It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What Do the United States of America, and Her People, Fear about the Metric System?

page: 2
7
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 05:04 PM
link   
reply to post by Pilgrum
 


Thanks, Pilgrum, for the perspective.

NOW, if we can just get you blokes to drive on the correct side of the road!!!




posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 05:07 PM
link   
I never have any idea what anything means with your system so sometimes when watching mythbusters and they throw numbers around, I dont know what kind of dimensions they mean...

It would be simpler if you would switch.




[edit on 12-9-2009 by Copernicus]



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 05:12 PM
link   
I'll tell you why the metric system isn't used by the U.S., it was made by the French, and we all know how much that the U.S. looks down on the French. This is one of the many things that the U.S. doesn't want to be associated with, because of the French.

Trust me, as a Canadian, go with the metric system, it will make your lives a whole lot better.



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 05:20 PM
link   
reply to post by Copernicus
 


Let's see if I remember how it worked...and I believe this was imported with the (former) British colonists....

An "inch" was the length of some Monarch's thumb from the tip to the first knuckle...the "foot" originally, again, the length of a King's foot, later "standardized" to 12 'inches'....

Don't know why a "yard" is three 'feet'. The 'mile' comes actually from Roman days, so I read. It originally was the length of a thousand paces ('mille' in Latin) of the Centurions on march.

Then, there's the difference between 'statute' miles (5,280 feet) and 'nautical' miles (6,076 average)...

Here's more on the mile than you probably ever wanted to know...

Below the inch, we get into every schoolkid's favorite math subject, fractions!!!

Guess it startd by halving the 'inch', and just kept going in multiples of two...yikes!! It is cumbersome.

And we haven't even begun to talk about measures of liquid volume....weight...etc.



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 05:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by whitewave
It's fine for banking but not for astronomy, quantum physics, higher education subjects.



What?!? Since banking is already done in a decimal system, you must mean that metric is not good for astronomy, quantum physics, higher education subjects. Even in the US, most serious science is done in metric.

If I got the intent of your post backwards... oops.



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 10:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by weedwhacker
reply to post by Copernicus
 


Let's see if I remember how it worked...and I believe this was imported with the (former) British colonists....

An "inch" was the length of some Monarch's thumb from the tip to the first knuckle...the "foot" originally, again, the length of a King's foot, later "standardized" to 12 'inches'....

Don't know why a "yard" is three 'feet'. The 'mile' comes actually from Roman days, so I read. It originally was the length of a thousand paces ('mille' in Latin) of the Centurions on march.

Then, there's the difference between 'statute' miles (5,280 feet) and 'nautical' miles (6,076 average)...

Here's more on the mile than you probably ever wanted to know...

Below the inch, we get into every schoolkid's favorite math subject, fractions!!!

Guess it startd by halving the 'inch', and just kept going in multiples of two...yikes!! It is cumbersome.

And we haven't even begun to talk about measures of liquid volume....weight...etc.


So basically it's like a chop shop of other mesurement systems to confuse the masses?



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 12:34 AM
link   
reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Driving on the other side of the road is no problem at all but driving on the wrong side of the car - now there's a challenge


The US gallon seems to be the odd one out even among nations still using the imperial system. Our gallon was and still is 8 imperial pints or 4 imperial quarts and equals 4.54 litres in the metric equivalent but the US gallon amounts to only 3.5 litres meaning that for some reason, buried in the mists of time, the US standard pint was created smaller than the British pint (438mL versus 568mL).

On the issue of tools, imperial spanners & sockets go in increments of 1/16" and metric tools go in increments of 1mm which is a finer scale than imperial (1mm vs 1.59mm steps) meaning that a metric tool can always be found to fit an imperial hex-. bolt nicely with the exception of very small bolts like under 1/2" or 10mm.

Torque settings can be a challenge when overhauling an engine IE the manual specifies them in ft-lb and Nm (Newton Metres) and my torque wrench is calibrated in kgf-cm.

The solution: a pocket calculator



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 12:45 AM
link   
It would cost to much money.

Sure a gradual change would make it easier, but it would cost the same. If I took the nations check card to the store I wouldn't be able to purchase a candy bar.

