Here's what I'm stocking up on, How about you?

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posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Jesus H Christ
 


Ditto on your Hiker filter. I have had one for years when they used to be made by PUR. It has successfully seen me through many backpacking trips without any problems. I did just upgrade the filter cartridge to keep on hand in addition to the standard cartridge. I also keep purification tablets on hand as well.

I have personally stocked up on MREs and heater packs due to their long shelf life and ease of use. I also have stocked up on bulk meals from Mountain House and Backpacker's Pantry; Portable propane cylinders for cooking, light and heat, White Gas for my MSR backpacking stove; IMMODIUM and Pepto to take care of any symptoms from bad water or a rapid change in diet (baked beans 2x's a day)
; OTC analgesics, antihistamines, Feminine Hygiene products for my wife and daughters (got that idea from another thread).

Granted, a lot of this stuff is for a home based scenario in the event of an emergency or long term power outage especially as the cold Winter months will soon be upon us. If we need to jump ship, I have a couple of BOB's ready and waiting and will just need to throw in some last minute stuff.




posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by I_am_Spartacus
 


Curious as to why an alternator. I had thought about building a wind turbine hooked up to an alternator and fed into a power inverter. I just never thought it would be that easy so I never did it. But I suppose it could charge a car battery even if you had to manually turn it. I already have a 800 watt power inverter. That will at least keep me on ats for a while.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 01:20 PM
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You didn't mention HOW you are storing these items, but I would suggest you spend some time on packing them properly. For example, coat your cans in paraffin wax and they will last forever. Otherwise, the cans will be very susceptible to rust and changes in temperature.

You didn't specify WHAT disaster you are preparing for, so I'm assuming you are thinking about long-term survival.

Further, make sure you store your grains in buckets filled to the brim. They sell large plastic storage buckets just for this purpose for about $3-5 each. Otherwise, your rice, beans, flour won't last a year. Keep in mind that your house (assuming that's where you are keeping them) won't remain at a somewhat constant temperature if there is no electricity and/or drastic changes in the environment.

Lastly, not sure if you mentioned an edible plants book. Green trail maps. Water filtration system -- Berkey is pretty good.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by Jesus H Christ
 

charging batteries



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 03:44 PM
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I'm glad to see someone mention vinegar, but I think most people don't realize how useful vinegar is for cleaning and disinfecting. It is a great cleaning product. It kills mold too. Not many substances that aren't poisonous to humans can make that claim. I use it for everyday cleaning. A gallon of vinegar is a lot cheaper than a bunch of Clorox products.

Another thing to keep in mind is first aid. I keep a couple of bottles of Tea Tree oil around. It also kills fungus, and you can use it to disinfect cuts. I have a tube of silver infused gel that I use instead of antibiotic cream. It wasn't a cheap item, but it is very effective. And it comes in a big tube by comparison, so even though I have used it often in the past year, I still have more than half a tube left. Instead of bandaids, consider getting medical tape, the cloth kind is very useful. And it can be very cheap. I cut myself while hiking a couple of months ago and was very glad to have a roll of it in my backpack.

I have a bunch of seeds in my fridge in a series of sealed ziplocks within ziplocks sandwiched between silca packs. Some I bought from seed companies on sale like TomatoBob, some I harvested myself from organic produce. I know if the SHTF we will need our canned goods, but what happens when we run out?

I think my stockpile would be okay to keep me and my husband fed for at least a few months if we are careful, BUT he has a lot of relatives in this area, and knowing them, they are not going to be prepared. So, I try to think about the various ways to keep a bunch of spoiled whiny people entertained and fed. I feel pretty good about my odds of surviving various disasters, etc. But the thought of being stuck with them for more than a day or two makes me want to run away screaming



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by AmethystSD
I

I think my stockpile would be okay to keep me and my husband fed for at least a few months if we are careful, BUT he has a lot of relatives in this area, and knowing them, they are not going to be prepared. So, I try to think about the various ways to keep a bunch of spoiled whiny people entertained and fed. I feel pretty good about my odds of surviving various disasters, etc. But the thought of being stuck with them for more than a day or two makes me want to run away screaming


I have fantasies of turning away (or making slaves of, waaaaha hahaha) some of my wifes family members when they start showing up at our door (the ones who have belittled me for being prepared). I have all the juicy lines prepared, lets hope I never have to use them.

[edit on 14-9-2009 by I_am_Spartacus]



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by Mortimer452
 


I'm curious about something you said. We raise chickens, game birds now, but we've had all sorts over the years. We have at least one 6 year old hen that lays as well today as she ever has. Several 4 and 5 yr olds too. Why ever would you think they are past their usefulness for laying after only 2 years?


See ya,
Shea

[edit on 14-9-2009 by SheaWolf]



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by lpowell0627
 


Thanks for the tips. I will be going out tomorrow and getting a few 5gallon buckets. I know just where to get them too. Home Depot sells them for like 4 bucks a peice. They will be great for storing my rice and flour.

Also, How do you know when flour goes bad??



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by Jesus H Christ
 


Watch out for those buckets at Home Depot, you can bet they weren't intended for food. You should get buckets made of food grade plastics, others can leach harmful chemicals into your food, if not ruin it entirely.

See ya,
Shea



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by jibeho
 


On the feminine products,I would recommend the cloth type.You don't
know how long this will last.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:44 PM
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Originally posted by Jesus H Christ
reply to post by lpowell0627
 


Thanks for the tips. I will be going out tomorrow and getting a few 5gallon buckets. I know just where to get them too. Home Depot sells them for like 4 bucks a peice. They will be great for storing my rice and flour.

