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Eurocopter: The EC 120

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posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 05:54 PM
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Just a few days ago I was flipping through my local newspaper and an article caught my attention. It was a press release in regards to a new helicopter for the Edmonton Police Service. The strange thing is that the EPS already has an EC 120 which was brought into service eight years ago, so that makes it two as of now.

Now I’m a little suspicious because of the fact that not only is there two watching eyes in the sky but a more sinister agenda is becoming more apparent. It should come as no surprise to some of you that the police state in every city across the globe is beefing up their manpower, firepower and equipment to deal with unruly individuals and groups who threaten the N.W.O.

So I ended up doing some digging into the company responsible for the manufacturing of the two EPS EC 120’s. (Source material taken from Wikipedia)

The Eurocopter Group is a European helicopter manufacturing and support company formed in 1992 from the merger of German Daimler-Benz Aerospace (DASA) and the helicopter divisions of French Aerospatiale. As a result of the merger from Eurocopters former parent company, the firm is a wholly owned subsidiary of EADS. As of 2007, more than 9,800 Eurocopter helicopters were in service with over 2,500 customers in 140 countries.

Products Made by Eurocopter

• AS 332 Super Puma – medium sized, twin engine transport/utility helicopter • AS 350/AS 355/EC 130 Ecureuil – light utility helicopter • AS 365/SA 365 Dauphin – medium weight ,multipurpose, twin engine helicopter • AS 532 Cougar – twin engine, medium weight, multipurpose helicopter • AS 550/AS 555 Fennec – Single engine, light weight, multipurpose helicopter • AS 565 Panther – military medium weight, multipurpose, twin engine helicopter • EC 120 Colibri (with Harbin Aircraft Manufacturing Company) 5 seat, single engine, single main rotor, light helicopter. • EC 130 – light helicopter • EC 135 – twin engine, civil helicopter • EC 145 – twin engine, medium utility helicopter • EC 155 – long range, medium lift, passenger transport helicopters • EC 175 – medium sized, twin engine transport/utility helicopter (Unveiled at the Heli-expo 2008) first flight planned for 2009 • EC 225 – long range passenger transport helicopter • EC 635 – military light multipurpose helicopter • EC 665 Tiger – military attack helicopter • EC 725 Cougar – long range tactical helicopter • MBB Bo 105 – light, twin engine, multipurpose utility helicopter • MBB/Kawasaki BK 117 (with Kawasaki Heavy Industries) – twin engine medium utility/transport helicopter • NH90 – medium sized, twin engine, multi role military, fly by wire helicopter (via joint venture)

Due to its 62.5%-share, Eurocopter also participates on the production of the NH90 Utility Helicopter Project. On some of Eurocopter's aircraft the main rotor turns clockwise when viewed from above, unlike most American rotorcraft. This requires the pilot to make pedal movements that are the opposite to those learned if previous flying has been on an American aircraft. On models developed in Germany or with their input (BK 117, EC 135, EC 145, UHT Tiger, Bo 105, et cetera) this is not the case. Eurocopter also pioneered the use of the "fenestron", an enclosed tail-rotor, which is more efficient and safer than the exposed version.

Design and development
The EC120 B is mostly built from composite materials and has a fenestron (shrouded) tail rotor, making it a particularly quiet helicopter (FAA Appendix J flyover noise signature = 78.7 dB SEL, 6.7 dB SEL below Stage 2 limits). Certified to FAR 27 standards, the EC120 B also features crash-resistant seats and a crash-resistant fuel system. The design of the Colibri's wide cabin (featuring excellent visibility) makes it suitable for wide variety of civilian and parapublic missions, such as utility transport, offshore transport, training, law enforcement, casualty evacuation and corporate transport. In the casualty evacuation role, the helicopter can carry one pilot and one stretcher patient as well as one or two medical attendants. For cargo carrying, the Colibri can carry one pilot plus 2.94 cubic meters (103.9 cu. ft.) of total useful load volume (cabin and hold). The EC120's 0.8 cubic meter (28.3 cu. ft.) hold is accessible from the side and rear. In addition to its civilian roles, the Colibri is also used by the military for training, observation and light utility missions. In the latter role, it can carry a sling load cargo of up to 700 kg (1,543 lb). The EC120 B is able to carry equipment such as FLIR cameras, spotlights and other useful tools. Some law enforcement agencies using the EC120 B include: U.S Customs and border protection agency, the Edmonton Police Service, Calgary Police Service and the York Regional Police

