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Children hand-rear Lamb, only for it to be slaughtered

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posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 10:39 AM
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I find the fact that the school board found justification in slaughtering a Lamb that the children had raised from birth pretty repulsive. They claimed..

"The children have got to know and love Marcus and it is now the perfect chance to introduce humanity, compassion, respect and understanding to the school instead of betrayal."

...I think the only people who have been betrayed in all of this are the school kids themselves who hand-reared THEIR Lamb and had no say for its future life.


news.bbc.co.uk...

[edit on 14/9/09 by ROBL240]




posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 10:52 AM
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We have this in the US. It's called the 4H Club. I have steaks in my freezer from one of their cows.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 10:59 AM
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I think it's a shame that this so-called scheme was carried out in the first place. The woman claims to be preparing the children for their "adult life", but why would they need to be prepared for something like this? I doubt even one of the children she has ever taught has or ever will become farmers.

It's a fruitless and deliberately controversial exercise.

And this is front page news....

[edit on 14-9-2009 by dodgygeeza]


CX

posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:05 AM
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My kids school does this too, and i think it's a good thing.

They have a farm out the back where they learn to grown fruit and veg, raise animals like pigs and chickens, then at some point in the school years they know it will be slaughtered and used localy for food.

The kids do have the option to either see it killed or not.

You see whilst many of our US members have been raised knowing how farm animals are raised and killed for food, here in the UK it's rare kids get to learn about that unless they have a farm.

I'm glad my kids don't think that meat comes from the supermarket wrapped in shiney plastic, some day they might need to live in the real world of having to do this themselves.

I do understand though that this is a controversial issue, and i respect peoples opinions on the matter.


CX.


[edit on 14/9/09 by CX]



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:08 AM
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Originally posted by ROBL240
I find the fact that the school board found justification in slaughtering a Lamb that the children had raised from birth pretty repulsive. They claimed..

"The children have got to know and love Marcus and it is now the perfect chance to introduce humanity, compassion, respect and understanding to the school instead of betrayal."

...I think the only people who have been betrayed in all of this are the school kids themselves who hand-reared THEIR Lamb and had no say for its future life.


news.bbc.co.uk...

[edit on 14/9/09 by ROBL240]


Did you miss this part?

"Last term, the school council - made up of 14 seven to 11-year-olds - voted 13 to one in favour of sending Marcus to slaughter rather than keeping him."

Those kids knew what they were doing.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:10 AM
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Circle of Life

When children go shopping at the grocery store - - they should know that food doesn't come pre-packaged in little plastic trays.

If they truly know how much work goes into growing food (whether animal or plant) - - they will have more respect for it.

Thanking god for food is one thing. Spiritual thanks for one life sustaining another life - - is much more powerful.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:11 AM
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Aww man...the KIDS voted for it? The humanity.

We're raising a generation of little meat murderers.


[edit on 14-9-2009 by KSPigpen]



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:14 AM
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We only have the word of the school that the children voted for the animals slaughter. And who's not to say they werent told some mystical story about how it was going to a "better place", leading them with false beliefs.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:15 AM
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This is a good thing, there are many kids in the UK who do not know where meat comes from. How can this be a bad thing, it's eduction. kids need to understand where their burger kings and kentucky fried chicken comes from and how it gets on their plate.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:18 AM
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This is a good thing.A generation of kids are growing up not having a clue about where food comes from. There was a documentary in the uk about this and it was shocking to say the least how little children in the 10 to 13 age bracket knew about what they were actually eating when you take away the fancy packaging,funny shapes etc

[edit on 14-9-2009 by Solomons]



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:18 AM
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Wasn't the whole point of raising the lamb to teach children of the realities of farming, as well as our carnivorous nature? If the lamb was being raised as a pet, then yes, this would seem cruel. However, and correct me if I'm wrong, the lamb was being raised as FOOD. It's not like the kids were blindsided and their furry friend was suddenly and surprisingly slaughtered to their horror. Just the opposite, in fact. It's not uncommon for a person of any age to become attached to an animal that was raised since birth, knowing the whole time that it would be ultimately killed and eaten.

In fact, I've been addicted to a show called Gordon Ramsay's F Word, during which every season the chef, along with his wife and young children, raise a different animal in their backyard. At the end of the season, the animal(s) is killed and served at his restaurant. While it's always sad to see an animal that you've become attached to go, it's also a very valuable lesson as to where meat comes from. You could make a debate as to what age is appropriate to teach this to children, but I really don't see a problem in this case.