Also, How do you know when flour goes bad??


The buckets from Home Depot may not be food grade.I bought
several from them for this purpose.Buy maylar food bags and
oxy absorbers.The bags should be the same size as the buckets.



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by mamabeth
 


Good idea with the bags, food grade buckets cost almost twice as much as the others, in some places....and hard to find. Thanks, that puts a lot of our buckets to better uses


[edit on 14-9-2009 by SheaWolf]



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 08:45 AM
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Thank you mamma beth and sheawolf. Awsome tips yet again.
I had no idea.

What would be wrong with just keeping my flour and rice in the bags I bought them in and putting them in buckets?

Also where do you get mylar bags and oxy absorbers???

[edit on 15-9-2009 by Jesus H Christ]



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 09:15 AM
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Originally posted by Jesus H Christ

I recently learned how to bake bread with just very basic ingredients. Needless to say, I stocked up on all those ingrediants. There may be no food on the shelves at the grocery store but there will be fresh baked bread at my house for years to come.
\

If its not asking too much, what is your bread recipe. Simple sounds very good to me.



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by BearTruth
 


5 cups of Flour
2 cups of water/milk is much tastier
2 tbsp of vegetable oil
2 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp Dry active yeast
2 TSP salt...that TSP not TBSP!!!!

For fun I'll throw in a couple TBSP of black pepper or garlic pepper and even a cup of shredded cheese but for survival purposes stick to the above bare min ingredients.

Mix dry ingrediants together using only 2 of the 5 cups of flour!!! Set the other 3 cups aside.

Now take your milk and warm it up in the microwave or over the fire.lol.
not so much hot but nice and warm. very warm.

Take that milk and vegetable oil and pour it into your dry ingrediants and mix it up good.

Let that sit for 10 mins. this is called 'The Sponge' and it will rise rather quickly due to the yeast.

After 10 mins pour in the rest of the flour and knead for about ten mins.

The consistancy should feel about like pinching your earlobe. You may need to add a little more flour to get it to where it isn't so sticky.

Let that big glob of dough sit covered with a clean towel in a warm place for about an hour.

Ding, hours up. Now divide that in half and place into two buttered/greased up bread pans. I preferr the glass ones but metal is better to have around for survival cuz....THEY CAN"T BREAK!!!!
You may/will have to puch the bread down into the pans to get the loaves to lay flat and come out looking good.

Now, let that sit for another hour. You will see at the end of the hour that your loaves have risen.

Now put those loaves/pans into a preheated oven at 350 for 20 mins exactly.

Ding!!! I promise you, you will have perfect bread every EVERY time. I have never yet to burn or mess up a single loaf. and I have baked my fair share let me tell you. I will not buy store bought "bread" anymore and neither will you.


That crap that passes for bread in the stores is fluff. It has no nutrients whatsoever.

Now, let me know how it turned out please.



[edit on 15-9-2009 by Jesus H Christ]



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by Jesus H Christ
Thank you mamma beth and sheawolf. Awsome tips yet again.
I had no idea.

What would be wrong with just keeping my flour and rice in the bags I bought them in and putting them in buckets?

Also where do you get mylar bags and oxy absorbers???

[edit on 15-9-2009 by Jesus H Christ]


That's what I've been doing.I kept the flour,rice,sugar,beans,macaroni,
spaghetti in their original packages.They are in the buckets but,they are
not stored for long term storage.If they are to be stored for long term,
I would use the mylar bags and oxy absorbers.
I bought mine from a company off the internet,I can't remember right
off hand.I'll look them up and let you know.



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by SheaWolf
 


If you ask around subway sandwich stores or the walmart deli, they have food grade buckets they throw out all the time.

Some walmarts have a subway store in them, double whammy!!!



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Jesus H Christ
 


The mylar bags and oxy absorbers can be purchased through,
U.S.A.Emergency Supply.



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 03:56 PM
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You know back in the day, (20's and 30's) they used root cellars. Primarily just a hole dug into the ground a certain depth (don't know that) and kept some of their food items there. I believe my mom told me that pork was cured in a room outside the home and kept in the root cellar. I guess they did this in the late fall and early winter after the ground became cold enough to preserve the meat for a while anyway.

One other item my mom told was during WWII or after, the government sent their "grim reapers" to farms and if they had too many hogs or cows, the government would kill those animals over the limit. The people weren't allowed to have excess. I don't know what the reasoning, she never said why it was done.



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 04:14 PM
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I have a can sealer and when i find the cans for sale i have canned every thing from food to ammo.
www.canningpantry.com...
www.freundcontainer.com...

The old can sealer i have i got from a old guy that lived in Alaska and canned his own smoked salmon every year plus deer meat and dry food for the year. This can sealer is older then i am and i am 58 years old.

You can take dry beans, rice, flour, or any other dry food and can it then put it in a oven at 175 to 200 degrees for 30 min to a hour and it will kill all insects or other bad things that might be in the food.
Then dipped in wax the canned food will last for years.(if you are in bear country use paraffin wax. not bees wax. the bears can smell bees wax and they can open cans. They have a mouth full of can openers.)

You can even put the spices and mix some dry foods so that all you have to do is add water and cook.
I have done corn meal with diced dry apples for cornbread in the cans ready to add water and bake.

This can be done with beans or rice just wrap whatever dry spices you want in foil and put it in the can with the dry beans.

In a SitX you can use the can as a cooking pot.





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