Operational history
The first EC120 B was delivered in 1998 and by 2008 Eurocopter had already delivered more than 550 Colibris to various customers. In 2004, the DHS and the CBP selected the EC120 B to meet its Light Sign Cutter requirement, a program potentially involving 55 aircraft with a total value of US$ 75 million in then-year dollars. In 2006, the CBP ordered 15 EC120 B helicopters, with a further 5 aircraft since ordered. In January 2008, the French Defense Ministry selected the EC120 as the French's Army new lead-in rotary-wing trainer, replacing the Aerospatiale Gazelle. 36 EC120 Bs equipped with Sagem avionics will be operated through a 22-year public private partnership (PPP), with the first aircraft due to arrive in 2010.

It`s obvious that this company his ties with the Military industrial complex and various agencies around the world. The DHS must have invested quite a bit into this model, given how quietly it can operate without anyone really noticing.




posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 06:25 PM
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Variants

• EC120 B Colibri: Standard designation (original designation during development was "P120")
• HC120: The HC120 is a licensed Chinese-built variant of the EC120

Operators

Canada

• One currently operated by FinnAir out of Penticton, BC
• Two currently operated by Phoenix Heli-Flight
• York Regional Police
• Two in Service with both the Edmonton Police Service and Calgary Police Service
• RCMP “E” Division
• Vancouver Police
• One currently operated by LR Helicopters Inc. out of Calgary Alberta

China

• People`s Liberation Army Aviation Corps
• One in service with the Public Security Bureau in Guandong province

Germany

• Six in service with the German Federal Police to be used for pilot training

India

• Two in service with APOORVA Aviation for training of Indian helicopter pilots

Indonesia

• As Police Patrol helicopter
• Also used as a light utility helicopter by the Indonesian Air force and Indonesian Navy

Lithuania

• Two in service with the State Border Guard Service used primarily for air surveillance, patrol and training

Mexico

• Five in service with Federal Preventive Police

Romania

• 2 in service with the Civil Aviation School
• 1 in service for Direct Aero Services
• 1 in service Corsarul Rosu Air
• 1 in service Dunca Expeditii

Singapore

Republic of Singapore
• 124 Sqn with four EC 120s as a basic helicopter trainer

Spain

• Fifteen in service with the Spanish Air Force as training helicopters
• Seven in service with the DGT (National Traffic Authority)
• Two in service with the Cuerpo Nacional de Policiia (National Police)

Slovenia

• One in service with FlyCom air surveillance company

Sweden

• The old Swedish firm Jamlands Flyg operates three EC120B mainly in the mountainous regions bordering Norway.
• Two are in service with Fiskflyg in the mountain area of northern Sweden bordering Norway.

United States

• One in service with Albuquerque Police Department providing airborne law enforcement support.
• One in service with the Austin Police Department
• Four in service with the Baltimore, MD Police Department
• Two in service with the Fresno Police Department
• One in service with the Hillsborough County Sheriff`s Office
• Three in service with the Manatee County Sheriff's Office, providing airborne law enforcement support
• Three in service with the Costa Mesa Police Department and Newport Beach Police Department (California).
• Three in service with the Sacramento County Sheriff`s Department and used by its air support bureau to conduct police patrols and supporting Homeland Defence personnel in Sacramento, California.
• One in service with the San Jose Police Department
• Fifteen in service with U.S. Customs and Border protection agency as well as the Department of Homeland Security. Mainly used for low level surveillance and security patrol of the U.S border.





posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 08:20 PM
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What's weird is that Calgary upgraded from there old helicopter to one of these. The old one was more agile, had better optics, easier maintenance and could get into tighter spaces.

The new one is way more $$ to operate and maintain. It is more staple and has two seats in the back for snipers which the old one didn't have.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 08:24 PM
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So can we fine the Edmonton police under the unnecessary noise bylaw?



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by exile1981
What's weird is that Calgary upgraded from there old helicopter to one of these. The old one was more agile, had better optics, easier maintenance and could get into tighter spaces.