[edit on 14-9-2009 by greatpiino]



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:35 AM
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Children also don't know a lot about torture methods, yet would it be acceptable for the school to show young kids how interrogation techniques work as to "prepare them for adult life."
How about wheeling in a "Suspect", and showing the children how the military use methods to obtain intel for whatever means or purposes that various case is detained for.
I'm pretty sure that wouldn't go down well with the school board or parents, so how they managed to brainwash them all into believing that kids with a emotional attachment to a animal they've raised (for whatever purpose), and then killing that animal is justified is beyond me.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by ROBL240
 


How can you compare torture methods to the raising and slaughtering of animals for food? These are two COMPLETELY different concepts and I really think the comparison is at best a huge stretch. Kids of all ages all over the world eat meat, and the purpose of teaching them the reality of where it comes from is directly applicable to their daily lives. It has nothing to do with preparing them for their adult lives, it's teaching them about where their food comes from. There are plenty of valid ways to argue that this experience was a bad idea for the children, but this isn't one of them.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by JIMC5499
We have this in the US. It's called the 4H Club. I have steaks in my freezer from one of their cows.


Exactly. I grew up in upstate NY, and at the county fair the 4H club would show and auction off the livestock raised by the kids through the year. This has been going on for generations.

Does this really fit in with the 'General Conspiracy Discussion' group? Sounds more like a Below Top Secret topic to me.

[edit on 9/14/09 by Ferris.Bueller.II]



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by ROBL240
 


They do things like that to help prevent people from thinking like this:

files.abovetopsecret.com...

I don't know how to put pictures in here yet, maybe soon.


See ya,
Shea



[edit on 14-9-2009 by SheaWolf]



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by ROBL240
 


I think you need to go back and read the story properly.

This farming exercise was initiated on the full understanding of what it entailed. The plan was to increase the understanding of farming, NOT KEEPING PETS.

Kids should know where their food comes from, it's better than kids thinking Chicken nuggets grow on trees.

Also, the student council were asked their opinion, and they voted to continue with slaughter.

Seriously, people need to grow up.
To put meat on the table, animals are killed, get used to it or become vegetarian. But don't start banging on about what other people should and should not do.

And all of this is from a former animal rights activist and vegetarian of ten years. The difference is, I make choices based on my life and don't force it onto others. And I don't make knee-jerk responses base on political correctness or imagined moral superiority.

Let the kids learn some reality, it seems they don't have a problem with it, why should you?



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 05:58 PM
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My mother had told us a story about a pet chicken or rooster she had raised when she was younger. At some point, they killed it and she enjoyed it. I personally don't think of these as pets anyway. But I still think animals should have better more natural living conditions before they become our food.

This story here in the OP does make me think of "Children of the Corn"



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally posted by SheaWolf
They do things like that to help prevent people from thinking like this:

files.abovetopsecret.com...


Now that made me splutter coffee in laughter


It quite simply comes down to this...if you dont like the fact that animals die to put food on the dinner table, don't eat it

I do, and have killed little fluffy chickens as a kid that were cared for since they were wee eggs...I love my meat, know exactly where it comes from and just how damn good it tastes for sunday dinner.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 06:10 PM
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I think it boils down to respect. People should be no more offended by this than buying a lb of ground beef at the store. I grew up in the US and never experienced this, in a school setting at least. As long as the kids weren't misled and told that their furry friend would be freed or live forever then its all gravy. I remember the first deer I shot. I felt a pit in my stomach open up, a pretty horrible feeling for a few minutes. I later put 2 and 2 together to realize that I had killed this animal for food, not for sport. Sure I could have gone to the grocery store, but there is valuable knowledge in knowing how to hunt, gut, clean and prepare your own food. The same could be said for this lamb. It taught the children what it takes to keep a lamb alive until its big and mature enough to eat. If the supermarkets close down you might just be glad these future generations learned this skill. Sure it is sad for any kid that had a connection with this animal, but that is life. The more you try to shelter kids from the grim realities of this world, the more time is wasted in changing it, as they have to learn it all on their own.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 06:28 PM
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Mary had a little lamb,
to be raised for food and slaughter.

She dreamed of chops for tea one night,
that bothered all, but nought 'er



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