

As you can probobly tell im a musician and have added musical terms to others ideas. another reason God is not defined so clearly in masonry is that the Student is meant to OutShine His Teacher. thereby building upon the concept of God. He is the source of all matter, intelligence, and spirit.

note: this is what I belive Mason's believe.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 11:23 PM
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Would you really want to join them even after telling you your belief's " aren't good enough " ???

... and if their not, ... just lie, say your catholic, those guys never go to church anyways.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 11:28 PM
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I don't plan on joining anymore, just trying to get a deeper understanding as to why what I believed would in a sense disbar me from joining based on what they were telling me.



posted on Sep, 17 2009 @ 12:39 AM
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Dude, I had to leave Freemasonry due to my changing beliefs. I am no longer a deist and, unfortunately, this means that I am not in line with the tenets and requirements of Freemasonry. It's a bit sad, and I really miss the fellowship I shared within the fraternity, but I'm still friendly with my Masonic mates and, as far as we are concerned, our oaths to each other (effectively) still stand. For me personally, I still consider my oaths to the fraternity as withstanding as well.

Enough about me, though...



posted on Sep, 17 2009 @ 03:20 AM
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reply to post by sirnex
 


Actually, it's black and white whether or not you would qualify for Freemasonry.

When asked the question:

"Do you believe in a supreme being?"

If you can answer "Yes", then it's good enough for Freemasonry.
If you have to say "No", then you can't become a Mason.

There are no questions asked as to what type of supreme being you believe. There are no questions at all as to your beliefs. You simply have to give a "Yes" or "No" answer.

So, if I forced you to give a one-word answer, would it be "Yes" or "No"?



posted on Sep, 17 2009 @ 03:23 AM
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Originally posted by Roark

Dude, I had to leave Freemasonry due to my changing beliefs.


I think this sentence may mislead non-mason readers.

The way you phrase it sounds as if the Masons forced you to leave.

My guess is that you chose to leave yourself due to your changing beliefs.
Would I be right?



[edit on 17/9/2009 by Saurus]



posted on Sep, 17 2009 @ 05:53 AM
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reply to post by Saurus
 


That's the thing... Supreme being as in an intelligent creative entity or can supreme being just be whatever inadequate view I have at the moment?

I don't know whether to answer yes or no at this point. In a sense, yes, but to the point that deity is without, within, and all surrounding. The universe is but it isn't, it exists but it doesn't, it was created but it wasn't created. There was a prime cause to the prime effect, but also at the same time there wasn't.

Then again, maybe I should answer no only because whatever belief I'm developing right now doesn't encompass nor have room for man made magical deities. No, because deity is not some intelligent creative entity that creates out of the whims of humanized emotions?



posted on Sep, 17 2009 @ 06:29 AM
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reply to post by sirnex
 


we talk of traveling to that spiritual building in the sky, and a life after death. We do pray to the great creator, the grand architect of the universe. If you would have issues with those things, then you might not agree with freemasonry. I don't think anyone would try to steer you away from masonry because of what your beliefs would do to them, it's more about what you would feel like being part of a fraternity with those beliefs in mind. Masonry is what it is today because we are a group of like minded people. If you found yourself to not be like minded, you would not have much in common with your fellow brothers and feel left out. Please don't take offense to being told you wouldn't fit in masonry. I don't think you did, but others might see it that way. It's about what you personally would get out of it.



posted on Sep, 17 2009 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by sirnex


That's the thing... Supreme being as in an intelligent creative entity or can supreme being just be whatever inadequate view I have at the moment?


We all have inadequate views of deity. In the large scheme of things, we are simply partially evolved mammals with very limited cognitive functions trying to comprehend the Infinite, which of course is impossible.

You may be interested in learning about the classical occult concept of God. If you've not read it, I would strong recommend the Kybalion.




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