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Survival is a lifestyle

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posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 01:25 PM
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Survival is a lifestyle

I've read many posts on this site about survival. They talk about Bug out bags, the best knife to own and things of that nature. The thing that I find missing is a simple practical approach to living a life that will help you survive.

First, almost any part of any country can be subject to a natural catastrophe. Initial planning for such an occurrence is a great place to start planning.

Questions to ask yourself. If my area is hit by a natural catastrophe could I survive for the next 3-7 days with what I have on hand? Imagine that most services (electric, gas, water) have been cut off.

Do you have a sufficient quantity of water on hand?
Do you have enough food on hand and a way to prepare it?
Do you have any meds, that you may need, on hand?
First aid kit?


Until I started reading the survival posts on this site, I didn't realize how prepared I am compared to most folks.
How did I end up so ready?

First, we shop wisely. When things are on sale, we buy by the case, date the items and use the oldest.
This was largely an effort based on our economics. It makes good sense to save money on things that one uses. Our storage area usually has a number of cases of recent purchases waiting to make it into our pantry.

Second, water. We usually have several 5 gallon jugs of water at any given point in time. Once again, we live in the country and having your power out for several days is a distinct possibility.

Third. Wood burning stove for heat. We've been doing this for 25 years. Great source of heat and it doesn't need the electricity on to work. In the winter you can also use it to cook.

Forth. We have a huge garden. The fruits and veggies that we grow just taste so much better than store bought. We never started out with the thought of a survival garden, we just enjoy it. Our garden is bigger than most people can imagine.

Fifth, tools. Once again we fell into this without thinking. We built our own house and do 99% of the maintenance. I've got quite the selection of tools so I can fix almost anything that is likely to go wrong.


When I was thinking about this, I realized that we are better able to survive because of the life we lead. So, to me survival is more about the choices you make on a day to day basis. It's not a one time event where you run to the store and buy some stuff. It's about acquiring the materials and skills over time.

One big condition. If the news media is predicting a big weather event in your area, by all means trot off to the store and stock up on provisions as necessary.




posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 01:46 PM
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When I think of survival, I think, 10-15 mins to decide what has to go with me...
Every family member here knows what they are taking, everyone should be able to be ready in 10 mins tops.....
I too am like you, I built my home and have fresh ground spring on my property, coming out of a small cliff.
Food... never thought of all the wild things ppl say on here 50# bag O beans, rice, etc...etc to me thats just ludicris.

I often get into these threads and try to figure out what the poster is trying to accomplish.
For me when I think of TSHT the last place to be is in a home unless its built better than Fort Knox!
100+ ppl could and would get in either in a few hours or few days!

Best quote I know and repeat always on here..ask anyone..

Time earned in the wild is not easily earned, and know your land better than the animals that live there!

Unless they sent the best marine sniper with full maps and recent topo maps to go with that, I would/will not have any problems with the average man, women, child, or standard infantry man...thats come into my 10 mile square!



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by Wildbob77
 


Nice post, you are exactly right...it's a lifestyle choice. www.todayssurvival.com...

You make a choice to live differently and free yourself from the system of dependancy we are being forced into, no matter where you live.

Beware of something though, the more independent your become, the fewer friends you will have at first, because they will not be able to relate. Then, you will make more friends and acquaintenances that think like you do. Then it becomes fun and enjoyable. Too many people are "ostriches" with their head in the sand denying that there's anything wrong.

But I like your post!

Bob
www.todayssurvival.com...
Today's Survival Show

[edit on 15-9-2009 by TodaysSurvival]



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 03:10 PM
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It's a tough choice whether or not to bug out or sit tight.

If someone is just beginning this thought process they need to think about the types of disasters for which they might be preparing. They also need to consider their family and/or friends that they may try to help.

For most situations that I foresee, I'd sit tight. I'd only bug out if I had to and I can be ready to go in about 20 minutes.



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 05:20 PM
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Survival is definitely a lifestyle.
Anyone raising children accepts that as a given.

Survival is something that I take very seriously.
I'm not just talking about when the SHTF either.
Everyday life can be an exercise in survival.




When I was thinking about this, I realized that we are better able to survive because of the life we lead. So, to me survival is more about the choices you make on a day to day basis. It's not a one time event where you run to the store and buy some stuff. It's about acquiring the materials and skills over time.


I could not agree with you more.

In the past, I have been left exclusively to my own devices, both as a child and as an adult.
I am confident, that I could leave, with just my go bag and my car and some basic supplies and set up shop anywhere.
I have done this a number times.

Surviving in a SHTF scenario is entirely different, but still somehow the same.
All anyone can do is to be as educated and as prepared as possible.
You never know when you will need it.



Star*
Flag~

[edit on 9/15/2009 by reticledc]



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by reticledc
 


Education and preparation are the keys to survival. I agree 100%.

Most people are neither prepared or educated in terms of survival.

after education and preparation would come planning.



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by Wildbob77
 


Maybe I’m wrong here so flame me if that’s the case- If someone is talking about Survival and “Bug out Bags” they not referring to your garden Variety Natural Catastrophes.

