It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Evidence of dyeing technology from 31,000 BP

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 08:25 AM
link   


Archaeological investigations at Dzudzuana Cave, in the Republic of Georgia, have recovered flax (Linum usitatissimum) fibers from four Upper Paleolithic occupations. The earliest of the occupations at Dzudzuana is dated between 26,000 and 32,000 radiocarbon years before the present (RCYBP) which calibrates to between 31,000 to 36,000 cal BP.


Full article here

archaeology.about.com...




The fibers are among the oldest evidence of the use of fiber technology, but unlike other examples, Dzudzuana cave offers details about the use of fibers unrecognized to date. The Dzudzuana Cave flax fibers have clearly been modified, cut, twisted and even dyed gray, black, turquoise and pink, most likely with locally available natural plant pigments.





A Professor Easton of Brandeis University once thought that women gathering plants would have noted the discoloration of their fingers from certain plants and that would have led to an early use of dyeing. It would seem she was right - but she thought it would have only gone back around 15,000 BP





posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 11:39 AM
link   
I don't think the issue about dyeing is the news here. It doesn't surprise me that the ancient cultures could dye material. What is very interesting (and your first link supports this) is that they had woven flax fibers. Weaving wasn't thought to be invented for a great deal after the fact.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 11:48 AM
link   
reply to post by TLomon
 


Touche' yes I failed to emphasis the weaving!



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 11:59 AM
link   
Actually, both are of equal importance. This is older than the oldest cave paintings in Europe. The range of colors is interesting, because it suggests they were getting their dyes from either trade or a lot of wandering around.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 12:03 PM
link   
dr olga soffer and her paleolithic weaving



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 12:11 PM
link   
If the plant wasn't flax, only something similar then they could have not dyed it but the similar-to-flax plant could've already been that colour, or over time they could've somehow aquired the colour. Also basic weaving has been around since the first tools-ish.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 01:44 PM
link   
woad and veriseitikki mushrooms are both native to the area [blues and reds]




[edit on 16-9-2009 by Parta]



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 01:49 PM
link   
its nothing new for ancient civilization human always got hes head, but its just how you use it you want to make somthing ? well you need a tool to make it happen or can you manifest it thin air ? ehh not but yes i am very intrested about these kinda finds. i been on myself been on Argeologis sites on myself when i was young in norther europea.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join