The new one is way more $$ to operate and maintain. It is more staple and has two seats in the back for snipers which the old one didn't have.


I think both police commissions in Edmonton and Calgary purchased them for the reason of keeping a slightly lower profile when it comes to real time surveillance and ground support operations. A little expensive and harder to maintain but I'm pretty sure the brass could careless about the fact, plus it gives them excuse to purchase more helicopters if one breaks down.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 09:47 PM
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Originally posted by dainoyfb
So can we fine the Edmonton police under the unnecessary noise bylaw?


I've already complained several times and all get for feedback from them is:

"sir have bigger drink before bed if were keeping you up"

[edit on 9/13/2009 by Big Oil]



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 09:53 PM
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Sorry no N.W.O. here. The E.P.S. said they needed the second copter because they had times when the first was in for regular servicing and they had nothing to fly. With the second one, they will always have one able to fly when they need.

If you don't do anything bad, there is no need to worry about who is watching.

Good info though, I was wonder what my taxes were being spent on



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by Grayarea
 


Great! Typing isn't "bad". Can I watch while you type in your PIN and passwords? Sex isn't "bad" either! Can your perverted landlord hide some cameras in your bedroom?

We should just make a law that all new buildings have to be made out of glass so that we can be sure everybody is behaving? The way we build houses in this country everything should be Orwellian standard within about 50 years.

I think we should put a tracking bracelet on you and publicize a live feed. Then we can incorporate a law that mandates that we all vote on how you should better spend your every waking moment. If we do that with everybody we could have the perfect society within about 2 years!

1984? THX1138? The Island? Logan's Run?



posted on Sep, 14 2009 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


Sorry, turning a simple helicopter purchase into what you are saying is just being paranoid.

What's next, saying the postal service is part of the NWO too ? They deliver letters that have stamps !!!! The stamps are just mini nukes to depopulate the world when these people that are out to get you feel like eliminating you.

Life is too short to be paranoid about everything, go out and enjoy, you may find, like those before that were paranoid, you'll grow old and die like the rest of us.



posted on Sep, 18 2009 @ 09:55 PM
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It's just the ever increasing ratcheting down of society by the Elites. I'm not to worried about helicopters with FLIR(which they all have anymore), but I am worried about the increase in bloated fat petty power junkie. It seems most any agency involved with govt. is in this regard anymore. Kinda sucks.

I know in my hometown in Texas; the police are apparently rolling around on H1 ALPHAs, and BMW motorcycles......... What a joke on the People.


S&F



posted on Sep, 26 2009 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by Big Oil
Just a few days ago I was flipping through my local newspaper and an article caught my attention. It was a press release in regards to a new helicopter for the Edmonton Police Service. The strange thing is that the EPS already has an EC 120 which was brought into service eight years ago, so that makes it two as of now.

Now I’m a little suspicious because of the fact that not only is there two watching eyes in the sky but a more sinister agenda is becoming more apparent. It should come as no surprise to some of you that the police state in every city across the globe is beefing up their manpower, firepower and equipment to deal with unruly individuals and groups who threaten the N.W.O.


Speaking of the police helicopter, since 1 of the choppers fly over into the St. Albert region, a friend and I were walking in one of the ravines lastnight, and apparently people actually complain about kids fooling and hanging around in these ravines that we walked through, and this was at about 10:00p.m. And here comes the helicopter that was circling over us, and had it's spot light not directly on us but just behind the fence and trees thankfully, but I'm sure they would have spotted us with the Infrared Light Camera. And shortly after all of that excitement, we saw a huge porcipine. :p If we got caught my excuse that I'm sticking to is that, it wasn't 11 o clock yet.

Anyway more things to add:

St. Albert has recently bought a police cart to go around on these Red Willow Trails that we walk on. We are not allowed to be in Parking lots, or hang around in parks after 11p.m.

We have also 2 intersections that have red light cameras and recently upgraded them to catch speeders who are going though those intersections when lights are still green.

A few of the intersections have been installed with 4 cameras, one camera on each corner.

We implemented an anti idling bylaw last year, but they aren't strictly enforcing it.

Umm another thing to add is now in the Edmonton region they have added advertisements on the radio to expand the police force. Well there's my big brother update.

[edit on 26-9-2009 by Shrukin89]



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