What you referring to in the first part of your e-mail is kinda what happened in Houston last year with Hurricane Ike. No power in most areas for 3-7 days. Others in harder hit areas longer. To me this kinda thing does not come in to my “Survival Vocabulary” and no need for a “Bug out Bag”

The things you mention in your post for this sort of “Disaster” are right on. “Inconvenience preparation.”

Bug out bags would be used if you have to High tail it out of town for whatever the Disaster reason is and live off the land with whatever you have with you.

In your situation, you on land by the sounds of it. So lets make this practical. You have to up and leave your land because the Nuclear facility up wind has exploded and Radiation is coming your way. You may not be able to return for months.

Bug out bag needed.

Nuke attack on 6-7 cities, cutting power, banks, internet down-you can’t draw money, water supply contaminated in many areas, radiation coming your way.

Bug out bad needed!

To me I think this is more in line with what they referring to.



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by SharkBait
 


I agree with you. There are times and/or conditions that would require one to head for the hills. I'm prepared for that contingency as well.

My 4 wheel drive suv would hopefully get me out of town. If we're gridlocked, it's going to be by bike. Worse comes then it's by foot.

Running is one of my last contingencies because I see traffic as a major impediment. If I"m running, there's no secret that everyone needs to get out of the area immediately. I know many lesser used roads that can get me 25-50 miles away pretty quick but with GPS navigation systems anyone can select "alternate route" no freeways and they will be on my roads also.



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 08:58 PM
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A go bag is an everyday item for me.
I'm not going to break out the heavy duty survival gear, but I have another bag packed with essentials.
Wind up radio and flashlight, tools, water, food, clothes, rope, a tarp, and a blanket.
Those essentials will save my arse from those minor "inconveniences"
to the major ones.
It's good practice and practical experience for the real thing.
My knowledge and skills are the other part of the essential equipment.
Even though I may have nothing, I could still improvise.
In an urban environment, the environment becomes your tool.
This may all be a mute point should we get a n**e up our keisters.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by reticledc
 


You have to survive the initial event, whatever it is. Then your survival depends upon how prepared you are.

I live in the country. I'm not to worried about the urban side of survival.

If the hordes ever find my part of the world, then the S really did HTF



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by Wildbob77
 

Understood loud and clear.

Everything depends on survivability of any SHTF scenario.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by SharkBait
Bug out bags would be used if you have to High tail it out of town for whatever the Disaster reason is and live off the land with whatever you have with you.

In your situation, you on land by the sounds of it. So lets make this practical. You have to up and leave your land because the Nuclear facility up wind has exploded and Radiation is coming your way. You may not be able to return for months.

Bug out bag needed.

Nuke attack on 6-7 cities, cutting power, banks, internet down-you can’t draw money, water supply contaminated in many areas, radiation coming your way.

Bug out bad needed!

To me I think this is more in line with what they referring to.


There may be other reasons to go live in the wilderness in a self-sustaining survivalist setting.

As soon as skills and tools be acquired,
we can go.

Capitalist enslavement, toxic city life, government oppression, impersonal police force, excessive judicial policy, corporate advertising, mind control, forced education.

All valid reasons for leading a survivalist lifestyle.
Off the grid and off the record.

A "bug out bag" be an excellent idea.
me have a mountaineering sack.



that cat urinated on it, so it keeps away interested people and animals.

this "bug out bag" as a part of the survivalists lifestyle, can be considered the camping bag.
has all the stuff in it you'd need for camping in the wilderness going cross country.

a knife, an axe,
some rope,
a tent, clothes for weather,
pot, bowl,
dried food, seeds,
and several survivalist related how to books.

if you plan on generating your own electricity, grab copper wire and strong magnets.

Though samta and me be planning on sailing to a place to set up a forest garden.
First got to get to the other side of the country, probably by plane so having the camping "bug out bag" can be useful, as it can be check-in baggage -- so keep it well within the weight range acceptable of flights.

It be a survivalist lifestyle, harvesting your own food and supplies.
I've got some sweet goldenrod drying on some twine near the window,
picked from a natural forest garden,
wild grapes are tasty this time of year, and huckleberries be ripening.



posted on Sep, 24 2009 @ 10:04 PM
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it is indeed a lifestyle...and a way of life. We buy in bulk and rotate stock.... but as for bug outs... we have a designated place to go where we can be very sure we would be safe....

plenty of food, water and supplies that are going to be needed and the ones that will also make good trade items if that should become needed...

but it takes time and preperation along with education, not only about gear you need or will have but about what you and the family actually need...

routes to plan out if leaving, defenses and vehicle readiness all are a part of what is going to be considered .....

but i like this thread it has a lot of damn good information



posted on Sep, 25 2009 @ 12:22 PM
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I am with you 100% wildbob.

Everyone needs to look at their situation both at home and in the wild.
Survival is a way of life and it is a way of life I choose to have, That way I am responsible for me as much as possible and not waiting for a govt to come help me. Look at Hurrican Katrina, how long did some people have to wait for help.



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