Before we try and do something this superficial lets work our way up to buying that 50 cent candy bar.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 01:55 AM
link   
re: Canada

Most Canadians know the Standard system as well as the Metric system. A lot of our industry destined for export to the US will use the Standard system. (Lumbermills and other manufacturer for example ie 2x4, 2x6, etc.)

I didn't know my height or weight in centimeters or kilograms until I moved out of Canada.

I've work on a few construction sites while in college and they all use the Standard system as well. (IMO, this would probably be one of the last sector to change over to metric)

I think most Canadians don't use or understand Fahrenheit and I personally have to convert into Celsius to figure out the temperature. (this is probably one of the easiest area to apply the metric system)

Our automobiles have both miles and kilometers on the guage. (I'm not sure if the newer cars still have this) - Road signs are strictly metric, causing a great number of Americans to speed when coming up here. (Could be just the excuse they are using
- 50 miles /hour in the city!!)

I'd really like to see metric time applied worldwide. The current base-60 system makes it difficult to make calculations involving time.


[edit on 13/9/09 by ConspiracyNut23]



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:00 AM
link   
reply to post by ConspiracyNut23
 


Road construction uses the metric system.

I got into a lot of trouble when I ran grade the first time and used standard instead of metric.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:08 AM
link   
Who cares what system we use?

That is the least of the world's worries.

If the movers and shakers in the world settled down and stopped trying to change everything, maybe it would help all of us.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:13 AM
link   
Obviously from the way we handle our money, we sure arent very good with numbers.
And from the way we have a firm grasp of our language also,
to think we could wrap our minds around this is pretty far fetched.
As to your question, it's just common americant arrogance.


[edit on 13-9-2009 by dodadoom]



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:20 AM
link   
reply to post by dodadoom
 


Actually, it is not American arrogance.

It results from some other idiot who thought it would be a good idea to fix something that was working - a really bad idea.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:27 AM
link   
reply to post by spellbound
 


Its already been "fixed" in every country but ours.
Is that a clue we are a tad slow? Or just arrogant?
Maybe it would help to know we would save money
by not having to convert everything over constantly.
Only just once.
I know change is a big, scary and ugly beast to be let out of its cage.
But we will need to gather our courage someday.
Ah yes, here it is again,
land of the greed, home of the 'fraid!



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:32 AM
link   
reply to post by dodadoom
 


I salute the USA for not changing.

I don't think anything needed changing - that was my point.

Have you ever noticed that when things are working OK, some idiot steps up and changes things?



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:40 AM
link   
reply to post by spellbound
 

I wish they would change the money from the bankers hands to ours!
That would be a change I think we may all agree on.....
Or a change from a system of corruption to a system of fairness.
You mean that kind of change?
I still think we are just scared of ANY change.
Except maybe quarters.
For this change would require some mental work and thats
out of the question, I know.
And you wonder why I picked this name!


I'll have to tell you the story sometime about the islanders who
refused to change when they could of, and instead died out from their
unwillingness(arrogance) to adapt to their changing environment,
and dwindling lack of resources.
All due mainly to their indifference of others and their own outright greed. Sound familier?



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:41 AM
link   
I believe the big issue here is, does America actually want to manufacture and export things to the rest of the world, or just go completely broke ?.

As the rest of the entire world is now using metric, everything imported into the USA is going to be metric anyway.

Or put more crudely, fit in, or wither and die economically.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:45 AM
link   
reply to post by Silver Shadow
 

Um, can I answer this?
I think we are past broke.
But, very good point.
Too late to save us, but good try anyway!



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:46 AM
link   
reply to post by dodadoom
 


Forget the system - NO, the rich people are never going to change.

NO, the powerful people (same thing) are never going to change.

People in power are corrupt.

So, as I said, how we weigh or measure things is beside the point.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 02:57 AM
link   
I know of more then one US company that has found counterfeit products just because China or India used metric instead of imperial nuts and bolts in the products.

This is why some US companies tend to stay with inch, foot, instead of going to metric.

As for cars metric or imperial makes little deference to me.

What drives me totally NUTS are cars that use both.
I had a 78 ford Courier truck that had a engine and tranmistion that were metric and the rest of the truck was in imperial.
I know that it must have drove others nuts because there are few on the road today. Most have been junked. Because there was no place to carry both tool kits?????????



new topics

top topics



 
7
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join