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Moon Landing Flag and the temp/humidity effects of space?

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posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 06:21 PM
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Space is said to be freezing cold, and special materials are needed in space, heat resistant from radiation and insulated from the cold. But, we used a cloth flag on the moon.

Something about this bothers me as shouldn't the flag have moisture if it was in the lander for many days? Why wouldn't it freeze? Yet, the flag maintained it's flexibility when being erected.

The other question has to do with the temperature and effects of that on cloth material.

I am not an expert, or even know anything about this but have this simple question to pose to members that may be able to speculate further on this matter.




posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 06:40 PM
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This is why: Water requires pressure to stay in liquid form. here on earth (and in the pressurized lander) the water is under pressure. Thats why water boils at lower and lower temperatures as you go up in altitude. and in space where there is no pressure water instantly vaporizes, literally boils, it doesnt freeze because it is a gas.

P.S. As close to the sun as we (and the moon) are space has a large range of temperatures. anywhere from 250F to - 250F i could be wrong on the exact numbers as i am to lazy to look it up LOL. but it gets the point across.

[edit on 11-9-2009 by Aggamemnon]



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 07:58 PM
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I have heard, from one of the history channel shows that the flag on the moon is either a white rectangle or was destroyed during takeoff. This actually makes sense to me, because when I was a kid I saw this Twizzlers wrapper in the overgrown area. Every time I came out, it lost it's color just a bit more than the last. And that was plastic. And through our atmosphere. The moon has no atmosphere, and the flag is cloth, so I do believe this, unless we never made it there to start with



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 11:43 PM
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reply to post by Aggamemnon
 


I'm curious, how do you explain ice debris that NASA constantly catches on camera that people think are UFO's. Are they UFO's then? Maybe I'm just not getting how ice can form and float in space yet on the moon it instantly evaporates.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by ExPostFacto
 


Hmm man, dig your thought process here. haha.
Hopefully someone with some real knowledge in this area pops around. Great eyebrow raiser.



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by ExPostFacto
 

First, space is not "cold". The term is meaningless in a vacuum.

When liquid water is released from the space shuttle it vaporizes because of the lack of pressure. Because of the expansion, the vapor cools rapidly and then freezes into ice. The ice does eventually sublimate away when heated by sunlight but it takes a while.

The flags were made of nylon. Nylon does not absorb water. So even if the atmosphere in the LMs was very humid (I don't think it was), the flags would not be wet (or even moist). But even if they were, the water would not freeze in the fabric, it would vaporize then form a thin cloud of ice crystals which would fall to the Moon's surface. In a way, the flags would be "freeze dried" as soon as they were exposed to the vacuum.


[edit on 9/12/2009 by Phage]



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Haha, cool. I was hoping you'd stop by.



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 12:47 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Awesome thank you Phage for the clarification. I guess I can chalk that theory up :p



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Put much better than i could have put it XD
but i hope my point came across ok.



posted on Sep, 13 2009 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


very good and concise, except 1 thing

nylon does absorb water, up to 8% by volume in some polymers.
nylon 6/6 is the least hygrosopic with an absorbtion level of about 3%.
Not much but enough to have measurable effects on the mechanical properties of the material.


The flag isnt there anymore, ultraviolet radiation will have broken down the nylon by now.
There might be some tattered remnants but it is most likely gone.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 03:23 PM
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I thought my theory died with this thread but then I realized, why are we looking for water on the moon if it just disappears in space. Seems like the moment of impact it would vaporize or can we measure vaporized water in space?


Finding water on the moon would not only be a major scientific discovery, it would also have a profound effect on plans to establish a semipermanent moon base. Water would not only be useful for drinking, it could also be used to produce oxygen for respiration and to serve as a source of rocket fuel for a trip to Mars.


www.latimes.com...



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by ExPostFacto
 


Any water "on" the moon would be located under the surface, presumably in a frozen state.



posted on Sep, 16 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by ExPostFacto
 

The short answer is yes. Both water vapor and water ice can be detected by instruments on Earth and instruments on the LCROSS satellite.
lunarscience2009.arc.nasa.gov...



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